Six degrees that fit your busy schedule


Flexible Online Degrees

Want to still have time for your job, your friends, and your family when you go back to school? Online education might be the right choice.

By Terence Loose
Are you ready to go back to school to earn your degree but not quite sure how you can "go back" to those days when you had no work or family obligations? Back then, commuting to class, finding parking, then walking across campus to a classroom merely meant a little less time hanging with friends or watching TV.
Now, you have a "real life," and every second counts. That's why online education might be the answer.
"These days, people have very demanding schedules with work, family, and other obligations. For these people, online education is perfect," says Norma Kent, strategic communications consultant and former senior vice president of communications of American Community Colleges.
Colleges are making a concerted effort to have schools fit the students' schedules, not the other way around, Kent explains. Online education gives students from all walks of life the opportunity to earn their degree on their own time, whether that's after the kids have been tucked in or between two part-time jobs.
So we checked out six degrees that are fit for online learning and let you know where these flexible degrees could lead you professionally.

Online Degree #1: Accounting

If you've crunched the numbers and going back to school for a degree in accounting adds up career-wise but may not work with your busy life, maybe you should factor an online accounting degree into the equation. It's a perfect fit for this medium, says David Bakke, editor at Money Crashers, a website devoted to career and finance advice.
Bakke says the accounting major is well-suited for online learning because it matches the kind of work you'll do following graduation: number-crunching on a computer and meeting deadlines without close supervision.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Accounting Program.
What You'll Learn: If you choose accounting as a major, you'll do more than just crunch numbers, says the College Board, a nonprofit research organization that promotes higher education. You'll learn how to gather, assess, and interpret information about individuals' and organizations' financial risks. In addition to accounting classes, the College Board says you could take business law, auditing, and cost accounting.
Potential Career: Accountant. The Department of Labor says that accountants prepare and examine financial records, study financial operations, and help ensure that organizations run efficiently.*
Potential Median Annual Salary: $63,550. The top 10 percent of accountants earn $111,510, while the bottom 10 percent come in at $39,930.**

Online Degree #2: Elementary Education

You might think that pursuing a degree in elementary education would require a lot of time in the classroom. But this is not always the case, says Bakke.
"If you're pressed for time, or even working a full-time job while pursuing your degree, then getting a degree online in elementary education makes sense because there's generally not as much [in-classroom training] required," says Bakke.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Education Program.
What You'll Learn: As an education major, you might study everything from educational psychology to school health issues, says the College Board. You could take courses such as education in a multicultural society, education of the exceptional child, instructional technology, and teaching methods.
Potential Career: Elementary School Teacher. A significant number of teachers retiring from 2010 to 2020 is just one reason the U.S. Department of Labor expects many job opportunities for new teachers. If you choose this path, you'd help our next generation get a solid foundation for their scholastic life by teaching them basic subjects, such as math and reading, says the Department of Labor.*
Potential Median Annual Salary: $53,400. The top 10 percent of elementary school teachers earn an annual median wage of $83,160, while the bottom 10 percent come in at $35,630.**

Online Degree #3: Business Administration and Management

If you think going back to school for a business degree would be great for your career, but you can't afford to pause your career to do it, an online degree program might be a practical solution.
"A business administration degree is the perfect complement to an individual already working in that industry, but without that specific education," says Bakke. He adds that the business degree lends itself to online study because there is very little, if any, instruction that has to be "hands-on," as there often is in, say, the sciences, where lab or field experience is a must.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Business Administration Program.
What You'll Learn: Are you ready to learn what it takes to plan, organize, control, and direct an organization? The College Board says that's what a business administration and management program could teach you. You'll take courses in a range of subjects, such as business ethics and law, human resources management, economics, and marketing.
Potential Career: Budget Analyst. Budgets might not sound super-sexy, but in business they're crucial. Budget analysts organize the finances of public and private institutions by tracking their budgets and spending, says the U.S. Department of Labor.*
Potential Median Annual Salary: $69,280. The top 10 percent of budget analysts earn an annual median wage of $103,590, while the bottom 10 percent come in at $45,720.**

Online Degree #4: Paralegal Studies

Fascinated with the law but don't have the time to put all your obligations on hold while you pursue a law degree? An online program in paralegal studies could be your ticket to a new career in law, attained while you keep your current job.
"One of the larger responsibilities of being a paralegal is research, often online, and you certainly get your feet wet in that area by pursuing a paralegal degree online," says Bakke. He says that, in fact, much of what paralegal students study is how to access legal information and research online. How perfect is that?
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Paralegal Studies Program.
What You'll Learn: The College Board says that in addition to research, you'll learn about legal writing and prepare to assist attorneys. Courses for paralegal studies majors range quite a bit, from litigation and civil procedure to ethics and criminal law and procedure, says the College Board.
Potential Career: Paralegal. Paralegals support lawyers by investigating cases, researching applicable case laws, and even drafting legal documents, says the U.S. Department of Labor.*
Potential Median Annual Salary: $46,990. The top 10 percent of paralegals earn an annual median wage of $75,410, while the bottom 10 percent come in at $29,420.**

