Degrees for People Who Are Over Going to Class

Source: Yahoo

Avoid Class with These Online Degrees

These online degrees are perfect for those who prefer to learn alone.


Have you always hated school because of unpleasant commutes, bad-tasting cafeteria food and germ-filled classrooms? Do you have bad memories of oversleeping the day of an exam, or having to attend class when you were sick?
Well, online learning may be a solution for those who have no patience for attending class in person. In fact, online degrees can be ideal for people who prefer sitting behind the keyboard to sitting in class, hate burning fuel to drive to school, and dislike searching for parking spaces and purchasing parking permits, according to Dani Babb, an online education expert and founder of online education service provider TheBabbGroup.com.
Babb also says that online learning provides diversity and an opportunity for students to work at their own pace.
Of course, online education is not for everyone, and some students may perform better with a more rigid schedule and face-to-face interaction. If you prefer to learn alone, and you do better when you're left to your own devices, you may wish to consider one of the following six online degrees.

Online Degree #1: Bachelor's in Finance

Find Degree Programs If you're more comfortable around money than people, you may want to consider parlaying your love for numbers into earning an online bachelor's degree in finance.
Typical courses include accounting and statistics for financial analysis, financial markets and institutions, and analysis of financial statements, according to the College Board, a non-profit that links students to opportunity and success in college.
Why It's Better if You're Over Class: "Many finance classes are software-based," says Curt Bonk, a professor of instructional systems technology at Indiana University, who is also the author of "The World is Open: How Web Technology is Revolutionizing Education," and e-Book "Adding Some TEC-VARIETY: 100+ Activities for Motivating and Retaining Learners Online."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Finance Program.
Bonk adds, "Since the information can be learned remotely, this degree is appealing to people who don't want to commute to a classroom."
Potential Career* Median Annual Salary**
Personal Financial Advisor $75,320
Financial Analyst $78,380

Online Degree #2: Bachelor's in Graphic Design

Find Degree Programs If you're a person with an eye for creativity, who is more likely to spend classroom time staring out the window looking for interesting visual ideas than listening to a droning professor, consider pursuing an online bachelor's degree in graphic design.
According to the College Board, courses in graphic design may include production design, Photoshop for designers, and the history of graphic design.
Why It's Better If You're Over Class: "The format of graphic design courses makes this degree a good online choice, according to Joe Chapman, director of student services at Arizona State University Online. "Students learn web development and interactive technologies, computer illustration and digital publishing, photography for online delivery and other technologies relevant to the cross-media nature of the graphic information industry."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Graphic Design Program.
Additionally, the nature of a traditional graphic design classroom is that the teacher can only go about as fast as the slowest student, which could get boring in a hurry if you're a quick study. "Taking an online graphic design class may allow you to work at your own pace," says Babb.
Potential Career* Median Annual Salary**
Graphic Designer $44,830
Art Director $83,000

Online Degree #3: Bachelor's in Computer Science

Find Degree Programs If computers are your thing, you're already engaged with the most important online learning tool you could need. Instead of just using a computer as an aid to learning, you could make it the focus of your education by pursuing an online bachelor's degree in computer science.
The College Board lists artificial intelligence, data structures and algorithms, and software engineering as possible classes you may take along the way.
Why It's Better If You're Over Class: "An online bachelor’s degree in computer science provides students with the expertise to design, select, implement and administer computer-based information solutions,” says Chapman.
Chapman also points out that there is an emphasis in online programs on creating web applications and websites, adding, "These activities can be performed at home just as well as they can in a classroom setting."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Computer Science Program.
And while you may think that online computer science students are simply swapping long periods of time sitting in front of a teacher for long periods of time sitting in front of their computers, Babb points out, "With an online degree, you don't have to sit on a hard classroom chair for several hours. You can work from the comfort of your living room or some other cushy location."
Potential Career* Median Annual Salary**
Computer Programmer $76,140
Software Developer, Applications $92,660

Online Degree #4: Bachelor's in Engineering

Find Degree Programs A solid background in math and science, combined with a strong desire to design solutions to small and large problems may serve you well outside the classroom setting if you pursue an online bachelor's degree in engineering.
The College Board lists scientific visualization, geology and geophysics for engineers, and numerical methods for scientists and engineers as possible classes.
Why It's Better If You're Over Class: "This degree integrates the fundamentals with practical real-world experience in an online environment," says Chapman. "Students take a variety of fundamental courses along with specialty courses in analog and digital circuits, electromagnetic fields, microprocessors, communications networks, solid-state electronics and electric power and energy systems. Although there are labs, most of the time, students are learning remotely."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Engineering Program.
And if you need to contact your engineering instructor, Babb says you don't have to wait days on end for the weekly preset office visitation times. "Most professors are required to check email at least 24 to 36 hours, and most of us check our email all day long." Babb says that online professors take questions via Twitter, Facebook, and text message also.
Potential Career* Median Annual Salary**
Industrial Engineer $80,300
Materials Engineer $87,330

Online Degree #5: Master's in Business Administration

Find Degree Programs If you like the idea of putting business management skills to work for you, but don't really see that happening on campus, consider pursuing an online master's in business administration (MBA).
Students tackle a variety of subjects, including finance, accounting, organizational behavior, economics, and management, according to the Princeton Review, which helps college-bound and graduate school-bound students achieve higher-education goals with test-preparation services, online resources, admissions resources, and tutoring.
Why It's Better If You're Over Class: "Many people who pursue an MBA online are already in the workforce and don't have a lot of time to commute to class," says Bonk. "An MBA involves business theory courses, which can be learned online, as opposed to degrees with labs or other types of course requirements that would necessitate being on campus."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Business Administration Program.
And while many MBA students "may be sitting in a classroom with students from their hometown with little diversity and the same faces every day, that won't happen online," says Babb. "You're likely to be working with students from all over the country and even all over the world, gaining real world experience."
Potential Career* Median Annual Salary**
Human Resources Managers $100,800
Computer and Information Systems Manager $123,950

Online Degree #6: Master's in Education Administration

Find Degree Programs If you'd rather be organizing the classes one day than sitting in them, an online master's degree in education administration might be the one for you to pursue.
 In this major, you may learn international perspectives on education, the basics of organizational change, and the fundamentals of management, according to the Princeton Review.
Why It's Better If You're Over Class: Education administration students are typically full-time teachers looking to advance their career, but they don't want to turn around and sit in a classroom all night after teaching classes all day, says Meredith Toth, assistant division director of online programs in the division of educational leadership and innovation at Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Education Administration Program.
"Taking classes online provides professionals the opportunity to develop their knowledge and skills while also working full-time in their current position," says Toth.

