Six Careers With Six Figure Potential

Six-Figure Jobs

You could make more than just a decent living in these high-paying careers...

By Sarita Harbour
So you want to make top dollar doing something you love? You're not alone.
The good news is that there are quite a few opportunities out there with six-figure earning potential. But here's a dose of reality: Those extra zeros in your paycheck won't appear overnight and will depend on a variety of factors like locale and level of experience.
Of course every goal must have its starting point. Joining a company with high integrity, an excellent reputation, and potential for growth is a good place to start, says Michael Provitera, author of the book "Mastering Self-Motivation: Preparing Yourself for Personal Excellence."
"The key is to make two or three moves in your industry, either up the ranks in your current position or to jump ship and join a new company," Provitera says. Other significant factors in earning a hefty salary include your network of contacts and your job performance, he adds.
Are you ready to learn more about careers with $100K earning potential? We've compiled details on six careers where top earners have median annual salaries in the six-figures. Keep reading to learn more.

Career #1: Human Resources Manager

Top 10 Percent of Earners*
More than $173,140
Median Annual Salary*
$99,720
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners*
Less than $59,020
If you've got a combination of people skills and business savvy, then a career as a human resources (HR) manager could be your dream job. Those in this role may generally direct recruiting, interviewing, and hiring efforts, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
Why It Tends to Pay: The higher pay in this career is due to the strategic role human resources managers play in organizations, says Provitera. They tend to advise and collaborate with chief executive officers and other senior managers to ensure that business strategies are successful, he explains.
Provitera adds that the best way to reach a six figure salary as a human resources manager is to join a large company that needs organizational development and change.
How to Prepare: Consider earning a bachelor's degree in human resources or business administration. According to the Department of Labor, one of those degrees, combined with several years of related work experience, are needed for this position. Some higher-level positions require a master's degree in human resources, business administration, or labor relations, says the Department.

Career #2: Art Director

Top 10 Percent of Earners*
More than $162,800
Median Annual Salary*
$80,880
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners*
Less than $43,870
If life as a starving artist doesn't appeal to you, then consider applying your creativity in a career as an art director. As an art director, your responsibilities may include overseeing the visual style and images in newspapers, packaging, and movie and television productions, notes the U.S. Department of Labor.
Why It Tends to Pay: Art directors can work in a variety of settings and for diverse clients, notes the Department of Labor.
But the one constant is that their skills have the potential to pay off - in any medium. They have the ability to command high salaries, because they possess a great eye for design plus business smarts, says Provitera.
He also offers a few words of advice: Compile a list of clients that you have served and the art that you recommended to them in order to show the value of your advice and knowledge.
How to Prepare: You will need at least a bachelor's degree in an art or design subject along with work experience in an art or design occupation, says the Department of Labor. In fact, many art directors start out as graphic, industrial, and set designers, and usually have earned a bachelor of arts or bachelor of fine arts.

Career #3: Medical and Health Services Manager

Top 10 Percent of Earners*
More than $150,560
Median Annual Salary*
$88,500
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners*
Less than $53,940
If you're keen on working in the health care field but not on the front lines with patients, consider a career as a medical and health services manager. Also known as health care executives or health care administrators, these managers organize and plan medical and health services, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Why It Tends to Pay: Provitera says that medical and health services managers earn high incomes because of the growing demand for health care. That demand, according to the Department of Labor, is due to the aging baby-boomer population who will need medical services.
Medical health services managers are so highly valued because physicians place a great deal of reliance on them to coordinate and help treat the increased amount of people seeking health care, says Provitera.
How to Prepare: Look into earning a bachelor's degree or a master's. According to the Department, prospective health care executives should have a bachelor's in health services. Master's degrees in fields such as health services, public health, public administration, long-term care administration, and business administration are also common.

Career #4: Computer Systems Analyst

Top 10 Percent of Earners*
More than $122,090
Median Annual Salary*
$79,680
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners*
Less than $49,950
Your tech skills could translate well in a career as a computer systems analyst. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, these analysts use their understanding of business and information technology to improve current computer systems and procedures.
Why It Tends to Pay: "Computer systems analysts have such high earning potential, because they maintain the safety, security, and [performance] of the computer networks," Provitera says.
And since this field is constantly changing, the best paid professionals in this industry must continually learn and grow. "[You must] never let your skills become obsolete in a rapidly changing computer environment," he explains.
How to Prepare: While a bachelor's degree in a computer or information science-subject is common among computer systems analysts, according to the Department of Labor, it may not always be required. Some may hire those with business or liberal arts degrees and computer and IT skills, while others may prefer to hire applicants with a master's in business administration with a concentration in information systems.

Career #5: Accountant and Auditor

Top 10 Percent of Earners*
More than $111,510
Median Annual Salary*
$63,550
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners*
Less than $39,930
Have a love for numbers and money? If so, a career as an accountant or auditor may fit the bill. In this type of role, you might spend your days preparing and studying financial records for accuracy and to ensure taxes are correct and on time, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Why It Tends to Pay: Accountants and auditors know how and why numbers change and are able to predict future changes - making them valuable assets to employers, says Provitera.
Even more importantly, these professionals are responsible for presenting the bottom line. They establish important processes and ensure that a company is accurately reporting its revenue, which is essential for any business, he adds.
How to Prepare: Consider earning your bachelor's degree in accounting or a related area. According to the Department of Labor, that's what most positions require. Some employers may prefer those with a master's in accounting or business administration and an accounting specialization.

