High-Paying Careers for Your Personality Type

High-Pay Jobs For Your Personality

Feel like you're at the wrong job? Then check out some high-pay careers that could be a better fit for your personality.

By Terence Loose
Do you feel like you're stuck in the wrong job? You may be left wondering what careers would suit your personality better. Well, you don't have to figure it all out on your own. You can look to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) assessment test for some guidance.
This test is commonly used to divine whether a person is, for instance, more introverted or extroverted or whether someone makes decisions based more on feeling or logic. The MBTI outlines 16 distinct personality types, specified through a series of letters that correspond to personality traits. For example, "E" is for extrovert, or "I" is for introvert.
Many professionals use the test as a tool to guide them toward the right career choice for their particular personality. If you are taking the test for that purpose, then you may want to take it through a professional and certified administrator, says Dr. Suzanne Anthony, a practicing clinical psychologist.
extrovertextrovertMatching your personality type up with a career that requires that type's strengths can help you succeed and enjoy your work more, says Anthony.
However, she says there is not a direct correspondence between a personality type and a specific career. "There may be several personality types that could lend themselves to a given career and each personality type may be a good fit for several different professions," she says.
But Anthony was kind enough to match some personality types to some specific well-paying careers. So keep reading to see if your personality might extrovertbe fit to pursue one of these professions.

Career #1: Psychologist

Median Annual Salary:*
$67,650
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
$109,340
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
$38,450
Are you highly attuned to the emotions and needs of others? Are you sociable, but also good at providing leadership? Those are just a few traits The Myers & Briggs Foundation says are indicative of an ENFJ, and which Anthony says would be a good match for the career of psychologist.
About the Career: There are various types of psychologists, says the U.S. Department of Labor. Some assess and treat people for emotional or behavioral problems, while others help people deal with problems at home or work.
Why It Could be a Good Match: Anthony says ENFJs - extroverts who use intuition - may make good psychologists, because they possess the following traits: extremely good people skills, loyalty and honesty, and strong organizational abilities. "In addition, ENFJ's generally are highly attuned to the emotions, needs and motivations of others, and can act as a catalyst for growth and change," she says.
How to Get Started: The education needs for different psychologists vary, from master's degrees in psychology for school and industrial-organizational psychologists to Ph.D.s in psychology for clinical, counseling, and research psychologists, says the Department of Labor.

Career #2: Human Resources Manager

Median Annual Salary:*
$99,720
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
$173,140
Botton 10 Percent of Earners:
$59,020
Are you extroverted, with a good intuition combined with the desire to make decisions based on logic and consistency? You may be an ENTP, which is a good fit for the career of human resources manager, says Anthony.
About the Career: Human resources managers often recruit, interview, and hire new staff, as well as serve as the liaison between management and staff, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Why It Could be a Good Match: "Some of the traits of the ENTP personality type would lend itself well to a human resources manager, such as outstanding communication skills, ability to solve problems, excellent people skills, and the capacity to read other people," says Anthony.
How to Get Started: Human resources managers usually need a bachelor's degree in human resources or business administration, says the Department of Labor.

Career #3: Software Developer

Median Annual Salary:*
$90,060
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
$138,880
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
$55,190.
Perhaps you’re a bit of an introvert, who enjoys organizing facts according to logic, along with solving complex problems, always staying open to new options. You could be an ISTP, a personality type that lends itself well to this career, says Anthony.
About the Career: Software developers are those creative types who design all those cool computer applications we love to use on our laptops, smart phones, and other computing devices, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
Why It Could be a Good Match: "The ISTPs are described as tolerant and flexible observers who are interested in how and why things work. They generally have a superb ability to apply logic and reason and are able to ‘troubleshoot.' I think these traits would work well in the career of a software developer," says Anthony.
How to Get Started: According to the Department of Labor, software developers usually have a bachelor's degree in computer science, software engineering, or a related field. A degree in mathematics may also be accepted, adds the Department.

Career #4: Event Planner

Median Annual Salary:*
$45,810
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
$79,270
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
$26,500
If you’re an extrovert who is bored by dry theories but loves acting energetically to solve problems, learn best by doing, and are considered spontaneous, you may be an ESTP personality type. You may also be a perfect fit for the career of events planner, says Anthony.
About the Career: Meeting, convention, and event planners coordinate every facet of occasions ranging from weddings and large parties, to business meetings and conventions, notes the U.S. Department of Labor. 
Why It Could be a Good Match: "Someone who has an ESTP type might make a good events planner due to the traits usually associated with this personality: flexible, adaptable and tolerant; action-oriented and resourceful; focused on results; and fast-paced and energetic," says Anthony.
How to Get Started: Many employers prefer applicants with a bachelor's degree and work experience in hotels or planning, notes the Department of Labor. These workers often come from a variety of academic fields, such as business, public relations, communications, and marketing.

Career #5: Engineer

Median Annual Salary:*
$80,580
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
$121,530
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
$52,030
If you're introverted, but also have an innate ability to see patterns in the external world, and possess a great drive to accomplish your goals, you could be an INTJ. You could also be a natural born engineer, says Anthony.
About the Career: There are of course many kinds of engineers, from civil to petroleum. One of the broadest engineering disciplines, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, is that of mechanical engineer. These professionals design, build, and test mechanical devices.
Why It Could be a Good Match: "Being able to absorb extremely complex material, logic and rational thought, creativity, innovation, and resourcefulness are all traits typically held by the INTJ personality type, and are traits that would be beneficial to an engineer," says Anthony.
How to Get Started: The Department of Labor says that virtually every entry-level mechanical engineering position requires a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering or mechanical engineering technology.

Career #6: Police Officer

Median Annual Salary:*
$55,270
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
$89,310
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
$32,350
If you’re an extrovert who is practical and forceful in implementing your plans, as well as seeing yourself as a guardian, you might be an ESTJ, which Anthony says sets you up nicely to pursue a career as a police officer.
About the Career: "Police officers protect lives and property," says the U.S. Department of Labor. Their duties include patrolling neighborhoods, arresting suspects, and, yes, filling out paperwork. Why It Could be a Good Match: "Sometimes called ‘The Guardian' personality type, the ESTJ would be a good fit for the responsibilities of a police officer. This personality type includes descriptors such as: decisive and quick to implement decisions; loyal and honest; follows a clear set of standards and beliefs by which they live; enjoy creating structure and order; and value security and tradition," says Anthony.
How to Get Started: Police officer applicants must have at least a high school diploma (or GED), but many departments and agencies require college coursework or a college degree, says the Department of Labor. Applicants must also graduate from their agency's training academy.

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