High-Earning Careers That Anyone Can Pursue

High-Pay Jobs Anyone Can Pursue

Not all high-earning careers require medical school or a Ph.D.

By Molly Marcot
If the job you're in right now is barely offering enough money to make ends meet, you probably wouldn't mind an upgrade.
Perhaps you've been putting off looking for something new because it seems like all the high-paying careers require advanced schooling like a master's degree, medical school, or a doctoral program.
However, you may be surprised at how many high-paying careers require only a bachelor's degree.
In fact, with the right college degree under your belt, you could find yourself on track to pursuing one of the high-paying careers below.

Career #2: Market Research Analyst

Find Degree Programs
Median
Annual Salary*
$60,300
Top 10%
of Earners*
More than $113,500
Bottom 10%
of Earners*
Less than $33,280
By evaluating market conditions, market research analysts study what factors will make a potential sale of a product or service successful and why, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. They predict sales and marketing trends, gather consumer and market data, and assess the effectiveness of marketing strategies.
High-Pay Potential: "A market research analyst is valued in the marketplace primarily because most of our businesses and most organizations are very data-driven," Key says. "It's about being able to connect the dots for the people above you and those technical people who may be putting together the product or service. You have to be able to see detail as well as see the big picture."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Administration Program.
How to Get Started: While the pay and the job might seem intimidating, you don't need a master's to get into this field. In fact, what's typically needed, per the Department of Labor, is a bachelor's degree in market research or a related field, such as business administration.

Career #3: Personal Financial Advisor

Find Degree Programs
Median
Annual Salary*
$67,520
Top 10%
of Earners*
More than $187,199
Bottom 10%
of Earners*
Less than $32,280
Personal financial advisors help busy people choose the best options for their money. The U.S. Department of Labor states that personal finance advisors research and recommend the plans for clients' financial goals pertaining to their insurance, taxes, and retirement funds.
High-Pay Potential: The amount of knowledge required for this career helps practitioners command a high salary. According to Key, "This is a continuous learning field. [Personal financial advisors] have to re-certify on a regular basis, which makes this career a high-paying job." Financial advisors are not only able to manage complicated math, but they also enjoy finding creative solutions to problems, as well as specializing in attention to detail, says Key.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Finance Program.
How to Get Started: If you have strong money management skills, you could be well-suited for this career. Only a bachelor's degree is typically needed for a personal financial advisor career, the Department of Labor says. Although employers don't require a specific field of study, according to the Department, one degree that could provide good preparation for this career is finance.

Career #4: Logistician

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Median
Annual Salary*
$72,780
Top 10%
of Earners*
More than $112,100
Bottom 10%
of Earners*
Less than $45,190
Are you good at puzzles and sorting things out? Logisticians try to ensure that all the pieces of a supply chain puzzle fit together so that the entire process, from acquisition to delivery, runs smoothly. The U.S Department of Labor states that logisticians use software systems to direct and track the movement of goods from suppliers to consumers. They suggest improvements to management and review the success level of logistical functions.
High-Pay Potential: Whatever the business, the logistician is responsible for making sure the production line doesn't break down, so he or she has a vital - and often well-compensated - role. "As a logistician, results count," Key says. "In business having what you need when you need it is critical, so logisticians working within a supply chain have important responsibilities, such as getting supplies like water and food to a storm area or products into a retail store to delight holiday shoppers."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Program.
How to Get Started: It may surprise you to learn that a logistician position is far from out of reach. In fact, some logistician positions may only require an associate's degree, according to the Department of Labor, while many others may require a bachelor's degree in business.

Career #5: Network and Computer Systems Administrator

Find Degree Programs
Median
Annual Salary*
$72,560
Top 10%
of Earners*
More than $115,180
Bottom 10%
of Earners*
Less than $44,330
If you're fascinated by computer systems, then network and computer systems administrator may be the job for you. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, network and computer systems administrators collect data to evaluate a system's performance so that improvements can be made. They are also responsible for installing hardware and software components, training staff members how to use system features, and solving network problems when issues arise.
High-Pay Potential: It shouldn't surprise you to learn that the people who make sure our computer networks run the way they are supposed to get paid well. Key states that, "Almost anything and everything today is running on a network, from our telephones to ATMs. Network and computer systems administrators must make certain all these computer systems coordinate correctly, which makes these jobs high-stakes and high-stress. When things work so well when we turn them on, we don't always understand what happens behind the scenes."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
How to Get Started: If you've got an interest in honing your problem-solving and computer skills, keep reading. This is another career that you don't need years and years of schooling to get into. The Department of Labor states that most employers require a bachelor's degree in computer or information science, and some may require just a postsecondary certificate.

Career #6: Aerospace Engineer

Find Degree Programs
Median
Annual Salary*
$103,720
Top 10%
of Earners*
More than $149,120
Bottom 10%
of Earners*
Less than $65,450
Do you dream of sending people and technology into space? The U.S. Department of Labor says aerospace engineers design and test out essential aerospace products such as missiles, satellites, and spacecraft. Responsibilities include evaluation of products for safety and quality, inspection of damaged products, and direction of product manufacture.
High-Pay Potential: "[Aerospace engineers] are in high demand because the aerospace manufacturing business is a huge market within the government and private companies," Key says. "From how our cars run to developing aircraft, there's a lot of application for aerospace engineering in a large number of industries."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Engineering Program.
How to Get Started: You might think you need to be a rocket scientist for a job as an aerospace engineer, but according to the Department of Labor, a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering or some type of engineering or science related to aerospace systems is what's usually needed. Depending on if the job pertains to national security, some security clearance may also be required.