Career #6: Public Relations Specialist

Top 10 Percent of Earners*
More than $101,030
Median Annual Salary*
$54,170
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners*
Less than $30,760
Don't mind taking center stage or hobnobbing for a living? Well then a job as a public relations specialist could be the perfect career match. In this career, you might develop and maintain a positive public image for your employer or client, says the U.S. Department of Labor. Your workday may include writing material for media releases, helping your client communicate with the public, or evaluating advertising and promotion programs.
Why It Tends to Pay: Public relations specialists are well-compensated for protecting the image of the people and organizations that employ them, says Provitera.
And as with any client-based profession, it pays off to build an established track record and well-recognized reputation for success yourself, he adds.
How to Prepare: Typically, you would need a bachelor's degree in public relations, communications, business, journalism, or English to pursue this career, according to the Department of Labor.

How to survive a bad review or termination



Receiving a bad performance review or leaving a job on bad terms is a low point in anybody's career. However, by no means is your professional life tarnished. In fact, it can even be an opportunity to grow. While the circumstances of a bad review or termination can vary, how you react to either situation is key.
Read on to find out how to make the best of a bad review or how to address a bad termination in your job search.


In a bad review, get specific
If you find yourself in a review gone bad, it can be tempting to get emotional, defensive, angry or embarrassed. However, keeping your cool and remembering the purpose of a review is the first step down a path to improvement. "The focus of any evaluation should be feedback: telling employees what they do well and highlighting areas that need improvement," says Timothy G. Wiedman, associate professor of management and human resources at Doane College in Crete, Neb.

Instead of putting up a wall between you and your manager, participate in the review and try to get specifics about where the problem is and what needs to change. "For example, if an employee is told that his or her research reports are substandard, what does that really mean?" Wiedman says. "Is it a problem with the data collection or the spreadsheets, charts and graphs included in the report? Or is it a poorly written narrative that is full of grammatical errors, making it difficult to understand the implications of the analytical information?"
The key to recovering from a bad review is to show the employer that you understand his criticism and you're going to take action. "When the employee participates in the discussion during the evaluation, it indicates that he or she wants to make the effort to fix the problem," Wiedman says. "And since most good bosses are problem solvers, they will support an employee who is committed to improvement. But that employee must then demonstrate a genuine commitment to a workable improvement strategy. Just talking about improvement will not cut it."


After a bad termination, do damage control
While a poor review is enough to cause concern, leaving a job on bad terms can be problematic for your career if you don't take steps to remedy the situation. Whether you were completely to blame for the bad split or you believe your boss was, it's best not to rehash the dirty details in a job interview. Instead, address the issues in a professional, matter-of-fact way, focusing on your interest in the position and why you're a good fit.

"A multi-reason explanation is always best [when discussing why you left]," says Roy Cohen, career coach and author of "The Wall Street Professional's Survival Guide." "If one idea doesn't resonate, it is likely another will." Cohen suggests attributing your exit to a number of factors, such as preferring a better commute, looking for a role with expanded responsibilities and moving on after cuts to budgets and headcount. It's important to remain truthful, since references give employers the means to catch you in a lie. But keeping the conversation focused on the future instead of the past shows the employer that you're ready to move forward.
For instance, if a bad break-up with an employer is brought up through references or in the interview, demonstrate that you've moved on, learned from the situation and aren't bringing baggage to the new position. Cohen recommends this response: "'Yes, she is a tough boss but I learned a lot from her -- about setting and meeting exacting standards, working under pressure and following up. I learned from her that the devil is in the details. Those lessons were invaluable and I'm grateful for them.'"
Neither employees nor employers like to dwell on negative performance reviews or an uncomfortable termination. By making it clear that you understood the circumstances and have made efforts to improve, you're signaling to employers that you can take criticism well and you can grow in a role and make the needs of the business a priority.        

Six flexible degrees you can pursue after work

Six flexible degrees

Even if you work a full-time job, you can still pursue one of these six degrees after you've put in your hours.

By Andrea Duchon
Maybe you're a pro at balancing your work life, your social life, and your home life, but you're wondering how you can possibly fit school life into the mix. Did you know that there are a number of online degrees you can earn after clocking out at your full-time job?
"Studying online grants an opportunity for the student to pursue resume builders that come along with full-time jobs, such as significant job titles or prestigious company names," says Lyn O'Brien, career expert and co-owner of Your Hidden Advantage, a virtual service and training company that provides support to busy professionals.
She adds that a degree buoyed by the right work experience earns much more employer notice than a degree with no pertinent experience. So continuing to work while you earn your degree can actually be a good thing for your professional future.
Wondering which degrees you can pursue while still holding down your 9-to-5? Keep reading to learn about six online degrees that could fit the bill.

