5 Behind-The-Scenes Jobs That Pay Well

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High-Pay, Behind-The-Scenes Jobs

You don't have to be the center of attention to bring home the bacon. Check out these low-profile jobs with high-profile salaries.

You may think that if you hate the spotlight, you're doomed to make low wages. But you'd be wrong. In fact, there are plenty of careers where you could thrive behind the scenes and still earn an impressive salary.
"Being in the spotlight is not what commands a high salary, generally," says Joanne Deck, a success coach and owner of Nurture You, a career, social, and academic coaching company. "It's having knowledge, skills, and expertise that are in demand."
Intrigued? Keep reading to learn more about  five low-profile jobs with high salaries.

Career #1: Writer

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Median
Annual Salary
$57,750*
Top 10 Percent of Earners
>$117,050*
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners
<$28,310*
If you love the written word, you might want to opt for the life of a writer. In this career, you might spend your time developing written content for advertisements, books, magazines, movie and television scripts, songs, and online publications, notes the U.S. Department of Labor.
Behind-the-Scenes, High-Pay Factors: According to Deck, writing is essential in every field in some way, and it's always taking place behind the scenes in an office setting or at home for freelancers. Your interactions may largely be limited to working with your editors, unless you make it big time and have to interact with fans or the press, says Deck.
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It's important to keep in mind that while it's possible to make a lot of money as a writer, it's not always the norm. You have to set yourself apart to earn the big bucks, says Deck. "Writers that are well-paid are either very talented, prolific, or possess an expertise that is in demand, such as editing or technical knowledge."
How to Get There: Ready to pursue this career? According to the Department of Labor, you'll typically need a bachelor's degree for a full-time writing position. Many employers prefer applicants with degrees in communications, English, or journalism.

Career #2: Systems Software Developer

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Median
Annual Salary
$101,410
Top 10 Percent of Earners
>$63,140
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners
<$150,760
The online world is the perfect environment for those who like to keep a low profile. Imagine a job where you could immerse yourself in code all day long. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, you'd spend your days doing just that - building and testing the systems that run devices and networks.
Behind-the-Scenes, High-Pay Factors: Most of the work that goes into developing software takes place behind the scenes, typically without interacting with the customer base and users, says Tara Goodfellow, career coach and owner of Athena Educational Consultants, Inc., a full service career firm spanning entry-level job seekers to C-level executives.
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"It's behind the scenes as you're not the one selling the software or dealing with business development. You are the brains behind the project," explains Goodfellow. And since this job is a highly skilled position, those required credentials and tech skills drive salaries up, Goodfellow adds.
How to Get There: Ready to be the brains behind a device or network? Keep in mind that these developers usually need a bachelor's in computer science, engineering, or a related field, reports the Department of Labor.

Career #3: Human Resources Manager

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Median
Annual Salary
$100,800
Top 10 Percent of Earners
>$177,460
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners
<$58,780
Are you interested in helping a company run smoothly from the background? Then you might want to pursue a career as a human resources manager. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, you'd be responsible for hiring staff, advising managers on organizational policies, and handling any staff issues.
Behind-the-Scenes, High-Pay Factors: While it's true that a human resources manager works with people, it could still be a good fit for your personality depending on your comfort level. According to Deck, "HR touches every aspect of a business, beginning before the doors open and ceasing after the doors lock for the last time, but a lot of those tasks are focused on the internal workforce as opposed to the public."
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Deck adds that the requisite skills and ever-changing social landscape of HR have made wages rise over the past few years. "HR laws can be very complex and vary based on geographic location, job title, and industry, and workers are responsible for being on top of that," Deck says. "The field also involves technical expertise and excellent communication, negotiation, and human relations skills."
How to Get There: Does this job sound like a good match for your low-key personality?According to the U.S. Department of Labor, you'll usually need a bachelor's in human resources or business administration to pursue a career as a human resources manager. In addition to education, candidates need several years of related work experience to pursue this career.

Career #4: Computer Network Support Specialist

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Median
Annual Salary
$60,180
Top 10 Percent of Earners
>$99,810
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners
<$35,330
Would you prefer to work with technology people? If so, a career as a computer networks support specialist position might be the right match for you. In this role, the U.S. Department of Labor says you might test and evaluate network systems and perform regular maintenance to ensure networks operation correctly.
Behind-the-Scenes, High-Pay Factors:  "It's a low-profile career, because unlike a banker or a teacher, you rarely see a network support specialist until something is wrong with your system. Otherwise, this position maintains the system so the users never knew there was a problem to begin with," says says Kat Clowes, educational consultant and CEO of March Consulting.
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As for why it pays well, employers must offer a high salary for these positions in order to lure qualified candidates with desirable skills over from more flashy tech positions or companies, explains Clowes.
How to Get There: Ready to pursue this tech-savvy support role? Good news: According to the U. S. Department of Labor, while you do need some computer knowledge, a college degree isn't necessarily a must. While it's true that some employers prefer candidates with a bachelor's, many accept those with an associate's degree. More technical positions will probably require a degree in computer science, engineering, or information science.

Career #5: Market Research Analyst

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Median
Annual Salary
$60,800
Top 10 Percent of Earners
>$114,250
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners
<$33,490
Interested in the world of marketing but don't necessarily want to be in the public eye? Consider a more behind-the-scenes position as a market research analyst. In this job, you might be responsible for monitoring and forecasting marketing and sales trends and gathering data about consumers, competitors, and market conditions, according U.S. Department of Labor.
Behind-the-Scenes, High-Pay Factors: According to Goodfellow, market research analysts can keep a pretty low profile in the job because they're the analytical pros connecting the dots for marketing management.
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And because market research analysts provide "essential information that in turn will generate revenue for the company," Goodfellow says that connection to the bottom line has lead to competitive salaries.
How to Get There: Does a job as a market research analyst sound like it's in your wheelhouse? These analysts usually need a bachelor's in market research or a related field, says the Department of Labor. Many have degrees in fields such as computer science, math, and statistics, while others have backgrounds in business administration, communications, or the social sciences.

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