Jobs That May Be Slipping Away - And Those That Are Here To Stay

Source: Yahoo
Jobs That May Be Slipping Away - And Those That Are Here To Stay

Is your job safe from computerization? Keep reading to find out...

According to a 2013 Oxford study entitled "The Future of Employment: How Susceptible Are Jobs To Computerisation," 47 percent of total U.S. unemployment could see job loss or a decrease in employment due to technological advancements. What's a worker to do?
"Job seekers should follow the wisdom of hockey great Wayne Gretzky who said, 'I skate to where the puck will be, not where it is,'" says Steve Langerud, a workplace consultant and managing partner of career guidance organization Steve Langerud & Associates, LLC in Grinnell, Iowa.
The key lies in figuring out which jobs are going away and which jobs are growing - and then preparing to pursue what's poised to thrive.
If you're worried that there's no way to protect yourself from the inevitable loss of your livelihood to automation, there's good news. The Oxford study also found that the more education you have, the less likely it is that your job will be computerized.
With that in mind, we've highlighted six jobs that may be slipping away according to the study, along with six high-growth alternatives to consider pursuing.

Career That's Slipping Away #1Postal Service Clerks

Likelihood of Computerization: 95 percent
Before email and online postage sites, most people couldn't communicate without these workers. Postal service clerks are the people who sell money orders, stamps, envelopes, and other mailing-related products, along with calculating postage and answering postal questions, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Bleak Outlook Factor: As automated bill pay and email use increases, the subsequent decline in first-class mail volume will adversely affect employment, says the Department of Labor. Eric Miranda, a career counselor at CollegeAdmissionsReview.com, agrees.
"The volume of mail going through the postal system has decreased over the years with the increased use of email," says Miranda, "That's not going to change. More people are emailing documents - and mailing letters less."
This may be why employment of postal service clerks is projected to decline 32 percent from 2012 to 2022, representing a loss of 139,000 jobs.*

Career That's Here To Stay #1Human Resources Managers

Find Programs Likelihood of Computerization: 0.55 percent
The unsung heroes of virtually any company with more than a handful of employees, human resources managers coordinate administrative functions for an organization. They interview and hire staff, consult with top executives, and serve as a link between management and the workers, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Brighter Outlook Factor: One thing a computer can't replace is human interaction, and human resources managers' jobs are all about human interaction. "While technology will assist HR managers in doing their jobs, I don't see a total elimination of HR staff happening anytime soon," says Amanda Haddaway, career expert and author of "Destination Real World: Success after Graduation."
"As compliance and employment law have taken center stage, there's still a need for human interpretation and application that a computer just simply isn't capable of yet."
The statistics seem to confirm this. Employment of human resources managers is projected to grow 13 percent from 2012 to 2022, adding 13,600 new jobs.*
Next step: Click to Find the Right Human Resources Program.
Preparing For This Career: Interested in this field? According to the Department of Labor, you'll usually need a bachelor's degree in human resources or business administration, although an alternative is to complete a bachelor's in a different field and take courses in subjects related to human resources like organizational development, industrial psychology, or labor or industrial relations.
The Department also notes that experienced individuals with backgrounds in areas such as business management, finance, information technology, and education can fill some positions, and that for higher level jobs, a master's degree in labor relations, human resources, or a Master of Business Administration degree are sometimes required.

Career That's Slipping Away #2Motion Picture Projectionists

Likelihood of Computerization: 97 percent
You've sat in a dark room with them many times, even if you've never seen them... Motion picture projectionists are responsible for the setting up and operation of motion picture projection equipment and related sound reproduction equipment, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
Bleak Outlook Factor: At the dawn of the industry, motion pictures were massive reels of film that needed to be hand-loaded into projectors. But with the advancement of technology, more and more movie houses are turning to digital projectors, which don't require the same kind of labor from a projectionist.
"Digital formatting is quickly replacing film, reducing the need for projectionists," says Peter Berner, founder and president of Pilot Workplace Advisors, a specialty human resources development firm. "Even film projection is easily programmed and delivered without the need for human attendants. In addition, more and more people are opting to receive motion picture content on their personal digital equipment, further shrinking the economic viability of the big screen experience."
These advances in viewing technology are expected to continue to hurt this field, which had already dwindled down to a mere 7,630 workers according to May 2013 data. Employment of these workers is expected to decline by 26.5 percent from 2012 to 2022, a loss of 2,100 jobs.*

Career That's Here To Stay #2Network and Computer Systems Administrators

Find Programs Likelihood of Computerization: 3 percent
Network and computer systems administrators install an organization's computer systems, networks, and other data communication systems, as well as providing organization and support, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Brighter Outlook Factor: While we might rely on computers to handle more and more of our job responsibilities, we will need people to oversee those computers. This is where the network and computer systems administrators come into play, according to Patrick O'Rourke, who is responsible for talent acquisition and development at IT Consulting firm SWC Technology Partners, Inc.
"I believe that network and computer systems administrators will continue to be the backbone of IT operations, because the human element of troubleshooting, escalating, and communicating these issues on the fly cannot be fully automated," says O'Rourke, "The need for qualified professionals that draw upon experiences and consider the human element of IT remains a top priority when assessing an organization's overall IT health."
That need for the human element may be one of the reasons that this career is projected to enjoy 42,900 new jobs, representing growth of 12 percent from 2012 to 2022.*
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
Preparing For This Career: If you're interested in prepping to pursue this career, consider earning your bachelor's degree in a field related to computer or information science, which is what most employers require for this job, according to the Department.
The Department does say that some employers require only a postsecondary certificate, and a degree in electrical engineering or computer engineering is usually acceptable too.