Online Degree #5: Graphic Design

If you've got a lot of artist and a little bit of computer geek in you, a bachelor's in graphic design might be a great major for your two sides to make friends. And pursuing your degree online could make a lot of sense, as Bakke says the major is a perfect fit for online study.
"Graphic designers often must work independently, which is exactly what you do when choosing to get your degree via the Internet," says Bakke. He says another benefit is that the computer programs you'll gain skills in will be on your own computer, so you can practice anytime.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Graphic Design Program.
What You'll Learn: In a graphic design program, you could learn the design and computer skills to create everything from book covers to websites, according to the College Board. Graphic design majors take classes like Photoshop for designers, typography, and graphic design studio.
Potential Career: Graphic Designer. These professionals combine art and technology to create designs that will communicate ideas, says the U.S. Department of Labor. They help brands stand out and build recognition - just think about Apple or your favorite blockbuster movie poster.*
Potential Median Annual Salary: $44,150. The top 10 percent of graphic designers earn an annual median wage of $77,490, while the bottom 10 percent come in at $26,250.**

Online Degree #6: IT and Information Systems

Pursuing this degree the old-fashioned way, you'd probably spend a lot of time on computers - but first you'd have to drive away from your own computer at home to get to a college campus. Bakke says that now, there may be a better way.
"IT and information systems degrees are absolutely more suited for online coursework, because that is exactly where you will be working once you graduate - on computers," says Bakke. Also, he says, because of the subject matter, you can bet your instructors will not be hampered by the technology.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online IT and Information Systems Program.
What You'll Learn: If you sign up for an IT degree, you'll study how computing systems support business, research, and communications needs as well as the complex relationship we have with computers, says the College Board. Typical courses may include computer networking, C++ programming, and ethical, legal, and social issues in information technology.
Potential Career: Network and Computer Systems Administrator. These are the people who keep an organization's crucial computer systems running on a day-to-day basis, and computer networks are a critical part of any business, says the U.S. Department of Labor. So you can bet that these people make an impact.*
Potential Median Annual Salary: $72,560. The top 10 percent of network and computer systems administrators earn an annual median wage of $115,180, while the bottom 10 percent come in at $44,330.**

Careers for people who hate routine


Jobs That Aren't Routine

These jobs require adaptability, flexibility, and the ability to think and react quickly.

By Terri Williams
While some people like predictability and certainty, others prefer a life less ordinary. They hate work that is so monotonous it could be performed while blindfolded with one hand tied behind the back.
If you count yourself in this crowd, you might be the kind of adventurous soul who needs new challenges every day and who finds the thrill of the unexpected is what wakes you up in the morning. You probably adapt quickly to changing environments and actually thrive in chaos and ambiguity. So how do you find yourself a job?
According to Clarissa Kenty, a career expert in Birmingham, AL, "People who hate routine jobs need a variety of duties as well as the opportunity to formulate creative solutions to problems."
Many of these individuals work in emergency roles, which is a good thing because, let's face it, there's nothing routine about a life-and-death situation, and people who can think quickly can save countless lives.
However, quick thinkers are also needed in other roles where job duties can change in the blink of an eye. Keep reading to learn about seven good career choices for people who hate routine.

Career #1: Police Officer

There's no such thing as a routine day for police officers. Even a "routine" traffic stop can quickly morph into a high-speed chase or a dangerous shootout. That's why it's great for those who love unpredictability.
Why It's Unpredictable: "Each day, police officers are presented with different challenges. There are different crimes, different levels of crimes, and different perpetrators," says Kenty. "In the course of a single day, they may respond to a domestic dispute, a robbery in progress, a hostage situation, or they may provide testimony in a court case." However, keep in mind that according to the U.S. Department of Labor, police officers may also have less exciting responsibilities such as writing reports and filling out forms.
And police work also offers a variety of career choices, as according to the Department of Labor, there are different types of police officers, including state troopers, transit and railroad police, and fish and game wardens. Opportunities at the federal level might include working for the FBI, U.S. Border Patrol, and the U.S. Secret Service.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Criminal Justice Program.
Educational Options: Usually candidates must have a high school diploma or GED, says the Department. However, many agencies require college coursework or a college degree. In addition, applicants must graduate from their agency's training academy, be U.S. citizens at least 21 years of age, and pass physical and personal qualifying tests.

Career #2: Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners

Coordinating every aspect of a major meeting, convention, or event allows planners to go from manager to negotiator, from organizer to problem-solver - and frequently shifting gears keeps the job exciting.
Why It's Unpredictable: "Each client has a different style, different needs, and a different budget amount," explains Kenty. "And based on these factors, it may be a small, medium, or large event. It may be held indoors or outdoors and may be a strictly formal or a casual event."
Kelly Peacy, senior vice president of education and meetings for the Professional Convention Management Association agrees the work is never routine because of the various types of events they produce. "We may organize black tie events and fundraising galas, manage exhibit halls or trade shows, plan educational sessions, and handle off-site excursions, she says.
"And the variety of duties we perform include food and beverage arrangements, event site selection, audio visual arrangements, hotel and venue contracting, budget and financial management, speaker and entertainment management, decorating and design, and also transportation management."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Program.
Education Options: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, many employers prefer those with related work experience in hotels or planning and a bachelor's degree. Event planners come from a variety of different backgrounds. Related bachelor's degrees might include hospitality management, marketing, business, communications, and public relations.