6 Majors To Help You Pay Down Student Debt

Source: Yahoo
6 Majors That Pay Off

If you want to pay down your student debt faster, consider these majors that could help you prep to pursue some high-paying careers.

The price tag for college may give you serious sticker shock. And while many colleges offer students financial aid packages to cover the costs, hefty student loans could haunt you for most of your adult life.
If you'd like an actual number to wrap your head around, check out this figure. The cost of tuition, fees, room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and other expenses for one year at a public four-year, out-of-state on-campus institution averages $36,136, according to the College Board's 2013-2014 undergraduate budget report. If you go the private route, you could pay even more - a private non-profit, four-year on-campus degree averages $44,750 per year.
The good news is that while you may not have much control over how much your education will cost, you do get to choose your major. If you're still weighing your options of what to study, one thing you might want to consider is your potential job options after graduation.
To help, we took a look at six college majors that could prep you to pursue careers with some pretty solid earning potential.
Keep reading to learn more about the potentially high-paying careers you could pursue with these degrees.

Major #1: Business Management and Administration

Find Degree Programs A bachelor's in business administration could be a smart choice, because it gives students practical skills that can be applied across many organizations, says John Paul Engel, executive recruiter with Knowledge Capital Consulting and author of "Project Be the Change," a book featuring career and academic advice from successful people.
And demonstrating these skills in the workplace may quickly lead to additional responsibilities, including managing the work of others, according to Engel.
So what kind of practical skills make business majors so marketable? "Today's companies want students who can do more than run a spreadsheet," says Donna Rapaccioli, dean of Fordham University's Gabelli's School of Business. "They are seeking staff that can work in teams, write a compelling sentence, analyze persistent problems, and offer leadership."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Administration Program.
Additionally, business majors get real-world experience in their studies and learn how to tackle complicated ethical questions, says Rapaccioli. This kind of college graduate brings much more to the table, she explains.
Career Paths that Pay:* With a bachelor's in business administration, you could pursue a variety of professions. Perhaps you're interested in the people that make a business grow and succeed. Then you may want to consider a career as human resources manager, which has a median annual salary of $99,720, notes the U.S. Department of Labor. But if you enjoy the analytical side of business, then you may want to pursue a position as a market research analyst, which pays a median annual salary of $60,300.

Major #2: Computer Science

Find Degree Programs Thanks to market demand and an increased dependence on technology, a bachelor's degree in computer science is another major that could pay off.
"These majors create programs that may serve millions of people," says Engel. "As platforms continue to come online from PC to mobile to tablet, there is a strong demand for people who can code to create the apps we all depend on."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science & IT Program.
The U.S. Department of Labor adds that the industry of computer system design is expected to grow as a result of an increasing demand for new computer software. Looks like computer science majors may be primed to pursue high-earning opportunities in the field.
Career Paths That Could Pay:* A bachelor's in computer science could open multiple doors in the tech industry. If you speak computer and hold this degree, you could spend your days writing code for software programs as a computer programmer. These tech professionals have a median annual salary of $74,280, reports the U.S. Department of Labor. Or you could design communication networks, locally or globally, as a computer network architect and earn a median annual salary of $91,000.

Major #3: Mechanical or Electrical Engineering

Find Degree Programs Engineering is another major that could pay off. In fact, according to Engel, engineering skills are highly valued in today's world.
"These are the problem solvers of the world," Engel explains. "Engineers understand how things work, and they invent the future."
Today, engineers work on different types of projects, such as creating tiny robots to fit in the human body or developing new methods of breaking the sound barrier, according to the College Board, a non-profit organization committed to excellence and equity in education.
Career Paths That Could Pay:* There are as many careers for engineering grads as there are types of engineering. One lucrative option is a career as a petroleum engineer, which involves finding new ways to extract oil and gas from deposits under the earth's surface. These engineers have a median annual salary of $130,280, notes the U.S. Department of Labor. On the more electrical side of the profession, an electronic engineer develops everything from global position systems to music players and has a median annual salary of $87,920.

Major #4: Accounting

Find Degree Programs If you're not intimidated by numbers, then a bachelor's in accounting could be the right degree for you. Plus, you could pursue a career with a high salary. How could it pay off? An accounting major brings specialized skills and knowledge regarding taxes to an organization, says Engel.
"Most business failures occur because of poor accounting procedures," he explains. "A good accountant can give insight into business." Engel points out that all businesses and organizations need to file taxes, leading to a strong demand for these professionals.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Accounting Program.
Additionally, accounting majors have lucrative opportunities thanks to the regulatory requirements of certain businesses, according to Engel. "Publicly traded firms [must] have internal accountants and hire auditors," he says.
Career Paths That Could Pay:* A bachelor's in accounting could be applied in a range of roles and industries, some of which could pay a pretty penny. For example, a career as an accountant and auditor has a median annual salary of $63,550, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. These professionals are responsible for ensuring the financial operations of an organization run smoothly. A personal financial advisor role is another option with high-pay potential. These are the folks who give financial advice to people regarding investments, taxes, and other financial decisions, notes the Department of Labor. The median annual salary: $67,520.

Major #5: Marketing

Find Degree Programs With consumers becoming increasingly dependent on smartphones, laptops, and tablets for shopping, marketing majors have more opportunities than ever to identify consumer needs and trends. New grads with a bachelor's in marketing are valued and compensated well for their specialized knowledge, especially in the latest digital marketing techniques, says Engel.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Marketing Program.
"Marketing is a key ingredient in most organizations' sales," Engel explains. "With advances like Adwords and social media advertising, new graduates have technical skills that enable them to fill roles in this field that older counter parts may have trouble performing." And having that edge could not only translate into job opportunities but also high salary potential.
Career Paths That Could Pay:* A bachelor's in marketing can provide a great jumping off point for your career. With skills in analyzing market data and trends, a career as a market research analyst could be the right fit. The median annual salary for these analysts is $60,300, reports the U.S. Department of Labor. Further down the line, you could pursue a position as a marketing manager, which has an impressive median annual salary of $119,480.