Career That's Slipping Away #3Embalmers

Likelihood of Computerization: 54 percent
An embalmer is probably the last person you want to meet, and he might end up being just that. Embalmers are the professionals who prepare human remains for burial, making sure to conform with legal requirements, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Bleak Outlook Factor: Considering the fact that death is a part of every life, you might not think the need for embalmers would decrease over time. However, both the Oxford study and the Department of Labor numbers suggest decreasing opportunities for this field, and it's only partly due to technological advancements.
It may also be people's preference for cremation that is leading to the anticipated loss of jobs for embalmers. "While technology is not the main cause of a diminishing need for embalmers, societal trends certainly are," says Berner. "More and more people are opting for cremation as an acceptable, if not preferred, form of interment."
Not even an embalmer can make this profession look good. It's already down to 4,390 workers according to May 2013 data, with an anticipated loss of 800 jobs, a 15 percent drop, from 2012 to 2022.*

Career That's Here To Stay #3Registered Nurses

Find Programs Likelihood of Computerization: 0.9 percent
Who doesn't feel all warm at the sight of a caring nurse? Registered nurses (RNs) care for patients, consult with doctors, and provide emotional support and advice to patients and to their family members, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
Brighter Outlook Factor: Considering the amount of person-to-person interaction, and the emotional support they offer to both patients and their families, RNs should be around for a long time to come.
"There's no substitute for the power of touch, the ability to listen, and even the capability of sharing real tears (of joy or sorrow)," says Sandra Davis, an RN with MJHS Hospice and Palliative Care, which cares for pediatric and adult patients in NYC. "Nursing is far more than medical check-ups or taking temperatures and blood work. It's conversation, guidance, interacting with family members and even providing (or helping someone access) social, emotional, spiritual, psychological support. This is particularly important for nurses who provide care in patients' homes."
It seems we need that support more than ever. Registered nurses are projected to add a whopping 526,800 positions, growing 19 percent, from 2012 to 2022.*
Next step: Click to Find the Right Registered Nursing Program.
Preparing For This Career: If you're interested in preparing to pursue this career, the three usual education paths are an associate's degree or bachelor's of science degree in nursing, or a diploma from an approved nursing program, the Department of Labor states.

Career That's Slipping Away #4Locomotive Engineers

Likelihood of Computerization: 96 percent
Remember playing with toy trains as a kid? These kids never outgrew it. Locomotive engineers drive the locomotives that transport passengers or freight. They interpret the railroad rules and regulations and read electronic and manual train orders and signals. The locomotives these engineers drive may be electric, steam, diesel electric or gas-turbine-electric, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Bleak Outlook Factor: While many people have a fascination with trains, the opportunities to work as a locomotive engineer could be fading over the next several decades - partly because of advancements in technology.
"Jobs with repetitive tasks that are done the same way over and over are going away, and that could extend to the job of the locomotive engineer," says David Harder, founder of Inspired Work, Inc., whose mission is to find innovative solutions to career problems. "We will see automation taking over anything that can be replicated in a safe manner."
But, he stresses, "safe" is the key. "Until artificial intelligence reaches the point where it can anticipate crises and respond better than a well-trained human being, I don't see locomotive engineers being completely replaced."
Maybe not completely replaced, but they're disappearing nonetheless. Only 36,860 locomotive engineers remain according to May 2013 data, and the future projection is for a four percent drop in employment of locomotive engineers from 2012 to 2022, which translates into a loss of 1,500 jobs.*

Career That's Here To Stay #4Computer Systems Analysts

Find Programs Likelihood of Computerization: 0.65 percent
Your company's computer efficiency is probably in the hands of one of these workers. Computer systems analysts study an organization's existing computer systems and procedures and figure out what information systems solutions will help the organization to operate more effectively and efficiently, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Brighter Outlook Factor: Computer systems analysts do what a computer can't do - employ human observation and reasoning to improve the way an organization uses technology to meet their goals. "Not many people have the technical skills and interpersonal skills needed for this type of work," says Stuart Mease, director of career advancement and employer relations at the Virginal Tech Pamplin College of Business and author of "The Perfect Job Seeker."
According to Mease, computer systems analysts provide businesses with crucial information on how technology can aid employees to better handle their workload. "These people are critical moving forward," he adds. So critical, in fact, that employment of computer systems analysts is expected to grow 25 percent from 2012 to 2022, adding 127,700 new jobs.*
Next step: Click to Find the Right IT & Information Systems Program.
Preparing For This Career: To prepare to pursue a career in this field, a bachelor's degree in a computer or information science field is common, although it's not always a requirement, says the Department. Some firms may hire an analyst with a business or liberal arts degree along with skills in information technology or computer programming, the Department says.
In addition, some employers do prefer applicants with a master of business administration with a concentration in information systems, or, for jobs that are more technically complex, a master's degree in computer science may be the more appropriate degree.

Career That's Slipping Away #5Printing Press Operators

Likelihood of Computerization: 83 percent
Those of us old enough to remember when people actually read more books than computer screens should appreciate the printing press operator. Printing press operators set up and operate all kinds of printing machines, including short-run offset printing presses, digital, gravure, letterpress, flexographic, and lithographic machines, the U.S. Department of Labor explains.
Bleak Outlook Factor: Due to advances in digital technology, more and more of what we read exists online, and that is having an impact on printing press operators. "The advent of digital media has demolished the need for printed material," says Berner. "The struggles of the newspaper industry alone demonstrate the diminishing need for press operators." But jobs are even being lost at successful printing houses, he adds. "Many of the remaining jobs in the print industry are rapidly being eliminated by more sophisticated equipment that is controlled by computerized technology."
The numbers bear out Berner's analysis, with the number of opportunities for printing press operators expected to drop 3.9 percent from 2012 to 2022 - which means a loss of about 7,000 jobs.*