Career #3: Firefighters

Most people think firefighters spend all day, well, fighting fires. However, they do much more than this. And even the firefighting aspect is unpredictable.
Why It's Unpredictable: "Firefighters may respond to a house fire, a car fire, or a commercial building fire, and it may be a small fire or a three-alarm blaze," says Kenty. "Each situation presents different challenges based on the type and level of fire."
And according to Battalion Chief Raymond Williams of the Birmingham Fire Department in Birmingham, AL, firefighters actually respond to more medical emergencies than fires. "We handle all types of life-threatening medical situations such as strokes, heart attacks, and injuries resulting from car wrecks, violence, or accidents in the home," he says.
Williams says that firefighters also respond to hazardous spills, floods, forest fires, and explosions. In addition, he says they educate the public on fire safety by "conducting fire drills and teaching classes on how to use fire extinguishers."
Education Options: While in many jurisdictions the entry-level education requirement is a high school diploma, the U.S. Department of Labor says that most firefighters enter the job with postsecondary education, usually a postsecondary non-degree award in fire science or a related subject. The Department of Labor notes that associate's degree programs are available as well.

Career #4: Emergency Room Nurses

The phrase "emergency room" is a not-so-subtle hint that this is an ideal job for those who like the excitement of handling random medical emergencies.
Why It's Unpredictable: "Different patients will present different medical challenges, and there may be fast periods and slow periods. So emergency room nurses constantly multitask, and they quickly shift gears," says Kenty.
JoAnn Lazarus, president of the Emergency Nurses Association board of directors, echoes Kenty's sentiment. "In one day, you may help a mother birth a child into the world, and also hold the hand of someone in the last stages of their life," says Lazarus. "One minute you're taking care of a child who placed a foreign object in his nose, and a few minutes later, you're treating someone who had a heart attack."
And Lazarus says that there are a variety of settings in which emergency nurses may work. "Besides the emergency room department, emergency nurses may be flight nurses, a part of the transport unit in an ambulance, or they may work in an urgent care center.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Nursing Program.
Education Options: There are three paths to a career as a registered nurse, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Students can obtain a bachelor's or associate's degree in nursing or a diploma from an approved nursing program. They must also be licensed.

Career#5: Public Relations Specialists/Managers

As Warren Buffet once said, "It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it." And the delicate balance act required to manage a company's reputation is anything but routine.
Why It's Unpredictable: "Not only do these professionals handle communication with an organization's clients, but they also craft the information that is shared with investors and the public," says Kenty.
Sonya Grigoruk, director of public relations at Paramount Farms in Los Angeles, confirms that this career is never routine. "Public relations specialists and managers are involved with everything from developing PR campaigns and handling media training for executives to staffing media events, writing press releases, and pitching possible stories to the media," she says.
Grigoruk says job responsibilities may vary by organization, but says, "In my career, I've done everything from holding ribbon cutting ceremonies at solar farm openings and conducting pistachio harvest media tours to managing PR agencies around the world, including China, India, and South America."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Communications Program.
Education Options: Public relations specialists typically need a bachelor's degree. Employers usually want a candidate who has studied public relations, journalism, business, English, or communications, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Career #6: Police, Fire, and Ambulance Dispatchers

These dispatchers serve as the link that connects people in distressing and urgent situations with the help they need, which is never boring or mundane.
Why It's Unpredictable: "Each call is different and many of the callers are frantic," says Kenty. "Emergency dispatchers decipher what the caller is saying, while trying to calm them down."
And according to Jamie Zeller, president of the California Emergency Dispatcher Association, dispatchers work at various times of the day, "from the day shift to the graveyard shift." The calls can vary widely, too. "We take calls for immediate emergency assistance, as well as calls from people who need advice in non-emergency-type situations."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Educational Program.
Education Options: The U.S. Department of Labor reports that most dispatchers have a high school diploma, although there may be additional requirements that vary by state. The Department of Labor adds that some employers may prefer to hire those who have an associate's or bachelor's degree in a related subject, such as criminal justice, communications, or computer science. Many states require dispatchers to obtain certification.