Major #6: Finance

Find Degree Programs If you believe money makes the world go 'round, finance may be the right field to study. Plus, it could help prep you for a high-flying, not to mention high-earning, career.
While most finance majors never make it to the "big show" on Wall Street, says Engel, the ones that do can earn a lot of money.
"It is extremely competitive to make it to this level, though," Engel says. Graduates will usually need a CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) designation as well as the distinction of being a top graduate from a respected school. Beyond that, the key to a top-earning job in the field is the ability to network with the big players in finance, he explains.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Finance Program.
However, jobs for graduates with finance degrees aren't limited to Wall Street. The U.S. Department of Labor reports that "a growing range of financial products and the need for in-depth knowledge of geographic regions are expected to lead to strong employment growth."
Career Paths That Could Pay:* The sky's the limit with a bachelor's in finance. Picture yourself as a player in the stock market?  Securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents have a median annual salary of $71,720, notes the U.S. Department of Labor. Another option would be a financial analyst role, which involves assessing the performance of investments for businesses and individuals. Analysts have a median annual salary of $76,950, says the Department of Labor.

Majors with the Most Pre-Graduation Job Offers

Source: Yahoo

Best Degrees for Job Offers

According to a recent study, students in these degrees receive more job offers before graduation.

Earning a college degree takes time, effort, and money, so you want to be sure you choose the right major. If your goal behind earning a degree is pursuing a promising career, it might help to know which majors are more likely to generate job offers before you even complete your course of study.
Fortunately, there's actually data available to assist you in the decision-making process. "The College Class of 2013," published by the National Association for Colleges and Employers (NACE), surveyed close to 10,000 college seniors who were scheduled to graduate, and discovered that for five majors in particular, over half of the students had at least one job offer by the time they graduated.
Before you decide which degree path is for you, see which majors are the ones employers love and learn why.

Major #1: Bachelor's Degree in Computer Science

Find Degree Programs According to the NACE, an impressive 68.7 percent of computer science majors had at least one job offer by the time they graduated.
Why Employers Like It: It's hard to imagine life without computers, and our reliance on them is only growing. "As individual consumers, we're increasing our use of technology (the 'app economy') and businesses are tackling initiatives in areas including cloud computing, big data, and cyber security," says Robin Schooling, managing director at Silver Zebras, a human resources strategy company in Baton Rouge, La. And to meet this demand, Schooling says, "organizations must increasingly hire technology professionals."
"The whole economy operates on computer technology, and computer science majors know how to make that vast IT economy work - everything from programming to integration to security," explains Anthony Skjellum, a computer science professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. "As a result, companies like Google are offering $150,000 bonuses to programmers; Apple has a voracious demand for developers; and even mid-size and small companies are searching for people with computer technology skills."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
What You'll Study: Computer science majors learn programming languages such as C++ and Java, according to the College Board, a non-profit organization that links students to college success and opportunity. Computer science students may also take courses in data structures and algorithms, digital system design, and mathematics for computer science.
Potential Careers:*

Major #2: Bachelor's Degree in Economics

Computers aren't your thing? You could still find plenty of job opportunities to pursue with an economics major. Economics clocked in at number two in job offers, with 61.5 percent of surveyed students reporting they had at least one job offer by graduation.
Why Employers Like It: According to Schooling, economics is one of the most versatile of degrees. "Economics graduates learn to apply reasoning and analysis to a variety of societal, organizational, and business issues," says Schooling. "In a competitive environment, companies are looking for people who can provide economic analyses and forecast business trends."
What You'll Study: Students who study economics learn about economic theories and learn to dissect economic systems, says the College Board. It also reports that they may take such classes as econometrics, micro and macroeconomics, statistics, and international trade.
Potential Careers:*

Major #3: Bachelor's Degree in Accounting

Find Degree Programs The honor of third highest job offer rate goes to accounting majors, with 61.2 percent of seniors majoring in accounting reporting that they received at least one job offer by graduation.
Why Employers Like It: There are three primary reasons why accounting firms are hiring so many students, according to Ed Ketz, associate professor of accounting at Penn State University: "Accounting and audits are necessary in good times and bad, forensic accountants are needed to combat white collar crime and, given the Financial Accounting Standards Board's** requirements for fair value measurements, valuation services are expanding."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Accounting Program.
What You'll Study: Accounting students learn the skills necessary to record, analyze, and interpret financial information, reports the College Board. Typical coursework includes classes in auditing, cost accounting, tax accounting, and business law.
Potential Careers:*

Major #4: Bachelor's Degree in Engineering

Find Degree Programs Engineering had the fourth highest job rate, with 59 percent of students in engineering reporting receiving at least one offer of employment by graduation.
Why Employers Like It: "Engineering is one of the STEM degrees (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) experiencing a shortage of workers, so we'll continue to see a need for graduates in engineering disciplines," explains Schooling.  "In particular, there's a demand for biomedical engineers, petroleum engineers, civil engineers, and environmental engineers," she says.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Engineering Program.
What You'll Study: Engineering students learn to use math and science to solve problems, according to the College Board. Common courses include physics, engineering law, and numerical methods for scientists and engineers.
Various fields of engineering include chemical engineering, which involves learning how to put chemicals to work; mechanical engineering, which relates to the science behind machines; petroleum engineering, relating to methods of extracting oil and gas from the earth; and civil engineering, where students learn to use math and science to design construction projects, explains the College Board.
Potential Careers:*