Career That's Here To Stay #5Petroleum Engineers

Find Programs Likelihood of Computerization: 16 percent
Petroleum engineers are on the front lines of the energy battle. They figure out how to extract oil and gas from deposits below the earth's surface or from older wells, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
Brighter Outlook Factor: As we try to become more environmentally conscious, we still rely heavily on the old ways of harnessing power. "Despite worldwide efforts to utilize alternative energy, fossil fuel demand will continue to rise as supplies become harder to locate and extract," says Berner.
"Technology will certainly play an increasing role in the production of petroleum products, but it will function as a tool of engineers, enhancing their capabilities; not as a substitute for the fundamental engineering expertise needed for success in the industry."
Our continued reliance on fossil fuels may be one of the reasons that it is projected that we can expect employment of petroleum engineers to jump 26 percent from 2012 to 2022, adding 9,800 new jobs.*
Next step: Click to Find the Right Engineering Program.
Preparing For This Career: To pursue a career in this field, you must have a bachelor's degree in engineering - preferably in petroleum engineering - to get started, according to the Department of Labor. A bachelor's in chemical engineering or mechanical engineering may be sufficient as well, notes the Department.

Career That's Slipping Away #6Watch Repairers

Likelihood of Computerization: 99 percent
If you've heard the expression "runs like clockwork," you should have an idea what people in this profession are all about. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, watch repairers repair, clean, and adjust mechanisms of all sorts of timing instruments, including watches and clocks.
Bleak Outlook Factor: Watch repair is a time-honored tradition, but as people rely more on devices like computers or mobile phones for the time we might see this profession shrink.
"It's become increasingly common for people to check their phones for the time," says Miranda, although he doesn't expect to see the end of watches any time soon. "People will still buy and wear watches - but more so now as jewelry. If someone is interested in working in watch repair, they'd be wise to combine that skill with jewelry making or jewelry repair," he suggests.
Time is almost up for this once-thriving profession. Only 100 new jobs in this career are projected from 2012-2022, a growth rate of 2 percent.*

Career That's Here To Stay #6Securities, Commodities and Financial Services Sales Agents

Find Programs Likelihood of Computerization: 16 percent
These are the big money men. Securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents sell securities to individuals, conduct trades, and advise companies in search of investors, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Brighter Outlook Factor: As good as computers are at some things, the financial sector of our economy still relies on people to connect buyers and sellers in financial market. "Having 15 years of financial service experience in both banking and the securities industries, I can confidentially say that financial services sales agents are here to stay," says Anthony Pili, vice-president and director of strategic planning for Greater Hudson Bank.
And while he admits that the industry has transferred some low-value tasks to computers (like opening a bank account), he underlines the importance of having a human being present to handle more complicated transactions. "The decision makers that control the large accounts will always need a relationship with someone that can always be reached, trusted and flexible."
Despite the recent financial meltdown, employment for securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents is expected to grow, with 39,700 new jobs projected, translating to growth of 11 percent from 2012 to 2022.*
Next step: Click to Find the Right Finance Program.
Preparing For This Career: If you're interested in setting out on this career path, the Department of Labor says a bachelor's degree is required for entry-level positions. Studies in business, economics, accounting, or finance are important, particularly for larger firms. The Department also notes that a master's degree in business administration (MBA) is often required for high-level securities industry positions.

5 High-Paying Jobs You Can Pursue With a High School Diploma

Source: Yahoo

Jobs You Can Pursue with a H.S. Diploma

Think you need a college degree to get your foot in the door of a job with high-pay potential? Think again.

Even though the economy has started to make an upturn, there are still plenty of people left without jobs. Are you one of the people who has tried searching for a well-paying job only to come up empty handed because you don't have a college degree?
If so, we're here to offer up some good news. It is possible to score a high-paying job, even if you've never set foot in a college classroom. It may not be easy. And it may require some prior work experience. After all, you've still got to do something to distinguish yourself from the pack. But the opportunities are out there.
Keep reading to learn more about jobs with average salaries nearing $60,000 per year (that's well over the national average) that could be pursued with just a diploma.

Career #1: Police and Sheriff's Patrol Officers

Find Degree Programs
Median
Annual Salary*
$56,130
Top 10% of
Earners*
>$90,700
Bottom 10% of Earners*
<$32,670
You know that police officers keep the peace and hand out the occasional ticket. But according to the U.S. Department of Labor, police officers and sheriff's patrol officers also do things like obtain warrants, arrest suspects, prepare cases and testify in court.
High-Pay Factors: "The lengthy rigorous training programs at the academy and in the field prepare officers for a high-risk, high-reward career that is deserving of salaries that compete with college graduates in the private sector," says retired Illinois State Police Colonel Mike Snyders.
How to Get Your Foot in the Door: You'll need that high school diploma, of course, and the department you're applying to will likely want you to complete their agency police academy program, says the Department of Labor. Police officers must be U.S. citizens, usually be at least 21 years old and meet certain physical qualifications. Candidates can be asked to take drug tests or lie detector tests, and may be disqualified if they have a felony conviction.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Police and Law Enforcement Program.
The Department reports that some police departments require some college coursework or a degree. It's also important to note that if you want to pursue any work with federal law enforcement agencies, including the FBI or the Secret Service, you'll need a bachelor's degree and/or related work experience. The Department notes that many colleges, universities, and junior colleges offer law enforcement and criminal justice programs.

Career #2: Real Estate Brokers

Find Degree Programs
Median
Annual Salary*
$59,580
Top 10% of
Earners*
>$187,050
Bottom 10% of Earners*
<$24,260
Real estate brokers assist clients in buying, selling, and renting properties. They're also responsible for comparing properties to determine a competitive market price, advising their clients on prices and mortgages, and preparing documents like purchase agreements and deeds, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
High-Pay Factors: The real estate field is ripe with opportunity, according to Jake Cain, licensed real estate agent and the creator of employedteenagers.com, a site focused on helping young people find work.
Of course, it's all about how hard you work and the value that you create for others. "You have to be a good relationship builder and willing to put in hard work to make personal connections with various types of people. If you do those things well, then you can make a significant income because you are paid on commission, not based on time," he says.
How to Get Your Foot in the Door: On top of that high school diploma, you must be licensed in all states (and the District of Columbia) to work as a real estate broker, says the Department of Labor. And while the requirements for licensing vary by state, you typically must be at least 18 years old, complete a number of real estate courses, and pass an exam. To obtain your broker's license, you'll usually need one to three years of licensed sales agent experience. You may also be required to pass a background check in some states, according to the Department.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Marketing Program.
With the increasing competitiveness and complexity of the real estate market, some employers prefer to hire candidates with a college degree or college courses, says the Department. Courses in business administration, finance, economics, and law can be useful, and brokers who plan to open their own companies often take business courses like accounting and marketing.