Career #7: Medical and Health Services Managers

If there's an element of routine in the day-to-day duties of medical and health service managers, it's that they routinely wear more than one hat.
Why It's Unpredictable: "These managers are dealing with patients, staff, doctors, and vendors, and all of these relations must be handled differently," says Kenty.
For example, "We hire and fire staff, keep up with human resource laws, and are responsible for accounts payable and accounts receivable," says Pam Lewis, a certified medical manager and chair of the Professional Association of Health Care Office Management.
Dorothy Thompson, a certified medical manager and the practice administrator at Carolina Medical Consultants in Rock Hill, SC, agrees that the job is far from routine. "You're also the liaison between the staff and the physicians and also between the patients and the staff," she says. "Sometimes, you're also a disciplinarian, and at times, a comforter." Thompson says she's never bored and is constantly learning new things.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Health Care Administration Program.
Education Options: "Prospective medical and health services managers have a bachelor's degree in health administration," says the U.S. Department of Labor. Master's degrees are also common, according to the Department of Labor, in fields such as health services, public administration, long-term care administration, public health, and business administration.

High-earning jobs to help pay off student loans faster


High-Pay Careers To Help With Loans

If you're worried about the cost of college and being able to pay back your student loans, you might want to think about preparing for one of these high-earning jobs.

By Andrea Duchon
Are you thinking about going back to school but are concerned with the amount of debt you could rack up while earning your degree? Well, you might have reason to worry.
Roughly two-thirds of college seniors who graduated in 2011 had student loan debt, according to the study "Student Debt and the Class of 2011" by the Institute for College Access & Success, a nonprofit organization working to make higher education more accessible and affordable.
How much did they owe? A whopping $26,600 was the average loan amount, the study says. That means that if you're considering heading to school anytime soon, you may do well to starting envisioning a career path that could pay well - so you could pay your student loans back faster.
Below we break down six high-paying careers that pay a median annual wage that's more than the national average, which in August 2013 was $43,145 for employees on private payrolls, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Some of these careers even report earnings of double that amount. Talk about real loan-paying power!

Career #1: Public Relations Specialist

Median Annual Income: $54,170*
Highest 10 Percent of Earners: $101,030*
Lowest 10 Percent of Earners: $30,760*
Maybe your friends have told you that you're a pro at communicating, or you enjoy making sure everyone's point of view is represented. A career as a public relations specialist could put your solid communication skills to use for you in the form of an equally solid paycheck.
The U.S. Department of Labor says that PR specialists create and maintain their client's public image by writing press releases, responding to requests for information, and generally helping their clients communicate effectively to the public.
Loan-Paying Power: "Every organization cares about their public image, and it's critical to maintain that throughout the years," says Scott Willyerd, president at Dick Jones Communications, a PR company that represents higher education establishments.
"A good PR specialist will know how to talk to the media, make sure their client is portrayed in the best light, and be able to deal with crisis if and when it happens," Willyerd says. "That's why employers are willing to pay for someone who knows what they're doing and has the experience of a solid degree behind them."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Communications Program.
Education Options: Typically, these professionals need a bachelor's degree. Employers usually want applicants who have studied English, public relations, journalism, communications, or business, according to the Department of Labor.

Career #2: Personal Financial Advisor

Median Annual Income: $67,520
Highest 10 Percent of Earners: $187,199+
Lowest 10 Percent of Earners: $32,280
You're a pro at numbers and your friends may look to you when they need to balance their checkbook or find out what's going on in the stock market. Pursuing a career as a personal financial advisor could put you in the driver's seat to a high-paying career that could also get your own loan finances in tip-top shape.
In the most basic sense, personal financial advisors give financial advice to people. The U.S. Department of Labor says they do that by meeting with clients to discuss their financial goals, recommending investments, monitoring client accounts, and researching investment opportunities.
Loan-Paying Power: A career as a personal financial advisor can be very lucrative once you have the right pieces in place, says Rick Scott, assistant professor of finance at Saint Leo University. And that first piece is honing your sales skills, since all good personal financial advisors must start as salespeople first in order to identify clients and start making the big bucks.
Maclyn Clouse, professor of finance at the University of Denver's Daniels College of Business, elaborates further and says the real loan-paying power comes in when you've spent time and creative effort building your book of business.
"That's when this person will lose the salary and be paid solely on commission, thus the phrase "you eat what you kill," she adds. "The level of the income - and thus how quickly you can pay back your loans - will depend on the success of building the book of clients."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Finance Program.
Education Options: According to the Department of Labor, you'll typically need a bachelor's degree to pursue this career, with majors like finance, economics, accounting, business, math, or law being good preparation. The Department notes that certification in the field could also improve your chances for advancement.

Career #3: Graphic Designer

Median Annual Income: $44,150
Highest 10 Percent of Earners: $77,490
Lowest 10 Percent of Earners: $26,250
Are you constantly poking around the web, critiquing web layouts, and getting inspired by good design? You may want to take a look at graphic design, a career that could allow you to flex your creative side while simultaneously expanding your bank account balance.
Graphic designers work with visuals, creating images and concepts that inspire, inform, and captivate consumers, notes the U.S. Department of Labor. To do that, they're responsible for determining strategies to reach a particular demographic, creating images and designs, and presenting their designs to clients and art directors.
Loan-Paying Power: Russ Hovendick, founder of Directional Motivation, a free online resource for career advancement, says graphic designers help in raising the perceived level of professionalism of an organization - whether it be in marketing materials, newsletters, promotions, logos, or online presence. Because all of this concerns an organization's public image, they're ready to shell out the big bucks to make it look good.
Hovendick adds that he's seen graphic designers at his own firm close to double their salary, because their skills can also be used on the side for other clients in the form of freelance work.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Graphic Design Program.
Education Options: The Department of Labor reports that a bachelor's degree in graphic design or a related field is usually a requirement. However, they also note that candidates "may pursue technical training" to meet requirements if they hold a bachelor's degree in a different field.