Major #5: Bachelor's in Business Administration

Find Degree Programs A bachelor's degree in business administration rounds out the top five majors with the highest rate of offers, with 54.3 percent of seniors reporting at least one offer of employment by graduation.
Why Employers Like It: "Students who major in business administration have an opportunity to not only learn about the what and the how of commerce, but also the why, says Carolyn D. Davis, assistant professor of management in the department of business administration at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Ga. "And companies are looking for students who can discern the 'whys' of situations, because they can develop better solutions to problems in rapidly-changing environments."
Schooling agrees and adds that students with a solid business education have usually acquired knowledge they can bring to almost any industry, and as a result, they are in high demand and can choose from a variety of career options.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Administration Program.
What You'll Study: Business administration and management students learn how to direct an organization's activities, the College Board reports. This program includes coursework in operations and financial management, human resources management, and business ethics and law.
Potential Careers:*

Jobs That Pay More (And Less) Than You Think


Source: Yahoo
Jobs That Pay More Than You Think

You may think you know how much some jobs pay, but their actual salaries may surprise you and change your career path.

By Molly Marcot
If you're trying to figure out your career path, salary may be a major driving factor behind your decision on what to pursue. But you may be surprised to learn that some jobs pay higher salaries than you were expecting and vice versa.
According to Dr. Anthony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, paychecks for certain jobs reflect how they play into the economic landscape.
"The difference between these occupations and their salaries is largely about the value they provide to the economy," Carnevale says.
He adds, "We hold outdated information in our minds of what we think jobs pay, based on the people we know and talk to.
To dispel the myths you may have about certain jobs and their pay, take a look at the list of jobs below - some of their salaries may surprise you. And, even better, they could give you a clearer picture of what your next career move should be.

High-Pay Job #1: Systems Software Developer

Find Programs
Median Annual Salary*
$99,000
Top 10 Percent of Earners*
$148,850
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners*
$62,800
Creative types who enjoy problem-solving may find a career as a software developer to be a good fit and well-paid.
What They Do: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, software developer duties boil down to developing software systems for improved computer operations. Many developers work for computer system design companies or electronic product manufacturers.
Why It Pays: "[Software developers] invent new technical capabilities that harness the power of computers - the most productive technology of our era," Carnevale says. Because the demand for computer software is increasing, the Department of Labor projects 30 percent growth in software developer jobs from 2010 to 2020.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
How to Prepare: Software developers usually have computer programming skills alongside a bachelor's degree in computer science.

Low-Pay Job #1: Surgical Technologist

Median Annual Salary*
$41,790
Top 10 Percent of Earners*
$60,240
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners*
$29,710
For assisting in surgical operations, these important members of the health care team don't get paid as much as you would expect.
What They Do: The U.S. Department of Labor states that surgical technologists are responsible for preparing operating rooms, arranging equipment, and assisting doctors and nurses during surgery.
Why It's Low-Paid: Compared to other positions in the field such as nurse practitioner or physician's assistant, "[surgical technologists] require a lower medical skill set," Stoeckmann says. "Also there is a lot of pressure for hospitals to keep their costs down."

High-Pay Job #2: Dental Hygienist

Find Programs
Median Annual Salary*
$70,210
Top 10 Percent of Earners*
$96,280
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners*
$46,540
If you're interested in improving people's smiles, then a career as a dental hygienist might work well for you - professionally and financially. Now say "Aaaahhh!"
What They Do: Providing preventative dental care such as fluoride treatments and examining patients for oral diseases like gingivitis are typical responsibilities of dental hygienists, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Why It Pays: "Since dental hygienists oftentimes work in dental clinics that are privately owned instead of hospitals, companies are more likely to pay top dollar for a really qualified hygienist," says Jim Stoeckmann, senior practice leader at WorldAtWork, a nonprofit that offers insight on all aspects of human resources including compensation. "Private companies can afford to pay more than hospitals for the most part."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Dental Hygiene Program.
How to Prepare: The Department of Labor states that in order to pursue a career as a dental hygienist, you typically need an associate's degree in dental hygiene. All states require licenses to practice, but their requirements vary.

Low-Pay Job #2: Model

Median Annual Salary*
$18,750
Top 10 Percent of Earners*
$43,480
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners*
$16,250
Gracing the glossy pages of fashion magazines may seem glamorous and lucrative, but that may not be the case for most models.
What They Do: The U.S. Department of Labor states that models help advertise clothing or other products by posing for photos and participating in runway shows. Models often work with fashion designers, photographers, and advertisers.
Why It's Low-Paid: "Models are paid for performance, so their pay varies widely," Carnevale says. Plus, since they often do not work a typical 9-to-5 five-day workweek schedule, they are likely to experience some instability in income, the Department of Labor says.

High-Pay Job #3: Technical Writer

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Median Annual Salary*
$65,500
Top 10 Percent of Earners*
$101,660
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners*
$38,700
A wordsmith who can find ways to translate a complicated concept, such as how to operate factory machinery, into an accessible instruction manual may be well-suited for a lucrative career as a technical writer.
What They Do: Technical writing jobs require the ability to communicate technical information into an easy-to-understand format for the average person, the U.S. Department of Labor says. Technical writers work primarily within the technology, engineering, and scientific research industries, developing and distributing technical information to customers, designers, and manufacturers.
Why It Pays: Carnevale reiterates that "[Technical writers] work at a key junction between the people who make new technology and the people who need to use it or understand it. They explain or translate complex and technical concepts into common language; this critical function makes their position valuable."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Communications Program.
How to Prepare: Technical writer positions usually require a college degree, in addition to some type of knowledge in a specialty area such as web design or computer science, according to the Department of Labor. Employers typically prefer to hire writers with a degree in communications, English, or journalism.