Career #3: Claims Adjusters, Appraisers, Examiners, Investigators

Find Degree Programs
Median
Annual Salary*
$61,190
Top 10% of
Earners*
>$90,570
Bottom 10% of Earners*
<$37,220
Claims adjusters, appraisers, examiners and investigators are the men and women responsible for evaluating insurance claims, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
High-Pay Factors: "Claims adjusters often work erratic schedules, including early mornings, late nights, and weekends, to meet the demands of their clients," says Michael Provitera, associate professor of organizational behavior at Barry University in Miami, Fla. Because they're expected to be available pretty much 24-7, employers see value in paying claims adjusters a decent wage, with or without a college degree, he says.
How to Get Your Foot in the Door: Your high school diploma is a start, but what can be really useful to have is specific knowledge in the areas where the insurer you wish to work for operates. For example, according to the Department of Labor, auto damage appraisers will typically have a postsecondary non-degree award, or have experience identifying and estimating the cost of automotive repair from working in an auto repair shop.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Program.
The Department reports that employers sometimes prefer to hire those with a bachelor's degree or some insurance-related work experience. Appropriate coursework depends on the kind of work the individual is pursuing. For example, for someone who specializes in financial loss claims due to merchandise damage, strikes, or equipment breakdowns, a background in accounting or business might be best.

Career #4: Detectives and Criminal Investigators

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Median
Annual Salary*
$76,730
Top 10% of
Earners*
>$125,320
Bottom 10% of Earners*
<$40,110
A detective, or an agent, or special agent, as they're sometimes called, is responsible for gathering facts and collecting evidence of possible crimes, notes the U.S. Department of Labor. Just like police officers, they are often called upon to testify in court.
High-Pay Factors: According to one expert, paying detectives well can actually save money. "To best utilize a forensic scientist's expertise, hiring detectives or investigators to do the searching can ease a budget-strapped department. And careers where you're developing yourself on-the-job provides ample fuel for raises, which makes them the best kind of jobs for earning a good salary," says Lyn O'Brien, a career expert and founder of YourHiddenAdvantage.com, a website dedicated to helping busy career professionals get more done.
How to Get Your Foot in the Door: Along with a high school diploma, the Department of Labor says detectives typically start their careers as police officers before being promoted to detective. Detectives and police usually must graduate from the relevant training academy and complete a period of on-the-job training. They must be at least 21, citizens of the United States, and qualify under rigorous personal and physical standards.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Criminal Justice Program.
Applicants are encouraged by state and local agencies to continue their education after graduating high school, says the Department, adding that programs in criminal justice and law enforcement are offered by many colleges, universities, and junior colleges.

Career #5: Gaming Manager

Find Degree Programs
Median
Annual Salary*
$66,200
Top 10% of
Earners*
>$117,450
Bottom 10% of Earners*
<$38,770
Gaming managers oversee the gaming operations and personnel in their part of the casino, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. They're the ones keeping an eye on customers and employees, explaining house operating rules if customers don't understand, and interviewing, hiring and training new employees.
High-Pay Factors: Provitera says gaming managers tend to be paid well because they present an ambience of fun and complimentary perks that keep people coming back to the casino time and time again.
"While a college degree can help, these professionals can often attain a high salary without a degree because a gaming manager's skill level comes from their willingness to work late hours and constantly delight the customers," he notes.
How to Get Your Foot In the Door: Besides having a high school diploma, gaming services workers must obtain licensing from a state regulatory agency, for example a gaming commission or state casino control board, says the Department of Labor. Licensing requirements for gaming dealers and other service workers will be different from those for supervisory or managerial positions. These workers must typically also pass a drug test and background check.

Degrees That Might Be A Waste Of Money


Source: Yahoo

Degrees That Might Be A Waste Of Money

If you want to make your educational investment count, don't waste your money on these dead-end degrees.

There are lots of reasons to invest in higher education. But if your primary goal is to increase your employment odds, you'll want to do your research before you decide on a major.
"What happens to a lot of [college students] is they choose a major based entirely on what they're interested in today, not giving any thought to how difficult it will be to get a job after college," says Darrell Silver, co-founder & CEO of Thinkful, an online school for adults seeking career advancement.
According to Silver, "Even just looking at income and employment rates for [careers related to] your desired major in the first five years after college can make a big difference."
Don't know where to start? Fret not. We combed through a recent report from Georgetown Center, the U.S. Department of Labor job growth statistics and reached out to career experts for their take on why certain degrees might be more worth it than others.
Keep reading to learn more.

Waste of Money Bachelor's Degree #1 Information Systems

You're great with technology and ready to take that passion to the next level by earning a degree in information systems. Before you decide on this degree, though, you may want to keep in mind the following stats...
Unemployment rate among recent graduates*: 14.7 percent
Expert insights: "The trouble with majoring in information systems is that its focus is more general and not as technical as that of a computer science or information technology degree," warns Jean Cummings, a personal branding strategist and job search coach.
And the lack of specialized technical skills leads to another problem: While most companies immediately know they need an IT person or a computer scientist, they don't necessarily know how an information systems grad might benefit their business, says Cummings.
Job outlook**: The U.S. Department of Labor does not link this specific degree to any careers.
Career Projected job growth from 2012 to 2022
- -