Online Degree #1: Graphic Design

Do you often look at design and think that you could do it better? Or maybe you're intrigued by how designers choose which fonts and colors to use on your favorite webpages? Perhaps you should consider earning an online bachelor's degree in graphic design while you work full-time.
According to the College Board, a non-profit organization committed to excellence and equity in education, a degree in graphic design teaches students the design and computer skills needed to create the overall look of books, magazines, and websites, among other types of media. They also note that graphic design students may take classes in things like the history of graphic design, Photoshop for designers, and typography.
Why It's Great for Full-Timers: Studying in the evenings after work allows you to observe design all day long, because graphic design is everywhere, says O'Brien. "You can carry a small sketch pad with you and jot down what really impresses you or what relates to your current online assignment for school."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Graphic Design Program.
And the advantage of doing it online versus in a traditional classroom setting, according to O'Brien, is that online learning gives you more freedom to be creative, because creative work is often much easier when things are quiet and you have few interruptions.
"You can find that optimal spot to work, crank up music that matches your assignment, and get those juices flowing," she says.
Potential Careers*:

Online Degree #2: Criminal Justice

If you've always had a knack for justice and helping out your community, perhaps there's a place for you in the criminal justice system.
When you pursue a degree in criminal justice, the College Board says you explore every aspect of the law and the justice system, as well as the ins and outs of law enforcement agencies. You might take courses like policing society, statistics, and juvenile justice.
Why It's Great for Full-Timers: O'Brien says this degree allows you to "earn while you learn," because many positions in law enforcement or security entail shifting schedules and nighttime hours. Online schooling allows you to both accommodate job demands and keep your studies moving forward.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Criminal Justice Program.
"Plus, you can practice in your live surroundings at your full-time job," she notes. "People-watching while conducting everyday business functions gives you the opportunity to observe behavior patterns without being observed."
Potential Careers:

Online Degree #3: Health Care Administration

Are you already working in the health care field and looking to take your career to the next level? Earning an online bachelor's degree in health care administration could position you to climb the ladder or get your foot in the door at a health care facility.
When you earn this degree, you'll focus your time on learning the ins and outs of overseeing health care facilities such as nursing homes, hospitals, and rehab centers, notes the College Board. They report that you'll likely take courses like health care law, economics of health care, and anatomy and physiology.
Why It's Great for Full-Timers: Online learning forces you to gather information outside the box of a classroom structure, O'Brien says. And that hands-on experience can complement your studies.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Health Care Administration Program.
"As fast as health care regulations change, few people in the industry can keep up," she adds. "You, on the other hand, have the luxury of pausing anytime to relate what you are learning to the current market. Additionally, your full-time experience will keep you more vibrantly current than any course of study can."
Potential Career:

Online Degree #4: IT and Information Systems

If you've paid attention to the digital shift happening all around us, you may also be aware of the work of IT specialists. By earning your bachelor's degree in IT and information systems online, you could prepare yourself to jump on the growing trends post-graduation.
But what can you expect to learn? The College Board says that in an IT program you might take common courses such as computer networking, web technologies, and introduction to computer science. During the program, you'll concentrate on how information and computing systems support business and communication needs.
Why It's Great for Full-Timers: "The more you explore the Internet and the more you keep up with new software developments and their equivalents, the more valuable you are," O'Brien says. "Take advantage of the opportunity to apply what you are learning online."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online IT and Information Systems Program.
And you can apply what you learn in the degree program while you're working during the day by using the same processes.
"Whether networking or programming, IT professionals excel when they understand systems from a helicopter view. Paying attention to workflow during your current job and helping to design better structures is not only good experience, it will also impress any current or future employer," she says.
Potential Career:

Online Degree #5: Business Administration

Whether you're looking to get started in the business world or you already hold a position with an organization, earning your online bachelor's degree in business administration could put you on the right track to climb the corporate ladder.
In fact, the College Board says earning this degree prepares you to plan and control an organization's activities. Along with operations management and accounting, they say other typical major courses could include business statistics, economics, and marketing.
Why It's Great for Full-Timers: By working a full-time job while earning your degree online after work, you can evaluate business practices from a customer viewpoint day in and day out, says O'Brien.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Business Administration Program.
"Every vendor, every service provider, professionals of any kind, and companies that you deal with every day in your job - they all give you opportunities to distinguish concepts you are learning in your online studies viewed through a customer's eyes. It's practical experience in learning."
And she says that learning online prepares you for managing people post-graduation. From identifying customers, communicating with staff, updating supervisors, and checking out the competition, research and organizational skills honed through online learning are a huge boon.
Potential Careers:

Online Degree #6: Accounting

If you've always had a passion for numbers and organization, earning your online degree in accounting could give you the opportunity to go back to school without quitting your full-time job.
But you'll go beyond just learning about how to file taxes, according to the College Board. They say that accounting majors learn how to gather, record, and interpret data about an organization's financial performance. You also may study things like business law and auditing.
Why It's Great for Full-Timers: Experience breeds higher salaries in this case, says O'Brien. While it's true that bookkeepers, auditing clerks, and small business accountants could find work with only a high school degree, earning an online degree in accounting puts you in a better position to demand a higher salary post-graduation.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Accounting Program.
"On-the-job experience in financial record-keeping counts, and experience with sophisticated enterprise software scores even higher with employers," she adds.
Plus, with the added complications of the e-business world, O'Brien says that researching online transactions as you study from the comfort of your home may make homework easier than if you were learning in a traditional setting, as you have the ability to explore right at your fingertips.
Potential Careers: 

Degrees that teach skills for in-demand jobs

Degrees that teach skills

These degrees can teach you valuable skills that could translate to on-the-job success.