Low-Pay Job #3: Announcer

Median Annual Salary*
$28,020
Top 10 Percent of Earners*
$78,630
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners*
$17,270
Announcers reach a wide audience through television or radio, so it may surprise you that these somewhat well-known personas aren't as well-compensated as you would guess.
What They Do: Announcers offer commentary on and present news, music, or sports and usually interview guests about their niche topics, the U.S. Department of Labor says. Their work environments are usually television and radio studios, and while most announcers work tight schedules on a full-time basis, many work part-time.
Why It's Low-Paid: "There aren't any significant prerequisites to this job," Stoeckmann says. "So you get a lot of candidates to choose from, and then media companies operate on fairly thin margins so they can't afford to pay that much."

High-Pay Job #4: Market Research Analyst

Find Programs
Median Annual Salary*
$60,300
Top 10 Percent of Earners*
$113,500
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners*
$33,280
Shopping is an everyday occurrence - but if you're curious about why people buy things, then pursuing a career as a market research analyst may be the right career move for you.
What They Do: Market research analysts work with companies to gather information about the potential sales of products or services in relation to a targeted area, such as a specified group of local communities or multiple state regions, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Their work is generally computer-oriented with frequent analysis of market data and reports, but some analysts work with the public to gather information needed for assignments.
Why It Pays: "The job does not altogether require a number of sophisticated skills, however market research analysts are a good example of the economic trend that's steering away from industrial jobs and instead focusing on service jobs," Stoeckmann says. "Business services continue to be a growing field." The Department of Labor also predicts a rapid 41 percent growth in the field from 2010 to 2020.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Administration Program.
How to Prepare: Market research analysts require a bachelor's degree in market research or a related field, such as statistics, math, or computer science, notes the Department. Others have studied business administration, communications, or one of the social sciences.

Is Your Dream Career Really Worth Pursuing?

Source: Yahoo

Dream career or nightmare?

Find out if these jobs will meet your expectations - or fall drastically short.

As children, we're primed to think about what we might want to be when we "grow up." For most, aspirations like astronaut or movie star are often given up along the way into adulthood for more practical, achievable options.
Then there are those who are still imagining the day they can make it big in their dream gig.
Perhaps you've held on to fantasies about certain careers, because they're flashy or highly respected. But how do you know if it's time to charge ahead or move on?
"A career is always worth it if you are honest with yourself and feel in your heart that it's right for you," says Danielle Mund, certified career and entrepreneur coach at daniellemund.com. "That said, all careers - even 'dream' careers - take a lot of hard work."
To help distinguish between fact and fiction of these so-called dream careers, we talked to career experts to get their take. Read on for five dream jobs - and how they stack up in reality.

Dream Career #1: Fashion Designer

Find Degree Programs Have you always dreamt about dressing the celebs you see strolling down the red carpet? Sure, it sounds glamorous and exciting. But what's this job really like?
Reality Check: Well, fashion isn't all about dreaming up pretty clothes and playing dress-up. There's a lot of hard work in fashion design that most people never see, says Tracy Brisson, founder of The Opportunities Project, a talent development, coaching, and recruitment consultancy agency.
"A career in fashion design may not be worth it if you are not eager to spend most of your time on business and marketing issues," Brisson says. "The best designers are people who are creative, but also spend a lot of energy branding themselves and building a profitable business," she adds.
Not to mention, employment of fashion designers is projected to decline three percent from 2012 to 2022, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, so competition will be fierce.
Alternative Career: Graphic Designer. Not interested in the fashion rat race? Graphic design is a great alternative to fashion design, says Ben Yeargin, a corporate recruiter for Craig Technologies, a system design company. In fact, graphic designer positions are predicted to grow 7 percent from 2012 through 2022, according to the Department of Labor.
"Graphic design is a career where you can still express your artistic freedom," says Yeargin. "Graphic designers enjoy many different roles, including making a website or marketing material really stand out."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Graphic Design Program.
How to Prepare: You'll usually be required to have a bachelor's degree in graphic design or a related field, says the Department. If you already have a bachelor's degree in a different area, you could pursue "technical training in graphic design" that could allow you to meet most hiring qualifications, according to the Department.

Dream Career #2: Chef

Find Degree Programs With celebrity chefs popping up all over the small screen recently, you may have imagined yourself in this dream job, too. But what are the ingredients that make up this career?
Reality Check: Like fashion design, this career is much more work than it seems on the surface, says Brisson. "Becoming a well-renowned chef requires years of training and requires you to develop an expertise in a specific cuisine to be marketable and earn what you deserve."
Along with all the training, there are some other drawbacks. Your work environment is always hot, you're working long hours, including weekends, and you rarely get to see the reaction of those that you're cooking for, Brisson adds.
"Shows like Top Chef make this career look incredible, but as Anthony Bourdain will tell you, it takes a certain type of person to love a career as a professional chef," says Brisson.
Alternative Career: Restaurant Manager. Not ready to give up your weekends to make someone else's dinner? Then, you may want to consider pursuing a career as a restaurant manager, also known as a food service manager.
Restaurant managers can work at different types of restaurants in many locales and earn a high salary as they build a reputation for being good at the business reputation, says Brisson. "They also have the opportunity to influence the guest experience in more ways than just through designing a meal," she explains.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Hospitality Management Program.
How to Prepare: While it's true that the U.S. Department of Labor says a bachelor's degree isn't required, some type of postsecondary education is increasingly preferred for many food service manager positions. Bachelor's degrees in restaurant and hospitality management or institutional food service management are offered in many colleges and universities.