Bachelor's Degree That Could Pay Off #1 Finance

If you love reading the Wall Street Journal or Fortune Magazine and are looking for a degree that could open a variety of jobs, this might be a good option for you.
Unemployment rate among recent graduates*: 5.9 percent
Expert insights: "The range of jobs this degree could help you prepare to pursue range from local financial advisor to major power player on Wall Street," says Boyd.
Just keep in mind, that if you're more inclined to earn this degree to prepare to pursue a job in Wall Street, you should ensure you know what you'll be getting into. According to Boyd, the gig could be pretty stressful.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Finance Program.
Job outlook**: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, this degree could help you prepare to pursue a variety of growing careers.
Career Projected job growth from 2012 to 2022
Personal financial advisor 60,300 jobs
Securities, commodities, and financial services sales agent 39,700 jobs
Loan officer 22,900 jobs

Waste of Money Bachelor's Degree #2 Film, Video & Photography Arts

If you're a creative spirit, it may seem like a degree in film, video, or photography is a perfect fit for your fun personality. What might be less fun: setting out on your job search after graduation.
Unemployment rate among recent graduates*: 11.4 percent
Expert insights: The biggest problem with this degree is supply and demand. "There are just too many people who want to create films and videos, and take photos, and not enough people to employ them," says George A. Boyd, career counselor and life coach. "There are just not that many companies who need a dedicated media person, and the entertainment industry is deluged with applicants," he adds.
However, if your heart is really set on working in the industry, instead of majoring in this field, he recommends finding a day job and doing some projects in your free time to get started - although it's important to note that this isn't something that will always lead to a job, either.
Job outlook:** Per the U.S. Department of Labor, job opportunities in this industry don't look very promising.
Career Projected job growth from 2012 to 2022
Photographer 5,900 jobs
Film and video editor, camera operator 1,400 jobs

Bachelor's Degree That Could Pay Off #2 Elementary Education

Do you feel called to help shape a new generation of citizens as a teacher? Good news: prepping for that role could offer a strong return of investment, as we're heading into a world that needs a lot more education grads to fill teaching positions.
Unemployment rate among recent graduates*: 5.0 percent
Expert insights: This degree is the doorway to a career as a teacher, and according to Boyd, we're going to need more teachers for the foreseeable future. "With a growing population, there are many new children who need to be educated," says Boyd.
Another plus: Teaching jobs are not going anywhere. "We can't outsource this [job] - we need a live teacher in the classroom," says Boyd.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Elementary Education Program.
Job outlook**: Boyd isn't the only one projecting a need for more educators. The U.S. Department of Labor also reports that teaching jobs will also be on the rise.
Career Projected job growth from 2012 to 2022
Kindergarten teacher 20,600 jobs
Elementary school teacher 167,900 jobs
Middle school teacher 76,000 jobs

Waste of Money Bachelor's Degree #3 Political Science & Government

You're excited about politics, and that's great - but before you major in political science or government, you might want to think about the reality that recent grads of this degree are facing in the real world.
Unemployment rate among recent graduates*: 11.1 percent
Expert insights: "I won't say that you don't learn anything from a political science or government major, but you certainly don't learn practical knowledge that can be applied to a wide range of jobs," says Sarah Merrill, a recruiting and career consultant at Atrium Staffing, who herself was a political science major.
"While I enjoyed my classes on European diplomacy and public policy, when you're staring at your screen questioning ‘email etiquette' to a senior executive, or balancing a limited budget, or doing just about anything in your practical adult life, those are not the courses that are going to help."
Job outlook**: In terms of opportunity, the numbers from the U.S. Department of Labor don't look especially promising.
Career Projected job growth from 2012 to 2022
Budget analyst 3,800 jobs
Reporter, correspondent, or broadcast news analyst 7,200 jobs

Bachelor's Degree That Could Pay Off #3 Computer Science

So you're technically savvy? Computer science is a great way to go. In fact, your job prospects could look significantly brighter than your peers who graduated with information systems degrees.
Unemployment rate among recent graduates*: 8.7 percent
Expert insights: "Computer science majors are probably more in demand across every sector of the economy than anything else, so you really can't go wrong from an economic point of view," says Silver.
"Computer science is a degree that is valuable now and will continue to be, because almost all companies need technical people to create and/or manage the applications that help the business run," adds Cummings.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
Job outlook**: This tech-related degree could help you prepare to pursue a variety of in-demand careers, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Career Projected job growth from 2012 to 2022
Software developer 222,600 jobs
Network computer systems analyst 42,900 jobs
Computer programmer 28,400 jobs

Waste of Money Bachelor's Degree #4 Anthropology & Archeology

While you might love studying the subject, you might not love your job prospects after graduation. Unless you're willing to go for your graduate degree, you might find yourself lacking the skills most employers want.
Unemployment rate among recent graduates: 12.6 percent
Expert insights: The main problem with this degree is lack of job opportunities after graduation. "This is such a highly specialized field, and there are limited sources of employment," says Gina Zappariello, professional coach and certified emotional intelligence consultant.
"The main areas of employment for this major are universities (teaching and research), museums, and governments with a strong need to uncover artifacts." Unfortunately, all of those groups together can't provide enough jobs to go around.
Job outlook**: It doesn't look great for anthropology grads. For one, if you want to pursue a career in the field, you'll probably need to spend a few more years in school. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, anthropologist and archeologists need a master's degree or Ph.D.
Career Projected job growth from 2012 to 2022
- -

Bachelor's Degree That Could Pay Off #4 Business Management and Administration

Leadership, organization, people skills - if you have or want these strengths, you might want to consider a degree in business administration. Not only can earning this degree help you develop or strengthen these skills, but it could also set you on the path to pursuing a variety of different careers.
Unemployment rate among recent graduates*: 7.8 percent
Expert insights: "Business administration is great because it is so general and can be applied to a very wide array of jobs," says Merrill.
That versatility is at the heart of why this degree faces a lower unemployment rate compared to some of the other degrees on our list. But another thing to consider is that business majors might also be equipped to create their own opportunities by starting their own companies, adds Merrill.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Administration Program.
Job outlook**: With this degree you could prepare to pursue a wide range of careers - some of which are projected to create thousands of new jobs, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Career Projected job growth from 2012 to 2022
Property, real estate, and community association manager 35,000 jobs
Market research analyst 131,500 jobs
Top executive 261,500 jobs








6 Low-Paying Jobs That Will Squander Your Degree

Source: Yahoo


6 Low-Paying Jobs That Will Squander Your Degree

If you're after career growth and opportunity, you may want to reconsider these dead-end jobs that may underutilize your diploma.