Career #4: Software Developer

Median Annual Income: $99,000
Highest 10 Percent of Earners: $148,850
Lowest 10 Percent of Earners: $62,800
Have you always been fascinated by how your computer runs, and more importantly, what's running it? A career as a software developer not only helps you to understand everything happening behind the scenes, it allows you the chance to create it - all while earning a great wage that could go toward your student loan debt.
These are the ladies and gents that are the creative brains behind computer programs, as reported by the U.S. Department of Labor. Among their many tasks, you might find them analyzing users' needs and developing software, designing applications and systems, and collaborating with other computer specialists to create the best software possible.
Loan-Paying Power: Because graduates in software development don't need to attend graduate school in order to gain access to high-salary positions, they're generally employed earlier and have less debt to begin with, says Ken Yarnall, professor of math and computer science at Lebanon Valley College in Annville, PA.
Additionally, he says there's a simple supply and demand problem that also drives up the salaries for qualified grads. "We aren't graduating enough computer science students to fill current need. For the foreseeable future, the job market will place a tremendous premium on software developing graduates."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
Education Options: Usually, software developers have a bachelor's degree in a field like computer science, software engineering, or a related field, according to the Department of Labor. They also report that a degree in math is acceptable.

Career #5: Market Research Analyst

Median Annual Income: $60,300
Highest 10 Percent of Earners: $113,500
Lowest 10 Percent of Earners: $33,280
Shop 'til you drop! If that's your personal motto, you may be interested in learning about the ins-and-outs of a career as a market research analyst. And since this career pays well, you could be student debt-free quickly.
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, market research analysts examine the potential sales of a product or service. They're the ones monitoring and forecasting marketing and sales trends, gathering data about consumers, and preparing reports for clients and management teams, the Department of Labor says.
Loan-Paying Power: "[M]arketing research is essential to a company's bottom line, which is pretty much all that matters at the end of the day," says David Polk, professor of behavioral science at York College of Pennsylvania. "Hiring someone who's able to crunch numbers and turn them into usable data about the consumer is invaluable and companies recognize that, and in turn, reward the work with a great paycheck."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Administration Program.
Education Options: You'll need strong math and analytical skills in addition to a bachelor's degree in marketing research or a related field, says the Department. However, many market research analysts have degrees in math, computer science, or statistics, while others have backgrounds in business administration, one of the social sciences, or communications.

Career #6: Accountant

Median Annual Income: $63,550
Highest 10 Percent of Earners: $111,510
Lowest 10 Percent of Earners: $39,930
If number-crunching your potential student debt has left you skilled with calculations, consider putting that analytical brain to use in this career. A job as an accountant gives you the opportunity to earn a pretty penny by keeping an eye on an organization's cash flow.
Accountants work to ensure that financial records are accurate. The U.S. Department of Labor says that they examine financial statements for organizations and compute taxes, in addition to organizing and maintaining financial records.
Loan-Paying Power: The paying power here comes from the fact that a valued accountant can really take an organization to the next level financially, says Scott Berlin, tax accountant at Forest City Enterprises, Inc. in Cleveland, Ohio.
"Every organization needs an accountant, but it's not enough to just have an interest in numbers," he adds. "Instead, organizations are constantly on the hunt for qualified accounting grads, because those are the people that will be able to spot financial errors and save the company money in the long-run. Good people are worth holding onto and worth paying well."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Accounting Program.
Education Options: You'll need at least a bachelor's degree in accounting or a related field to pursue a career as an accountant, according to the Department of Labor. Some employers may prefer those who have master's degrees in either accounting or in business administration with a concentration in accounting.

Seven Big Money Jobs, No Advanced Degree Required


High-Pay Jobs Without Grad School

No advanced degree - no problem. Snagging a lucrative job without going to grad school isn't just a dream.

By Danielle Blundell
Worried that without a graduate degree in your hands, your career is going nowhere fast? Think again. Spending years in school isn't the only ticket to a high-paying job.
"Yes, you absolutely can work your way up in a job or company without an advanced degree," says Daniel Newell, job development and marketing specialist at the San Jose State University career center. "Having a master's may help in certain fields, but the job market hasn't gotten to the point where a master's is the only route to a high-paying job. "
Wondering which jobs pay relatively well and require just a plain old bachelor's degree? Keep reading for more.