Dream Career #3: Doctor

This is a classic dream career for children and often their parents, too. After all, the career seems to promise big paychecks and big responsibility. But what else does it prescribe?
Reality Check: Doctors are held in high regard in our society and for good reason, says Brisson. But that prestige comes with the high price of working long hours and giving up much of their personal lives to do their job well, she explains.
"Early on in your career as a doctor, you have to tackle the long commitment of a doctor's residency," she adds. "And even after that, you're always on call. It's impossible to walk away from the office or hospital and shut off completely."
Alternative Career: Registered Nurse. Does a career as a doctor sound a little daunting? Not to worry. Nursing is another way to get into the medical field that doesn't have to involve giving up all your free time.
"Registered nurses, especially those who specialize in specific areas such as high-risk labor and deliveries, are in-demand and compensated greatly for their expertise," Brisson notes. She adds that this is all without the harsh commitment of a doctor's schedule.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Registered Nursing Program.
How to Prepare: There are three common paths to pursuing a career as a registered nurse, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. You could earn a bachelor's of science degree in nursing, an associate's degree in nursing, or a diploma from an approved nursing program. You'll also be required to get your state license before you can work, says the Department of Labor.

Dream Career #4: Lawyer

Here's another typical dream career of kids and young adults alike that's often synonymous with high pay and prestige. But it takes hard work to make it to the top.
Reality Check: Getting a job as a lawyer in the United States is extremely competitive, with stories of new graduates defaulting on student loans due to lack of open positions, Brisson says.
The overall employment rate of lawyers has been on decline since 2008, according to the Association for Legal Career Professionals. For the class of 2012, it was 84.7 percent, which doesn't sound too dismal. But only 64.4 percent of those jobs required actually passing the bar, according to the Association.
Even if you do score a job, this career is a difficult one, warns Brisson. "Sometimes you're fighting on the side of someone or something you don't believe in, and just like doctors, the hours are sometimes unbearably long," she says.
Alternative Career: Paralegal. If you're not interested in a fancy law degree, paralegal is an alternative that still gets you into the legal field. Plus, it's a career that's projected to grow 17 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than average, reports the U.S. Department of Labor. And the growth doesn't have to stop at getting hired.
"In addition to specializing in a specific part of the legal process, you'll grow more quickly within the firm in a role as a paralegal compared to lawyers who may wait decades to become partner," Brisson explains.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Paralegal Studies Program.
While the bulk of paralegals' work is research, you may still get to experience some of the thrill of the courtroom. "Because you're the one doing the heavy lifting in the office, it's often rewarding to see your hard work at work for the client when you join the lawyers in court," Brisson adds.
How to Prepare: Another perk - paralegals don't have to spend the same long years in an undergraduate program and then law school. According to the Department of Labor, most paralegals have an associate's degree in paralegal studies. Those with bachelor's degrees in other fields and a certificate in paralegal studies may also pursue this career.

Dream Career #5: Chief Executive Officer

Find Degree Programs OK, you got us. CEO isn't really a career, it's more of a title. "No CEO has exactly the same role as any other CEO," says Mund. The title signifies that you've developed the ability to run an organization, she says. So what exactly does a CEO do?
"CEOs do everything from fundraising and making shareholders happy to leading teams to being extremely detail-oriented," explains Mund. "Or they can be the exact opposite: dreamers who can carry the organization's larger visions forward."
Reality Check: This is the only career on our list that our experts agreed might be worth it down the stretch. One major reason is due to the high level of customization available with this career, says Brisson. You could be running a small company or a large international organization. Although it depends on whether or not you're willing to put in the work to make it to the top of your field, she says.
If you're still on board, here's some advice for reaching that CEO position: Take every opportunity to become a leader of a project or team in your current profession, says Brisson. Additionally, learn about the functions of other departments.
Also, "think about using your leadership skills on a bigger stage with more risk and responsibility," advises Brisson. "That will give you a sense of whether the CEO job is for you or whether it makes sense to stay a specialist in your field."
Next step: Click to Find the Right MBA Program.
How to Prepare: Although education requirements may vary by industry and positions, you'll need at least a bachelor's degree and a considerable amount of work experience to pursue a top executive role, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Many of these professionals have a bachelor's or master's degree in an area related to their field or in business administration.

Jobs That You Could Do in Your Pajamas

Source: Yahoo

Work at Home Jobs

Interested in working from home? Take a look at these job possibilities.

Americans everywhere are dying to log on from home, and why not? Telecommuting can provide workers with the schedule that is typically reserved for those without a day job: flexibility, independence, and a life beyond work.
In fact, 73 percent of job-shoppers list flexibility as one of the most important factors considered when looking for their next position, according to the 2013 study conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of MomCorps, a professional staffing solutions and flexible career development firm.
This same study also showed that the trend of telecommuting is no longer limited to stay-at-home mothers: The millennial demographic is the most active in making this shift from the traditional workplace, with 84 percent of adults aged 18-34 years old reporting "at least some" flexibility in their current position.
"Because [young people] are the most technically savvy generation and come loaded with massive skills, much of the employment sector is bending over backwards to acquire these skilled workers," shares Jodi Olin, chief sales officer and co-founder of professional part-time placement service 10 Til 2.
However, if you're not a working mom or millennial, don't let this discourage you - this shift translates into new rules for everyone.
Ready to see which positions are the first to adapt to these changes? Here are five of our favorite potential at-home career paths.