Going back to school can be fun, but you better believe that you'll spend some nights burning the midnight oil studying. The fact is earning a degree takes a lot of work - not to mention time and money. So why would you want to waste your degree on a low-paying, dead-end job?
Sure, some of these jobs are labors of love that might tap into one of your passions. But if you're concerned with applying your education in a field where you can make a decent living, then you might want to steer clear of them.
To help, we've identified some alternatives that could make better use of your education by offering more room for growth and better salary potential. Keep reading to learn more.

Low-Pay Job #1:
Recreation Worker

Median Annual Salary:
$22,390*
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
>$38,890*
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
<$16,990*
Picture yourself leading fun activities for a living? If it seems too good to be true, know that it very well might be. For one: there's the higher education typically required. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, you'll need a bachelor's to pursue full-time work. Then there's the meager wages. Recreation workers have a median salary of just over $22K, reports the Department of Labor.
Why it's low-pay: The problem here with regards to pay may be that the work can be enjoyable, which drives the popularity of the career up and the pay down, says Jim Giammateo, author of the "No Mistakes Careers" self-help book series. "A recreation worker helps people to improve their lives, or make their lives more enjoyable. It's a job that people like doing. As a result, they are willing to work for less to do something they enjoy."

High-Pay Job #1:
Dental Hygienist

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Median Annual Salary:
$71,110*
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
>$96,690*
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
<$47,880*
What if we told you that you could make a healthy living by helping other people keep their teeth healthy? In fact, dental hygienists have a median salary of more than $70K for helping patients keep up their oral hygiene, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
If that salary is putting a smile on your face, then you may want to consider pursuing this career. According to the Department of Labor, dental hygienists typically only need an associate's and license to start practicing. And there's room for growth here, because as dentists expand their own offices, they'll hire more hygienists to take on and service more patients.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Dental Hygiene Program.
Why it could pay well: According to Giammatteo, pay is high for dental hygienists because they're the go-to people for dentists. "They're not only responsible for a patient's dental health, but they function as the dentist's front line of defense, often handling complaints and resolving them by themselves," he says, which drives salaries up. "Because of this, a good hygienist is in high demand."

Low-Pay Job #2: Radio/TV Announcer

Median Annual Salary:
$29,020
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
>$75,850
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
<$17,450
If you're a talker, you may think presenting news and information to listeners could be a great way to earn your dough. And it could - you just might not make very much of it. While the job often requires a bachelor's degree in journalism or a related field, per the U.S. Department of Labor, the median annual salary is a paltry $29,020.
Why it's low-pay: This job is fun and engaging, but that appeal drives salaries down, says Jeff Altman, career expert, author, and host of "Job Search Radio," a podcast dedicated to helping job hunters find employment.
Altman says that people pursuing this career face another problem: "Enormous supply, particularly of people who want to do the work and a finite number of jobs," Altman says. Giammatteo adds that the only place to really make money in announcer jobs is in large markets, and there aren't many of those to begin with, beyond the largest cities in the U.S.

High-Pay Job #2: Technical Writer

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Median Annual Salary:
$67,900
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
>$105,760
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
<$40,270
It may surprise you, but it's possible to make a good living as a writer - a technical writer, that is. This job has a median salary of $67,900 and involves writing manuals, journal articles, and other supporting documents to communicate technical information, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
If that sounds like your cup of tea, then you may want to put one of the following degrees into good use. Employers generally prefer candidates with a bachelor's degree in journalism, English, or communications, and many jobs also require knowledge in a specialized field, such as engineering, computer science, or medicine, reports the Department of Labor.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Communications Program.
Why it could pay well: The world is becoming increasingly technology-driven, which means that technical writers play an important role in many companies, says Giammatteo. "Non-technical people are being required to learn new things every day," he says. "Some people adapt easily, while others struggle. Companies know that the easier they make it for people to learn their systems, the better a customer they'll have, [which] is where the technical writer comes in."
"It requires a special talent to translate technology into terms the everyday person can understand," Giammatteo continues. "Just try writing an explanation for how to tie a shoelace. Then imagine how difficult that is for learning to run a complex electronic device."

Low-Pay Job #3:
Film Editor

Median Annual Salary:
$54,490
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
>$128,500
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
<$25,960
You've loved movies for as long as you can remember, and perhaps you dream of making your own someday. If that's the case, you'd usually need to earn a bachelor's degree, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Unfortunately, studying film and finding a job in the film industry are two different things. While film editors have a decent salary, the Department of Labor says that this job is expected to only grow by a mere 1 percent from 2012 to 2022. So be prepared to face stiff competition in spite of your talent and educational background.
Why it's low-pay: "Film editor jobs fall into the 'I want to do that' trap," says Giammatteo. "Making videos is a hobby for many people, and therefore, attractive as a career. Who doesn't want to work at a job doing what they love?"
Unfortunately, that appeal, in conjunction with the unlikely outcome of making it big, keeps salaries low, he explains.

High-Pay Job #3: Market Research Analyst

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Median Annual Salary:
$60,800
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
>$114,250
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
<$33,490
If you're interested in the data behind shopping and business, you may want to use your natural curiosity to pursue a job as a market research analyst. Turns out these marketing professionals have a median salary of $60,800 in this role, which involves crunching data to help businesses and companies understand where, when, and how to market their goods and services, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
So instead of squandering your education, you may want to use your schooling to prep for this field. According to the Department of Labor, you'll need a bachelor's degree in market research or a related field for most positions. Many analysts have degrees in areas such as statistics, math, and computer science, while others have backgrounds in business administration, communications, or the social sciences.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Administration Program.
Why it could pay well: According to Giammatteo, the internet has created an increased demand for market research analysts, and that demand has pushed the salaries of market research analysts up.
"The internet has created a new world in more ways than one, but one of the biggest changes is in how people shop," he says. "Market research analysts help companies understand their customers' needs, which allows companies to develop strategies on how to market their products. The good ones are in very high demand."
The bottom line is businesses need these type of people to understand what sells and what people want from the products and services they pay for, says Giammatteo, so they can make themselves more desirable to customers.