By Terence Loose
Are you considering going back to school, but want to make sure you earn a degree that will give you in-demand, marketable skills that prepare you for a shot at a good career?
Well, good news. We did some homework that might just save you a little of your own.
First, we asked experts to weigh in on various popular bachelor's degree programs, telling us what marketable skills they might teach students. Then we matched those skills with careers that the U.S. Department of Labor predicts will have a higher than average growth rate from 2010 to 2020. That average, by the way, is 14 percent, according to the Department of Labor itself.
So read on to see what we found.

Degree #1: Computer Science

Here's a degree that teaches both specific and general skills that are applicable to a wide variety of careers, says David Bakke, an editor at MoneyCrashers.com, a career and financial advice website. And the coursework, while rigorous, does pay off in marketability, he says.
Earning the Degree: Typical classes taken by computer science majors might include digital system design, computer system organization, artificial intelligence, and data structures and algorithms, says the College Board, a nonprofit research organization that promotes higher education.
Depending on the specific program, Bakke says a computer science degree could teach any number of specific computer-related skills such as programming, data management, and graphics.
These programs also often develop students' analytic and problem-solving skills, as well as their ability to lead or be part of a team, working toward a common goal, he says. This is often how those new apps or software programs are developed, he says.
Potential Career:* Software Developer
Projected Job Growth, 2010 to 2020:** 30 percent
These are the creative minds behind those fancy computer and phone applications you have open in other tabs at the moment - which explains why the U.S. Department of Labor suggests the following skills for potential applicants: creativity, analytical ability, problem-solving, and teamwork.
The Department of Labor says that software developers typically have a bachelor's degree in computer science, software engineering, or a related field.

Degree #2: Health Care Administration

Whether you watch CNN, Fox News, or even Comedy Central, you've no doubt noticed a lot of talk about the future of health care. That's because it's the country's fastest growing industry and will be one of the biggest recruiters of college graduates in the next decade, says Anthony P. Carnevale, director of Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce.
Earning the Degree: Health care administration majors might study everything from accounting and health care law to health care ethics and epidemiology, says the College Board.
Debra Wheatman, a certified professional career coach (CPCC) and president of Careers Done Write, a career coaching agency, says this degree is valuable, because it teaches complex problem-solving and communication, as well as specific skills in areas like human resources and management.
"Graduates should come out with the ability to look at a problem from many different perspectives and come to a solution that is best for all parties," she says. In the case of the medical industry, that's important to employers, because there's a lot on the line - money, but also patients' health.
Projected Job Growth, 2010 to 2020: 22 percent
These professionals manage health care facilities large and small, says the U.S. Department of Labor. Problem-solving and communication skills are important in this career.
The Department of Labor also says that "prospective medical and health services managers have a bachelor's degree in health administration." However, they also note that master's degrees are also common, in fields such as health services, business administration, public health, public administration, and long-term care administration.

Degree #3: Business Administration

Here's a perennial favorite degree that offers a very eclectic set of skills, says Ryan S. Himmel, president and CEO of BIDaWiz, Inc., a financial advice website and company. He says that's because the coursework in this degree covers a broad range of business topics.
Earning the Degree: The College Board says a business administration and management major typically takes a course load that might include operations management, financial management, economics, business ethics and law, and marketing.
"Some skills you'll get with this degree are management, communication, and analytical skills," adds Himmel. "And these are key to success in the management of any business."
Potential Career: Financial Analyst
Projected Job Growth, 2010 to 2020: 23 percent
These finance experts study stocks, bonds, and other types of investments and make investment recommendations to businesses and individuals, says the U.S. Department of Labor. They say it is important for these pros to have analytical, communication, decision-making, and other similar skills.
The Department of Labor says a bachelor's degree in business administration, accounting, economics, finance, or statistics is required for many financial analyst positions.

Degree #4: IT and Information Science

With Big Data - the accumulation of massive amounts of information about consumers by large companies - fast becoming the buzz word in the big business world, a degree in information technology (IT) or information science could be very valuable, says Bakke.
Earning the Degree: IT majors could take courses such as computer networking, computer systems and architecture, systems analysis and design, and web technologies.
Bakke says some of the key skills you'll acquire in these classes and by pursuing this degree are information storage and database management - two things crucial to working with Big Data.
Other, equally important skills Bakke says IT students pick up are analytical, problem-solving, and teamwork skills.
Potential Career: Computer Systems Analyst
Projected Job Growth, 2010 to 2020: 22 percent
These tech-savvy pros help make more efficient and productive computer systems for companies, says the U.S. Department of Labor. They add that it is important for computer systems analysts to have analytical, creative, and teamwork skills.
The Department of Labor says most of these professionals have a bachelor's degree in a computer-related field.