Career #1: Graphic Designers

Find Degree Programs Do you have an eye for design? When trying to explain something to your friends, do you often find yourself drawing them a picture? Perhaps graphic design is for you. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, these professionals design visuals that are intended to communicate ideas to consumers. They can be found most commonly working in manufacturing, specialized design services, advertising, publishing, public relations, and related services.
Pajama Factor: Medium
If you want to call the shots and sport your PJs whenever you want, you might be in luck. According to the Department of Labor, 24 percent of graphic designers were self-employed in 2012. Of course, self-employed graphic designers may need to meet with clients in the evenings or weekends, adds the Department. For those who prefer a 9-to-5, you're in luck, too. The Department notes that some graphic designers do telecommute.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Graphic Design Program.
Pursue This Career: Typically, graphic designers need a bachelor's degree in this field. However, if you have a bachelor's in another subject, you can still pursue "technical training in graphic design."

Career #2: Accountants

Find Degree Programs If you have a love for numbers - as well as pajamas - consider pursuing a career in accounting. As an accountant, your job is to examine and prepare financial records such as tax returns and account books, says the U.S. Department of Labor. Accountants must also organize and maintain these records, and explain any findings from their examinations to their clients.
Pajama Factor: Low to High
Although meeting with clients to present findings may necessitate a trip through your closet, calculating financial records does not require a uniform. According to the Department of Labor, some accountants do work from home. Additionally, accountants with flexible schedules are quite popular when the IRS is lurking: "Accounting-related flexible jobs are [often] in high demand [during certain times] because of tax season," explains chief executive officer of FlexJobs, Sara Sutton Fell.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Accounting Program.
Pursuing This Career: Per the Department of Labor, most accountants will require a bachelor's degree in accounting or some related field at a minimum. Some employers would rather hire workers with a master's degree in accounting or a master's in business administration with a concentration in accounting, so consider these degrees if you wish to widen your options when pursuing an accounting career.

Career #3: Computer Support Specialists

Find Degree Programs Do you see yourself saving a company's computer network in your footy pajamas? An integral part of information technologies, or IT, these professionals are described by the U.S. Department of Labor as the go-to for computer users that make sure computer components of an organization are running smoothly.
The Department of Labor also notes that these specialists help analyze, troubleshoot, and evaluate computer software or equipment problems, with network support specialists helping out the IT employees in their organization, while computer user support specialists handle non-IT users with computer issues.
Pajama Factor: Medium to High
The Department tells us that many computer support specialists need to be available 24 hours a day, so getting the call when you're in your PJs may be inevitable. Furthermore, the Department reports that due to faster computer networks, some support specialists may be able to work from a home office, particularly help-desk technicians.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Information Systems Program.
Pursuing This Career: If this career sounds like your cup of tea, consider this: According to the Department, some computer support jobs require only an associate's degree or even just postsecondary classes. Others may require a bachelor's degree. For more technical positions, look to majoring in information science, engineering, or computer science.

Career #4: Management Analysts

Find Degree Programs Are you well organized and a master strategist? You might be fit for a role as a management analyst. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, management analysts are the folks who come up with ways to heighten the efficiency of the organizations they serve. They offer advice to managers on factors such as how to decrease costs and increase revenues.
Pajama Factor: Medium
A full 21 percent of management analysts were self-employed in 2012, according to the Department of Labor. The Department also points out that these analysts are free to choose when and where to work. Depending on what they choose, they may also be free to choose what (and what not) to wear.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Administration Program.
Pursuing This Career: To pursue a career as a management analyst, you'll probably need a bachelor's degree at a minimum, according to the Department, which also notes that candidates with an MBA may be preferable to some employers. Few schools offer management consulting programs, but the Department states that many fields may provide a suitable education. Consider fields such as business, accounting, finance, marketing, psychology, computer and information science, economics, political science and government, management, and English.

Career #5: Computer and Information Research Scientists

Find Degree Programs If you've ever marveled at the gadgets coming out of the Consumer Electronics Show, you might want to think about a career in computer and information research science. The U.S. Department of Labor tells us that creating computer algorithms and simplifying them for efficiency is typically one of the elements of a career in computer and information research, with data mining, robotics, and programming as some of the specialties in this position.
Pajama Factor: Low
Don't tell me you've never worked on your computer in your pajamas. The Department of Labor says that computer and information research scientists doing independent research could potentially find themselves with flexible work schedules.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
Pursuing This Career: Most jobs require a PhD in computer science or a related area, says the Department. If this type of work sounds like something you'd want to strive for, you'll need at least a bachelor's to get into PhD programs.

Preparing for a Telecommuting Job

While all five of these careers could potentially be done, at least in part, from the comfort of your own home, it's important to remain realistic about the implications of telecommuting. Disconnectedness, demonstrating productivity, and maintaining a solid work-life balance are all very real problems newcomers to telecommuting might face.
"This isn't a time where you'll want to employ the sink-or-swim method, but rather prepare beforehand to ensure success," advises MomCorp's chief executive officer, Allison O'Kelly.

Consider these three tips:

1. Get Your People Fix

"Being involved in a community is vital for your success because having a support system, readily available resources, and a variety of connections provides encouragement and companionship," O'Kelly explains.

2. Demonstrate Your Productivity

"Professionals often worry their supervisor will think they're at home watching TV and eating bonbons. And those who actually do that aren't helping the rest of us," shares O'Kelly. So how do we combat this? "Set protocols and train your brain to focus on work while at work," she says. "Yes, you can let the dog out or balance a couple quick tasks while working at home, but try to work as if you were still in the office to be as efficient as possible."

3. Work Out the Work-Life Balance

Typically, those working from home spend even more time behind their desks, making the possibility of work-life balance extinction all too real. Sutton Fell sums it up succinctly, "You do need to work at maintaining work-life balance because working flexible hours or from home can blur the lines between your work and personal lives." Whether this means tapping into the bounty of fresh vegetables in your garden for lunch, or meeting your kids at the bus stop, don't forget why you're opting to work from home. Ultimately, the control and freedom in your schedule can only be a benefit if you make it one.