Low-Pay Job #4:
Social Worker

Median Annual Salary:
$42,120
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
>$72,350
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
<$27,420
If helping others is in your DNA, a career in social work may sound like it'd be a good fit for you. But just be sure that you're okay with earning your degree to make below-average pay. Because social workers have a median annual salary of just $42,120, and most entry-level positions commonly require a bachelor's in social work, notes the U.S. Department of Labor. For certain positions, you might even need a master's, adds the Department of Labor, and while that could improve your pay, the numbers show you're never going to make major bank in this field.
Why it's low-pay: Social work is just one of those fields where even though the work can be emotionally tough and draining, the pay has never really reflected that, says Giammatteo.
"It seems as if social workers have thankless jobs - low pay, combined with a constant barrage of problems," says Giammatteo, from the stressful nature of their work to the lack of resources. "The appeal for the people who are drawn to this field has to be the ability to make a difference in someone's life. And that reward is often worth the sacrifices they make."

High-Pay Job #4: Human Resources Manager

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Median Annual Salary:
$100,800
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
>$177,460
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
<$58,780
You're a people-person with the ability to talk to anyone, so maybe you should consider a career as a human resources manager. You'd spend your days mediating disputes, staffing jobs, and advising managers, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Plus, human resources managers have a median salary of about $100,800.
Not bad for a job that usually only requires a bachelor's degree. According to the Department of Labor, you typically need a bachelor's in human resources or business administration. However, several years of work experience will be needed to pursue higher-level jobs, so be ready to work for a bit less before your big pay day comes. Either way, your diploma might be well spent on this career.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Human Resources Program.
Why it could pay well: According to Giammatteo, human resources managers have become increasingly important to workforce productivity, and thus salaries have risen accordingly to reflect their importance to businesses.
"Companies now realize that their most valuable asset is their people," says Giammatteo. "And the human resources manager is in charge of not only recruiting those people, but ensuring the company keeps them challenged and happy."

Low-Pay Job #5:
Coach and Scout

Median Annual Salary:
$29,150
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
>$66,839
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
<$17,340
Can you see yourself putting together and leading an all-star winning team to glory? It'll take more than bravado and imagination to pursue a career as a coach and scout, as the U. S Department of Labor says you'll typically need a bachelor's and deep knowledge of a particular sport. But you may be shocked to find that coaches and scouts have a median annual salary of only $29,150, according to the Department of Labor. Talk about a sad stat.
Why it's low-pay: The salary in this job is low, because the most attainable positions at the local level are part-time and thus don't pay what a full-time position would, says Altman. But those factors don't necessarily deter everyone.
"These jobs are almost exclusively filled by people who love what they do, and most of them are willing to do it for less," Giammatteo explains. So if your love of the game outweighs your desire for higher pay, then "play ball."

High-Pay Job #5: Software Developer (Applications)

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Median Annual Salary:
$92,660
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
>$143,540
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
<$55,770
Has there ever been a better time to be a computer nerd? Programming video games and writing software has become a lucrative field. So if you're interested in tech, consider pursuing a job as an applications software developer, in which you'd design computer applications, from databases to word processors, for consumers, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Another reason to consider this job is its major earning power - applications developers have a median salary of $92,660, reports the Department of Labor. With a salary like that, the time and effort you spend on your education could be well worth it. Developers typically have a bachelor's in computer science along with strong computer programming skills, says the Department.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
Why it could pay well: According to Altman, right now, there are few candidates that have the right combo of tech savvy, problem-solving skills, and creative thinking needed for this career. Software development has a "low supply to enormous demand in a market that is extremely segmented," he says, and employers are willing to pay for those very niche skills and that specialized knowledge.

Low-Pay Job #6:
Craft and Fine Artist

Median Annual Salary:
$42,610
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
>$91,200
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
<$18,450
You've always been creative and loved making things. But chances are, you're probably not going to become the next Picasso or Andy Warhol after art school. A lot of artists earn bachelor's degrees in their respective fields, as the U.S. Department of Labor notes, but even with a college diploma in hand, this is a pretty low-paying gig for most.  Craft and fine artists have a median salary of just $42,610 - so it might be best to leave the crafting and art making as a hobby.
Why it's low-pay: The low pay in the arts can be attributed to poor self-marketing, says Debra Benton, recruiting expert and author of The CEO Difference. Giammatteo adds that it's also because there's simply so much competition, and the chances of making it big are slim.
While artists have a passion for what they do, "[they] seem to have a love-hate relationship with their jobs," says Giammatteo. He explains that artists pursue their careers, because they have a strong desire to do so, whether or not it pays.

High-Pay Job #6:
Art Director

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Median Annual Salary:
$83,000
Top 10 Percent of Earners:
>$169,450
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners:
<$44,500
Art and design is everywhere - on the streets, in your home, and on the internet - so being a starving artist isn't your only option. Your best bet in a creative field might be a career as an art director. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, these are the go-to folks for designing visual materials for everything from magazines to television productions.
So don't let your art degree go to waste. Instead, you could pursue this career, which requires at least a bachelor's in an art or design-related field along with previous work experience. The time spent earning your degree could pay off, since the Department of Labor reports that art directors have a median salary of $83,000.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Graphic Design Program.
Why it could pay well: According to Giammatteo, the art director's role at a company has expanded in recent years, and working in the emerging areas of digital and social media has upped salaries. Branding is everything to businesses today, so companies are willing to shell out more dough for these professionals, he explains.
"With so many companies looking to 're-brand' themselves and make a digital impact, the job of art director has taken on new roles," he says. "They can no longer be concerned only with print; they must now understand the Internet, the new frontiers of digital publishing, and the impact social media can have on a company's brand."

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