Degree #5: Accounting

Looking for a practical degree that offers real-world skills that will be in demand for the foreseeable future? Look no further than a bachelor's in accounting, says Susan Heathfield, who has more than two decades of experience in the human resources field and writes for About.com.
Earning the Degree: The College Board says an accounting major typically takes classes like business law, cost accounting, government and not-for-profit accounting, and accounting information systems.
"This degree is in my top three for giving skills employers are looking for," says Heathfield. She does have one caveat: Because the entire world is now reliant on computers, accounting majors should gain computing skills as well as the more traditional accounting skills.
Math, organizational, communication, and interpersonal skills, are a few of the in-demand skills this degree provides, she says. "Following the financial crisis, accountants are now very important to companies and need to be able to communicate risks to management clearly," she says.
Potential Career: Accountant
Projected Job Growth, 2010 to 2020: 16 percent
Accountants not only make sure a company's financial books are in order, they also prepare taxes and sometimes offer financial advice to management, says the U.S. Department of Labor. The Department of Labor says these pros should have analytical, communication, organizational, and other similar skills.
While a bachelor's degree in accounting or a related field is needed for most accountant positions, some employers might prefer those with a master's degree in accounting, or in business administration with a concentration in accounting, says the Department.

What College Degrees Produce the Most Millionaires?

Majors Popular With Millionaires

A new study reveals the most common college degrees among millionaires.

By Terence Loose
If you're trying to decide on a college major, you could do worse than pick one that's popular among millionaires. After all, college is an investment - one you hope will pay off. And a million times or more would be nice.
So you may be interested to know that a new study by an international wealth consultancy group, WealthInsight, in association with Spear's magazine, assessed roughly 70,000 millionaires worldwide (people with a net worth over $1 million) to see what college degrees they held. Surprisingly, college dropouts, like Mark Zuckerberg or Steve Jobs, didn't skew the data as much as one might think - only about one percent of millionaires in the study did not obtain a college degree.
Of course, you'll want to keep in mind that while the study found these degrees to be most common among millionaires, that doesn't mean just anyone who studies one of these majors will get the same result.
All that said, without further ado, we present the degrees most earned by millionaires.

Degree #1: Bachelor's in Engineering

An engineering degree, according to the WealthInsight study, has resulted in more millionaires worldwide than any other. If you believe in making the world a better place through innovation, you might be interested in pursuing this degree as well.
Why It Could Pay Off: Engineering majors could make a very good salary right out of college, says Anthony P. Carnevale, director of Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce. In addition, he says, engineers are innovators, which means they have the ability to create new and valuable products that, if combined with an entrepreneurial spirit, can result in a lot of success.
Potential Career Path:* Mechanical Engineer. These engineers design, build, and test mechanical devices like tools, machines, and engines, says the U.S. Department of Labor. Mechanical engineers have a median annual salary of $80,580, according to the Department of Labor. Not millionaire status, but certainly not bad.

Degree #2: Master in Business Administration (MBA)

The objective of business is to make money, so it would make sense that an MBA is number two on the millionaire degree list, according to the WealthInsight study. It's also the top graduate degree among millionaires. So if you'd like to refine your business smarts, then you might want to add an MBA to your roster, too.
Why It Could Pay Off: Carnevale says that if you are already in business and pursue an MBA, it has the most potential for payoff. He adds that those who concentrate on finance, business economics, or accounting will gain the most from this degree. "This degree is designed to help people lead companies," he says, "and that usually pays off."
Potential Career Path:* Financial Manager. These professionals plan and direct the financial arm of organizations to ensure they remain successful and healthy, says the U.S. Department of Labor. And while this occupation may not have you sitting upon millions of dollars yourself, you may still be able to make a substantial pile of green. Financial managers have a median annual salary of $109,740, reports the Department of Labor.

Degree #3: Bachelor's in Economics

With economics coming in third on the WealthInsight list, these majors do indeed make great millionaires. If studying the trade of goods and services in our economy appeals to you, then you might want to consider majoring in economics - you'd be in good company.
Why It Could Pay Off: "Economics is a powerful degree, because it's very practical and flexible. It arms you with a deep knowledge of how buying and selling works. With it, someone can go into any number of businesses or can start their own with confidence," says Lisa Adams, career management coach and founder of Fresh Air Careers, a career coaching firm.
Potential Career Path:* Budget Analyst. These professionals help both public and private organizations organize their finances by analyzing and strategizing budgets, says the U.S. Department of Labor. While this role is all about the flow of money, don't assume you'll be getting your millionaire membership card. Budget analysts have a median annual salary of $69,280, notes the Department of Labor.