Great Jobs You Can Get without a Bachelor's Degree

Source: Yahoo
High-Pay Jobs Without a Bachelor's

Want to find a job that pays well but don't have years and years to spend earning a bachelor's degree? You're in luck.

If you're looking to improve your annual salary but don't have a bachelor's degree, you may think you don't have a chance. Think again. The truth of the matter is that there are a number of occupations with high-pay potential that may only require an associate's degree - or less.
Ready to find out how you may pursue a job that doesn't necessarily require years of schooling and can still cushion your bank account? Then keep reading.

Career #1: Computer Network Support Specialist

Find Degree Programs
Median
Annual Salary*
$59,090
90th Percentile
of Earners
$96,850
10th Percentile
of Earners
$34,930
There was a time when only the wealthy, engineers, or people with PhD's had anything to do with computers. Those days are long gone. Computers are everywhere, and these days, you may have used a computer before you even learned to walk. That said, if you're good with computers and enjoy helping others, consider a career in computer support.
No Bachelor's Required: According to Tim Dugger, a career coach at Career Café in Indianapolis, Ind., "roughly half of all computer support specialists in this country do not have a formal degree and there are good reasons for that." He adds that many of the skills needed can be learned on the job or in subject-specific training classes.
The U.S. Department of Labor says that many employers accept candidates with an associate's degree. Just keep in mind that for some technical positions, the Department of Labor says that some employers might prefer those with a bachelor's degree in a field like computer science or information science.
More about the Job: Computer network support specialists typically perform duties such as troubleshooting networks (both LANs and WANs), and testing, evaluating, and maintaining network systems, says the Department.

Career #2: Dental Hygienist

Find Degree Programs
Median
Annual Salary*
$70,210
90th Percentile
of Earners
$96,280
10th Percentile
of Earners
$46,540
You don't have to be a dentist to help people care for their teeth. In fact, those who fear the sight of their local dentist may appreciate a friendly face in the examination room. If you like the idea of dentistry but don't have the means or the time for dental school, you may want to pursue a dental hygienist career, which is short on schooling requirements but offers a decent salary.
No Bachelor's Required: Shannon Ydoyaga, interim executive director at the health careers resource center for Dallas County Community College District in Dallas, Texas says an associate's program offers more than enough training for the supportive and preventative dental work a dental hygienist performs.
Indeed, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, an associate's degree in dental hygiene is commonly needed. Additionally, all states require a dental hygienist to be licensed.
More about The Job: The Department says dental hygienists not only clean teeth but look for signs of oral disease, as well as educate patients on proper oral hygiene.

Career #3: Diagnostic Medical Sonographer

Find Degree Programs
Median
Annual Salary*
$65,860
90th Percentile
of Earners
$91,070
10th Percentile
of Earners
$44,990
How would you like to show an expectant mother or father the first glimpse of their unborn child? That is an experience you may get to share as a diagnostic medical sonographer. But there is a lot more to this career, which is why it pays significantly well, despite requiring relatively little schooling.
No Bachelor's Required: The U.S. Department of Labor says that diagnostic medical sonographers need an associate's degree or postsecondary certificate. They do point out that most employers will require a professional certification.
One thing to keep in mind, per LaCheeta McPherson, executive dean of health and legal studies at El Centro College in Dallas, Texas, is that diagnostic medical sonography programs are limited, making admission very competitive. "Limitation of schools is due in part to the expense of offering the program. Equipment costs run well over $80,000 per instrument. Limitation of faculty and limitation of clinical sites, particularly obstetric clinical sites, are factors too."
More about the Job: Medical sonographers create pictures of the body's organs and tissues using specialized imaging equipment, says the Department of Labor. Upon doing so, they will interpret the images and provide a summary of findings to physicians.

Career #4: Web Developer

Find Degree Programs
Median
Annual Salary*
$62,500
90th Percentile
of Earners
$105,200
10th Percentile
of Earners
$33,550
Consider that when the first websites were created, there were no degree programs to teach anyone how to do it. Now think about web development geniuses like Mark Zuckerberg who never completed a bachelor's degree.
While you might not be in line to create the next multi-billion dollar website, you don't necessarily need a bachelor's degree to make a decent paycheck in this area either.
No Bachelor's Required: The U.S. Department of Labor says that an associate's degree in web design or in a related field is most commonly what is required, although education requirements range from a high school diploma to a bachelor's degree.
Dugger says that while obtaining a bachelor's degree in computer science with a concentration in database design and programming languages can significantly pay off in terms of job opportunities and future pay, it is certainly not required: "As long as they have the basic eye for design, form and layout, taking specific classes in Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Illustrator or WordPress can provide them with all the basic tools they need."
More about the Job: Do you have a good visual sense? That will be needed as a web developer, as they are responsible for a site's design and may create some of its content, says the Department of Labor. Web developers must also measure performance and capacity, which assesses the speed and amount of traffic the site can handle, adds the Department.

Career #5: Registered Nurse

Find Degree Programs
Median
Annual Salary*
$65,470
90th Percentile
of Earners
$94,720
10th Percentile
of Earners
$45,040
Have a soft spot for the sick, but aren't interested in spending eight years or more earning a medical doctorate? You may want to turn your compassion into a career as a registered nurse. You don't have to spend an eternity in school to break into this lucrative health profession.
No Bachelor's Required: While a bachelor's in nursing is certainly an option for would-be nurses, the U.S. Department of Labor also points to an associate's degree and a diploma (from an approved nursing program) as other options. You'll also need to get licensed. And Ydoyaga points out that many nurses are opting to choose specialties, which will require additional education.
More about the Job: Registered nurses (RNs) care for patients and also provide advice and emotional support to them and their family members, says the Department of Labor.

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