Career #1: Accountant

Median Annual Salary: $63,550*
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $111,510
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $39,930
If numbers are your forte, and you'd rather enter the working world without tacking on a couple of extra years for grad school, then pursuing a career as an accountant could be a great professional move.
Life on the Job: As an accountant, you could be responsible for organizing financial records and analyzing the profits and losses of a company to suggest ways for improvement, says the U.S. Department of Labor. You might also handle a company's tax-paying activities.
Why It Pays: According to Newell, accounting jobs pay well from the get-go because of the highly covetable, complex skill set graduates come out of school with - namely, that they've got good math sense and the ability to communicate findings to higher-ups. "Accounting is the foundation of any business," says Newell. "Companies really need proficient people in this role so they don't go bankrupt or lose lots of money."
For Stuart Mease, director of undergraduate career services at the Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, high pay is directly related to the fact that accountants' services are always in need. Accountants have "skills that are directly billable for tax and audit work needed done by firms for its clients," he says. And from Mease's experience, every year there's a steady stream of new graduates with bachelor's degrees that get hired at firms around the country.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Accounting Program.
Education Requirements: While an advanced degree isn't required for most accountant positions, the Department of Labor says a bachelor's in accounting or a related field is. The Department does note that some employers might prefer those with a master's degree in accounting, or in business administration with a specialization in accounting.

Career #2: Registered Nurse

Median Annual Salary: $65,470*
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $45,040
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $94,720.
Want the opportunity to help people and be compensated handsomely for your services, all without going to grad school? If that sounds like music to your ears, consider pursuing a career as a registered nurse.
Life on the Job: Think of an RN as a doctor's right hand. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, responsibilities could include administering medications, helping perform diagnostic tests, and taking the vitals of patients.
Why It Pays: "RNs are paid well because there's a lot of training involved and a baseline of medical terminology and biology that you must master to provide care, even when you're not getting a Ph.D. in nursing" says Newell. "Also, it's a very critical profession - you see people at their worst, and one mistake could mean life or death for a patient."
Newell also thinks that the current shortage of nurses, in combination with the increasing aging population, also contributes to the competitive salaries.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Nursing Program.
Education Requirements: Turns out there are three potential approaches to this job: an associate's degree in nursing, a diploma from an approved nursing program, or a bachelor's of science in nursing, according to the Department of Labor. Either way - no need for years in grad school. But the Department says you will have to pass a state licensing exam to qualify for providing care to the ill and injured in any state.

Career #3: Computer Hardware Engineer

Median Annual Salary: $100,920*
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $150,130
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $63,970
We're all plugged in these days - iPads, smartphones, laptops - so somebody's got to make the gadgets and programs that we can't live without. That's precisely what computer hardware engineers do, and it doesn't take an advanced degree to prepare to pursue the job. Even better, the starting salaries can be very competitive right off the bat.
Life on the Job: As a computer hardware engineer, you might design new computer hardware and equipment, oversee its creation, and then test it for user experience, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
Why It Pays: When asked what field he thinks is the next money-maker of the future without a graduate degree, Mease answered computer engineering. "Computer engineering is the new manufacturing of our lifetime," says Mease. "The U.S. is not producing enough domestic students to fill the demand," which in turn can drive salaries up. High demand, high pay, and low on required education - pretty much a dream if you're down on grad school.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Engineering Program.
Education Requirements: Earning a bachelor's degree from an accredited school is the best way to pursue a career as a computer hardware engineer, says the Department of Labor. Most of these professionals study computer engineering, although a degree in electrical engineering is usually accepted too. And while a grad degree isn't required for most computer hardware engineering positions, according to the Department, some specialized positions or large firms require it.

Career #4: Financial Analyst

Median Annual Salary: $76,950*
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $148,430
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $47,130
Guilty of giving your friends financial advice even when they don't ask for it? Don't apologize - just put your money savvy to work by pursuing a career as a personal financial advisor. You could make big bucks without ever stepping foot in grad school.
Life on the Job: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, financial analysts give advice to clients and companies on investment opportunities, ranging from stocks to bonds and other types of investments. You might also study business trends and evaluate current and historical data.
Why It Pays: According to Newell, financial analysts rake in the dough because the field requires them to be detail-oriented and able to make critical recommendations to either clients or supervisors. "These are the people who are telling companies where their dollars are coming from and how to spend them," says Newell. He adds that such traits that are often innate and subsequently honed with no more than a bachelor's degree.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Finance Program.
Education Requirements: Many financial analyst positions require a bachelor's degree in a discipline such as accounting, business administration, economics, finance, or statistics, according to the Department of Labor. Some advanced positions, however, do require a master's degree. The Department says employers often require such a degree in business administration or finance.