Degree #5: Bachelor's in Business Administration

Another win for business administration - this time at the bachelor's level. Sure enough, this major ranks fifth on WealthInsight's list of most popular degrees earned by millionaires. And if you'd like to learn the fundamentals of business, this may be the right degree for you, too.
Why It Could Pay Off: People with business administration degrees tend to be highly successful, because they're usually very driven and have a true entrepreneurial spirit, says Susan Heathfield, a management consultant and author of About.com's Guide to Human Resources. "And a business degree gives them a good, broad understanding of the basics of business and how to build successful companies. It's a good base for branching out into any industry," she says.
Potential Career Path:* Human Resources Manager. These professionals oversee such things as an organization's recruiting, hiring, and training of employees, says the U.S. Department of Labor.  And while this career wouldn't realistically make you a millionaire, it still has the potential to pay pretty well. The Department of Labor reports that human resources managers have a median annual salary of $99,720.

Degree #6: Bachelor's in Accounting**

The major of commerce ranked sixth in the WealthInsight study, but it's mostly offered at universities outside of the U.S. So if you don't plan on studying abroad anytime soon, you may be more interested in the next degree on the list - accounting - which came in at seventh.
Why It Could Pay Off: Accounting is a major that can result in ample personal wealth for some obvious reasons, says Heathfield. She points to the fact that accounting at the college level teaches individuals more than just number-crunching, but also about how to build wealth, create greater profits at companies, and how to negotiate complicated tax law.
Potential Career Path:* Accountant. These whizzes prepare and examine financial records, make sure taxes are prepared and paid, and help organizations run efficiently, says the U.S. Department of Labor. Although your paychecks may be lacking those extra zeros to make you a millionaire, this career still has the potential to pay a pretty penny. Accountants have a median annual salary of $63,550, according to the Department of Labor.

5 Jobs That Are Big On Pay - and Here To Stay

Soure: Yahoo


High Pay Jobs On The Rise

Check out our picks for high-paying jobs that are on the rise.

By Danielle Blundell
Believe it or not, some jobs are going the way of the dinosaurs. And the worst part about it? When it comes down to brass tax, some of these endangered jobs are well-respected, desirable, and high-paying to boot. So what's a job seeker to do? Well, the best defense against extinction may be simpler than you think.
"If you can pinpoint what you like to do, show that you're good at it, and find an opportune way to monetize it - a market need - that's the ideal," says Dana Leavy-Detrick, a New York City-based career consultant at Brooklyn Resume Studio, a company offering professional career consulting services.
Point taken, but to go a step further, it also may be helpful to identify - and avoid - some of the careers that are no longer in demand in the job market. These "endangered" jobs may have impressive salaries, but don't let that fool you. They are also in decline and projected to continue on that path for the foreseeable future, at least according to the U.S. Department of Labor and our career experts.
So, read on for our list of cautionary careers and alternatively, high-paying positions that are in demand.

High-paying jobs that are disappearing…

Career #1: Air
Traffic Controllers


Median Annual Salary:*
$122,530
Projected Job Growth from 2012 to 2022:**
1 percent
You may want to proceed with extreme caution if you're thinking about pursuing this career path. While the job pays well, be warned…
Technology is taking over more of the controller's duties in directing planes in and out of airports, says Tim Dugger, owner of the counseling firm Career Café. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Labor projects very little job growth for this career.

High-paying jobs that are growing…

Career #1: Industrial-
Organizational Psychologist

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Median Annual Salary:*
$83,580
Projected Job Growth from 2012 to 2022:**
53 percent
If you're analytical and enjoy helping others, consider a career in industrial-organizational psychology. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, as an industrial-organizational psychologist, you might use psychological principles and research methods to solve problems and improve the quality of work life. Collaborating with management on employee screening or training and policy planning might also be a part of your scope of responsibilities.
Why It Could Be a Better Choice: The field is growing, because these psychologists help businesses run smoothly. "[This job] is about addressing issues like productivity, diversity, and employee retention - helping companies create more effective workplace cultures," says Leavy-Detrick. And in turn, this increases a company's potential for profit - which all businesses want, she adds.
And the career could pay well, says Dugger, because corporations recognize the real monetary advantages of effectively matching people to roles that improve their productivity.
Next Step: Click to Find the Right Psychology Program.
Education Requirements: According to the Department of Labor, you can work as an industrial-organizational psychologist with a master's in psychology.  For most master's programs, you don't need an undergraduate major in psychology. But you will need coursework in introductory psychology, experimental psychology, and statistics, says the Department.

Career #2: Software
Developer (Applications)

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Median Annual Salary:
$90,060
Projected Job Growth from 2012 to 2022:
23 percent
If you're creative and tech-savvy, you may want to check out a career as a software developer. In this role, you could be the mastermind behind the newest software and apps for computers and mobile devices, says the U.S. Department of Labor. Your job could also involve creating computer programs, testing them for glitches, and debugging them.
Why It Could Be a Better Choice: STEM jobs like this pay well, largely due to the fact that there aren't enough trained people to fill the existing roles, says Dugger.
As far as growth goes, according to Leavy-Detrick, software developers fulfill the needs of the business world, which is becoming increasingly global. "Companies are becoming increasingly web-based, and they need the types of talent who can build products, services, and organizations around that trend," she says.
Next Step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
Education Requirements: According to the Department of Labor, these professionals usually have a bachelor's in computer science, software engineering, or another related field. Mathematics is also accepted by employers.

