High-Earning Careers That Anyone Can Pursue

High-Pay Jobs Anyone Can Pursue

Not all high-earning careers require medical school or a Ph.D.

By Molly Marcot
If the job you're in right now is barely offering enough money to make ends meet, you probably wouldn't mind an upgrade.
Perhaps you've been putting off looking for something new because it seems like all the high-paying careers require advanced schooling like a master's degree, medical school, or a doctoral program.
However, you may be surprised at how many high-paying careers require only a bachelor's degree.
In fact, with the right college degree under your belt, you could find yourself on track to pursuing one of the high-paying careers below.

Career #2: Market Research Analyst

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Median
Annual Salary*
$60,300
Top 10%
of Earners*
More than $113,500
Bottom 10%
of Earners*
Less than $33,280
By evaluating market conditions, market research analysts study what factors will make a potential sale of a product or service successful and why, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. They predict sales and marketing trends, gather consumer and market data, and assess the effectiveness of marketing strategies.
High-Pay Potential: "A market research analyst is valued in the marketplace primarily because most of our businesses and most organizations are very data-driven," Key says. "It's about being able to connect the dots for the people above you and those technical people who may be putting together the product or service. You have to be able to see detail as well as see the big picture."
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How to Get Started: While the pay and the job might seem intimidating, you don't need a master's to get into this field. In fact, what's typically needed, per the Department of Labor, is a bachelor's degree in market research or a related field, such as business administration.

Career #3: Personal Financial Advisor

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Median
Annual Salary*
$67,520
Top 10%
of Earners*
More than $187,199
Bottom 10%
of Earners*
Less than $32,280
Personal financial advisors help busy people choose the best options for their money. The U.S. Department of Labor states that personal finance advisors research and recommend the plans for clients' financial goals pertaining to their insurance, taxes, and retirement funds.
High-Pay Potential: The amount of knowledge required for this career helps practitioners command a high salary. According to Key, "This is a continuous learning field. [Personal financial advisors] have to re-certify on a regular basis, which makes this career a high-paying job." Financial advisors are not only able to manage complicated math, but they also enjoy finding creative solutions to problems, as well as specializing in attention to detail, says Key.
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How to Get Started: If you have strong money management skills, you could be well-suited for this career. Only a bachelor's degree is typically needed for a personal financial advisor career, the Department of Labor says. Although employers don't require a specific field of study, according to the Department, one degree that could provide good preparation for this career is finance.

Career #4: Logistician

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Median
Annual Salary*
$72,780
Top 10%
of Earners*
More than $112,100
Bottom 10%
of Earners*
Less than $45,190
Are you good at puzzles and sorting things out? Logisticians try to ensure that all the pieces of a supply chain puzzle fit together so that the entire process, from acquisition to delivery, runs smoothly. The U.S Department of Labor states that logisticians use software systems to direct and track the movement of goods from suppliers to consumers. They suggest improvements to management and review the success level of logistical functions.
High-Pay Potential: Whatever the business, the logistician is responsible for making sure the production line doesn't break down, so he or she has a vital - and often well-compensated - role. "As a logistician, results count," Key says. "In business having what you need when you need it is critical, so logisticians working within a supply chain have important responsibilities, such as getting supplies like water and food to a storm area or products into a retail store to delight holiday shoppers."
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How to Get Started: It may surprise you to learn that a logistician position is far from out of reach. In fact, some logistician positions may only require an associate's degree, according to the Department of Labor, while many others may require a bachelor's degree in business.

Career #5: Network and Computer Systems Administrator

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Median
Annual Salary*
$72,560
Top 10%
of Earners*
More than $115,180
Bottom 10%
of Earners*
Less than $44,330
If you're fascinated by computer systems, then network and computer systems administrator may be the job for you. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, network and computer systems administrators collect data to evaluate a system's performance so that improvements can be made. They are also responsible for installing hardware and software components, training staff members how to use system features, and solving network problems when issues arise.
High-Pay Potential: It shouldn't surprise you to learn that the people who make sure our computer networks run the way they are supposed to get paid well. Key states that, "Almost anything and everything today is running on a network, from our telephones to ATMs. Network and computer systems administrators must make certain all these computer systems coordinate correctly, which makes these jobs high-stakes and high-stress. When things work so well when we turn them on, we don't always understand what happens behind the scenes."
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How to Get Started: If you've got an interest in honing your problem-solving and computer skills, keep reading. This is another career that you don't need years and years of schooling to get into. The Department of Labor states that most employers require a bachelor's degree in computer or information science, and some may require just a postsecondary certificate.

Career #6: Aerospace Engineer

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Median
Annual Salary*
$103,720
Top 10%
of Earners*
More than $149,120
Bottom 10%
of Earners*
Less than $65,450
Do you dream of sending people and technology into space? The U.S. Department of Labor says aerospace engineers design and test out essential aerospace products such as missiles, satellites, and spacecraft. Responsibilities include evaluation of products for safety and quality, inspection of damaged products, and direction of product manufacture.
High-Pay Potential: "[Aerospace engineers] are in high demand because the aerospace manufacturing business is a huge market within the government and private companies," Key says. "From how our cars run to developing aircraft, there's a lot of application for aerospace engineering in a large number of industries."
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How to Get Started: You might think you need to be a rocket scientist for a job as an aerospace engineer, but according to the Department of Labor, a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering or some type of engineering or science related to aerospace systems is what's usually needed. Depending on if the job pertains to national security, some security clearance may also be required.

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