Career #5: Applications Software Developer

Median Annual Salary: $90,060*
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $138,880
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $55,190
Love living the solitary life, sitting at your computer and plugging away all day? Then pursuing the path of a software developer could be the right fit for you. Even better, you won't need a graduate degree, just fluency in a computer language or two.
Life on the Job: As an applications software developer, you'll be the creative brains behind the latest apps for computers and mobile devices. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, you might also test these apps and ensure that they function normally.
Why It Pays: Again, Newell says in this industry pay can be high for candidates without advanced degrees because the need for software developers outweighs the supply. "Technology has taken off, and there are new ventures every day," he says. "[Computer] languages become obsolete so fast that companies really are willing to pay for the best idea and the most talented individuals, which drives salaries up."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
Education Requirements: Per the U.S. Department of Labor, developers typically hold a bachelor's in computer science or another related field, like software engineering. A degree in math might also be accepted.

Career #6: Market Research Analyst

Median Annual Salary: $60,300*
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $113,500
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $33,280
Is the research gene in your DNA, but you just can't fathom another two years or more of graduate school? Then pursuing a job as a market research analyst could be right up your alley.
Life on the Job: Market research analysts really get involved in monitoring and forecasting trends in sales at the grassroots level. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, they devise questionnaires, surveys, and even polls to assess consumer behavior, and they provide insight to companies about the market and their competitors.
Why It Pays: According to Mease, big data companies like Nielsen, Capital One, and Red Ventures have a strong need for students skilled in marketing analytics. "It's more important and popular now because of enabling technologies to better understand customers," he says.
"If a student is well-versed in interpreting sets of data to drive decisions and as a by-product saving or generating revenue for the company, then the salary of the person easily pays for itself." And this is why pay could be high right off the bat - even without a master's.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Marketing Program.
Education Requirements: Strong math and statistical skills are needed in this field, says the Department of Labor. Typically, market research analysts need a bachelor's degree in market research or a related field. Many of these professionals have degrees in other fields like statistics, math, or computer science, says the Department. Others may have studied business administration, communications, or one of the social sciences.

Career #7: Medical and Health Services Manager

Median Annual Salary: $88,580*
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $150,560
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $53,940
You want to work in health care, and have a mind for small details and managing people. The only thing is, you don't really want to go back to school to get a master's or graduate degree. You might want to prep for a high-paying career in medical and health services management.
Life on the Job: As a medical and health services manager, the U.S. Department of Labor says you'll likely be planning and coordinating care by potentially managing a hospital, a department, or a group of physicians at a doctor's office. Improving the delivery of health care services will be your goal, and you'll schedule staff and stay abreast of medical laws and your facility's finances in order to meet that goal, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
Why It Pays: For Newell, medical and health services manager salaries tend to be higher because there are always new policies and programs and the demand for professionals with a business and medical background is very high. "This career pays well because there's so much unknown in health care, and we need individuals who know how to roll out new programs and assist in seamless caregiving," says Newell.
Next step: Click Here to Find the Right Health Care Administration Program.
Educational Requirements: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, "prospective medical and health services managers have a bachelor's degree in health administration." However, don't be surprised to find candidates with an advanced degree, as the Department says master's degrees are also common.

What You Actually Need For A High-Paying Career

Source: Yahoo

Creds Needed For High-Pay Jobs

Looking for a high-paying career? Find out exactly what you need to get started.

By Diana Bocco
Looking for a career that pays the big bucks? Earning a degree is a good place to start, but keep in mind that for many high-paying careers, a degree alone might not make the cut.
That's because high-caliber careers tend to be highly competitive, so a degree without other credentials is often no longer sufficient to achieve success in certain fields, according to Roy Cohen, a career coach and the author of "The Wall Street Professional's Survival Guide." "Once the bar has been set higher - and continues to be reset - candidates must begin to accumulate additional skills, experience, certifications, and degrees to give them a unique and competitive advantage," he says.
But don't get discouraged just yet. Here's a breakdown of seven high-paying careers, and insight from experts about the skills, certifications, or expertise that could put a little extra hop in your step as you start down the long path to pursue them.

Career #1: Computer Systems Analyst

Median annual wage*: $79,680
Bottom 10 percent of earners: $49,950
Top 10 percent of earners: $122,090
Imagine if you could take your business-minded side and marry it with your technically-inclined self to use all of your best skills. You can - in a lucrative career as a computer systems analyst.
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, computer systems analysts study an organization's computer systems and procedures, and then make recommendations to help the organization operate more efficiently and effectively. They also oversee system updates and make sure the new systems meet the company needs.
Click to Find the Right IT and Information Systems Program.
Credentials You'll Need: To pursue a career as a computer systems analyst, you'll first need a bachelor's degree in a computer-related field. According to the Department of Labor, that's what most computer systems analysts have. Dr. Michael Goul, chair of the information systems department within Arizona State University's W. P. Carey School of Business, says that most computer systems analysts have a bachelor's in either computer or information science.
He also adds that those wishing to start a career as a computer systems analyst should be able to demonstrate both technical and business skills. Goul recommends that students focus on improving their skills in the areas of database, programming, analytics, and systems analysis and design methodologies, as well as marketing, management, and business communication.