Career #3: Power Plant
Operators


Median Annual Salary:
$66,130
Projected Job Growth from 2012 to 2022:
-11 percent
Power plant operators are responsible for delivering power into people's homes and businesses. And as you can imagine, their work could potentially impact tens of thousands of people, which accounts for their high pay, says Dugger. But with technology easily supplying power remotely, fewer workers are needed in this field, he explains. The negative growth in this profession, reported by the U.S. Department of Labor, reflects that decline.

Career #3: Medical and
Health Services Manager

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Median Annual Salary:
$88,580
Projected Job Growth from 2012 to 2022:
23 percent
If you're after a job with both high growth and high pay potential, then this is another profession to consider. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, these professionals are often in charge of planning and coordinating care at a hospital or doctor's office. In this role, you could be responsible for managing an area or department, creating staff schedules, and staying abreast of your facility's finances.
Why It Could Be a Better Choice: "This one is all about demographics," says Dugger of the high salaries and high growth in this field. "The aging baby boomer population will necessitate the growth of health care services offerings. And someone has to manage and lead all those medical practitioners."
Next Step: Click to Find the Right Health Care Administration Program.
Education Requirements: According to the Department of Labor, "prospective medical and health services mangers should have a bachelor's degree in health care administration." Master's degrees are also common in fields such as health services, business administration, public health, public administration, and long-term care administration.

Career #4:
Fashion Designer


Median Annual Salary:
$62,860
Projected Job Growth from 2012 to 2022:
-3 percent
Glamorous, check. High-paying, check - well, at least for the top fashion designers who clothe celebrities. But with more entrepreneurs starting independent labels, competition is fierce, says Leavy-Detrick. And the fight for success may not be worth it, considering that the U.S. Department of Labor notes that the growth in this field is on the decline.

Career #4:
Financial Analyst

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Median Annual Salary:
$76,950
Projected Job Growth from 2012 to 2022:
16 percent
If you love watching money grow, then you might want to pursue a career as a financial analyst. In this profession, you may often provide clients and businesses with recommendations on investment opportunities, says the U.S. Department of Labor. Your role might involve studying economic trends and evaluating historical data to make monetary suggestions.
Why It Could Be a Better Choice: According to Dugger, financial analysts are well-paid and on the rise, because "early career investors as well as corporations will all depend on the services of financial analysts services for maximizing returns and navigating government regulations."
Another reason for the uptick here: "In addition to medical services, boomers will need someone they trust to watch over their accumulated investments while they get to go enjoy their retirement years."
Next Step: Click to Find the Right Accounting Program.
Education Requirements: Typically, the Department of Labor says, financial analysts must have a bachelor's degree. Some areas of study to consider include accounting, business administration, engineering, economics, finance, math, and statistics. Advanced positions, notes the Department, may often require a master's degree in business administration or finance.

Career #5:
Farmers and Ranchers


Median Annual Salary:
$69,300
Projected Job Growth from 2012 to 2022:
-19 percent
Back in the day, farmers and ranchers were the backbone of this country and commanded top-tier salaries, particularly after a good harvest. Nowadays, it's a different story. In fact, the U.S. Department of Labor projects that nearly 180,000 jobs will be lost from 2012 to 2022. The problem? New farming technologies have led to higher yields - and a need for fewer workers on the farm, says Dugger. So unless you're inheriting a well-established family farming business, best to stick to something that's on the rise.

Career #5:
Dental Hygienist

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Median Annual Salary:
$70,210
Projected Job Growth from 2012 to 2022:
33 percent
Interested in helping people preserve their smiles? Then this career might be the in-demand option for you. As a dental hygienist, you might clean and examine teeth, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. You may also be tasked to educate patients on how to improve their oral health.
Why It Could Be a Better Choice: According to Dugger, this field has seen significant recent growth, because dental health has been increasingly tied to overall physical health. Again, the aging population comes into play - resulting in high demand and high compensation for people entering this field.
Next Step: Click to Find the Right Dental Hygiene Program.
Education Requirements: These professionals usually need an associate's degree in dental hygiene, according to the Department of Labor. Additionally, all states require them to have a license.

How To Switch To An $80K Career

$80K Careers

With such impressive salaries, these careers may be worth pursuing.

By Danielle Blundell
With all the competition in the current job market, it may seem like you should settle for any old low-paying job. But why sell yourself short when there are opportunities out there with better potential?
Not sure where to start? You're in luck. We've compiled a list of job options that have a median annual salary of $80,000 or more. Just keep in mind that reaching these career heights won't happen overnight.
Still interested in learning more? Keep reading for details on six careers with high-pay potential.

Career #1: Applications Software Developer

Median Annual Salary:*
$90,060
Top 10 Percent of Earners:*
$138,880
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:*
$55,190
Can't put down your laptop or iPhone? A career in software development might be right up your alley.
What They Do: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, these developers are the masterminds behind the software that we use on computers, tablets, smart phones, and more. In addition to designing applications, they also test software to make sure it functions correctly.
Why It Could Pay: Lynn Kindler, a Texas-based career coach, saw software developers making excellent money in her past as a professional recruiter. According to Kindler, this was due to the specialized skills it takes to create software for any given company.
How much you make depends on your level of expertise with various tools and platforms, she says. This knowledge allows someone to take on more responsibility - which is why it's well-rewarded. "Your work can mean a matter of making or breaking a project," Kindler explains.
How to Prepare for the Switch: The Department of Labor says these professionals usually have a bachelor's degree in computer science, software engineering, or a related field. Math degrees are also acceptable.

Career #2: Medical and Health Services Manager

Median Annual Salary:
$88,580
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
$150,560
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
$53,940
With the introduction of Obamacare, the medical industry's gotten even more complex. If you're interested in how to keep things running smoothly, you may want to learn more about the medical and health services management profession.
What They Do: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, planning and coordinating medical and health services is the chief concern of these professionals. Creating schedules, staying up to date on laws and regulations, and controlling finances are also often part of the gig.
Why It Could Pay: The specialized nature of their work requires both knowledge of the health care system and business savvy, says Kindler.
How to Prepare for the Switch: "Prospective medical and health services managers should have a bachelor's degree in health administration," says the Department of Labor. Master's degrees in fields such as health services, business administration, public health, public administration, and long-term care administration are also common.

Career #3: Elementary, Middle, or High School Principal

Median Annual Salary:
$87,760
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
$130,810
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
$58,530
If you place a high value on learning and have some teaching experience, you might want to put school principal on your list of careers to consider.
What They Do: Principals might be responsible for everything from overseeing the operation of an entire school to evaluating the efficacy of teachers to meeting with parents to discuss students' behavior, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
Why It Could Pay: Principals often take home high pay, because the position carries the huge responsibility of being a leader, according to Kindler. Principals are responsible for creating an effective environment where students can learn successfully - which is no easy task.
How to Prepare for the Switch: According to the Department of Labor, most schools require principals to have their master's degrees in education administration or leadership. Candidates usually need teaching experience as well.

Career #4: Financial Manager

Median Annual Salary:
$109,740
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
$187,199 or more
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
$59,630
If you believe money makes the world go 'round, then you may want to steer your career path toward a role as a financial manager.
What They Do: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, financial managers generate financial reports, strategize long-term financial goals, and look after an organization's financial health.
Why It Could Pay: Financial managers make big money, because they have the right stuff - meaning they know how to interpret the economy and make smart investments - explains Kindler. Additionally, they possess the necessary interpersonal skills to work with clients.
Of course, in order to be successful and well-compensated, she says, candidates will either be exceptionally talented in regards to numbers, people, or ideally, a little bit of both. She adds that personal recommendations and referrals will also factor heavily into how much you earn in this profession. "The more you distinguish yourself by the companies and people you align yourself with, the better," she says.
How to Prepare for the Switch: At minimum, financial managers often need a bachelor's degree - in accounting, business administration, economics, or finance - and five or more years of experience in a related area, says the Department of Labor. The Department also notes that nowadays, many employers want candidates to have a master's degree in business administration, economics, or finance.

Career #5: Human Resources Manager

Median Annual Salary:
$99,720
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
$173,140
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
$59,020
If you're a people-person and feel comfortable speaking with almost anyone, a career in human resources management might be a good fit for you.
What They Do: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, human resources managers typically serve as a link between an organization's employees and management team, mediating conflicts and hiring new staff.
Why It Could Pay: For Kindler, it's a combination of education, people skills, and prior management experience. Things can get tense when your main task is handling a company's most important, and often most volatile, asset - its employees.
She adds that taking on more responsibility regarding legal issues in the workplace, such as the immigration status of employees or employee disputes, could help you reach the high-pay potential of this career.
How to Prepare for the Switch: Several years of related work experience and a bachelor's degree in human resources or business administration is needed, says the Department of Labor. For some higher-level positions, a master's degree in human resources, business administration, or labor relations is required, says the Department.

Career #6: Nurse Practitioner

Median Annual Salary:
$89,960
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
$120,500
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
$64,100
If you want to make a career out of helping people, you may want to look into the profession of nurse practitioner.
What They Do: Responsibilities vary by state, but these practitioners might be responsible for performing physical exams, diagnosing health problems, and prescribing medications, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
Why It Could Pay: According to Nicholas Dillon, a Wisconsin-based professional career and life coach, the field of nursing requires expertise that commands higher salaries. Practitioners, according to the Department of Labor, also need specialized graduate education, which can also drive salaries for this position up.
How to Prepare for the Switch: The Department says nurse practitioners must earn at least a master's degree from an accredited program. However, they also note that they must first be a licensed registered nurse. And what's the path for an RN licensure? According to the Department, nurses must pass the National Council Licensure Examination and graduate from an approved nursing programs. RNs usually pursue a diploma from an approved nursing program, an associate's in nursing, or a bachelor's in nursing. 

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