Career #2: Financial Analyst

Median annual wage*: $76,950
Bottom 10 percent of earners: $47,130
Top 10 percent of earners: $148,430
Numbers are your friend, and you can see yourself using your number-crunching talents to analyze data and make financial recommendations. Sound like you? Then you may want to take a closer look at what it takes to prepare to pursue a high-paying career as a financial analyst.
Financial analysts help individuals and corporations make smart investment decisions so they can build or expand their investment portfolios, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. To do this, they evaluate financial data and market fluctuations, and study business trends. They also analyze a company's finances to determine what type of investment is best for them, the Department of Labor says.
Click to Find the Right Finance Program.
Credentials You'll Need: A bachelor's degree in economics, finance, statistics, business administration, accounting, or a related field is usually the minimum requirement to get started in this career, according to the Department. For advanced positions, employers often require a master's in business administration or a master's in finance, says the Department.
Cohen has an idea as to why: "Financial analysts are often recruited from MBA programs for positions that involve greater responsibility and some decision-making," he says. That's because MBAs with a concentration in finance tend to have rigorous curriculums that focus specifically on business training and advanced financial modeling far beyond what is taught at the undergraduate level, Cohen explains.
"And for employers who are involved in structuring complex financial transactions and solutions, this training is essential and often not provided in undergraduate programs," Cohen adds.

Career #3: School Principal

Median annual wage*: $87,760
Bottom 10 percent of earners: $58,530
Top 10 percent of earners: $130,810
A school principal position is ideal for those who want to remain involved in the educational field, but not necessarily lead a classroom anymore. That's because principals might instead lead an entire school at the administrative level - and get paid handsomely to do it.
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, elementary, middle, and high school principals oversee the general inner-workings of a school, including everything from supervising the staff to ensuring the school has the proper tools and budget to function properly. School principals also monitor teachers and keep track of test scores to track the school's progress toward federal and state standards, the Department of Labor says.
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Credentials You'll Need: To prepare for a career as a school principal, you'll likely need a minimum of a master's degree in education administration or education leadership, according to the Department.
Most states also require that candidates receive a certificate from the state's department of education, says Tracy Brisson, the Founder and CEO of The Opportunities Project, a talent development and recruitment consulting agency.
"While certification requirements differ across states, the requirements for certification are generally a master's degree in educational administration, a clinical internship experience as a school leader, and a certain amount of years of professional teaching experience," Brisson explains.

Career #4: Human Resources Manager

Median annual wage*: $99,720
Bottom 10 percent of earners: $59,020
Top 10 percent of earners: $173,140
If you think you might enjoy being the liaison between an organization's employees and its management - in good times and in bad - a career as a human resources manager might be the right fit for you. The good pay might also suit you.
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, human resources managers are in charge of hiring, recruiting, and managing staff at organizations. They also advise managers on company policies, handle staffing issues, and supervise budgetary goals.
Click to Find the Right Human Resources Program.
Credentials You'll Need: To prepare to pursue a career as a human resources manager, you'll typically need a minimum of a bachelor's degree in human resources or business administration, according to the Department of Labor. It's also possible to get an undergraduate degree in a different subject, and then take additional courses in human resources-related subjects - such as industrial psychology or industrial relations - to be better prepared, the Department explains. A master's degree might be necessary if you want better opportunities for advancement.
And if you're interested in more strategic roles, consider getting certified as a PHR (Professional in Human Resources) or SPHR (Senior Professional in Human Resources), says Jackie Brito, the assistant dean of MBA admissions at the Rollins College Crummer Graduate School of Business. Why? "Having these credentials tells an employer that you have the body of knowledge to apply to any HR role and that you are committed to continued learning," Brito explains.

Career #5: Software Developer

Median annual wage*: $90,060
Bottom 10 percent of earners: $55,190
Top 10 percent of earners: $138,880
Are you tech-savvy enough to not only do the technical work of creating an application, but also have a creative side to dream it up as well? Consider a career as a software developer, where you could use a combination of those skills every day and hopefully earn top dollar while doing it.
Software developers are the masterminds behind all software you see and use today. They not only design and develop those software programs and systems, but they also conduct tests and upgrades and ensure software maintenance goes smoothly, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Software developers also create flowcharts to help guide code writers when building a program.
Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
Credentials You'll Need: Interested in preparing to go after a career as a software developer? The Department of Labor points out that most software developers have a degree in a computer or software-related field, such as software engineering or computer science.
But Laura Bartkiewicz, a technical recruiter for Eliassen Group, an IT recruiting firm, prefers the computer science degree. "In my experience, a computer science degree is more important and beneficial if the goal is to become a software developer," she says. Candidates should also try to get internships while they're still at school, as this will help them stand out as an entry-level candidate, Bartkiewicz adds.
Because the IT industry is booming at the moment, a master's degree (or even working towards one) in computer science is a major advantage for entry-level candidates, Bartkiewicz says. She adds that another thing to consider is to become certified. "Whether it's a Java Certification, or a Microsoft Certification, those credentials are an added bonus to employers that show you've passed a test and excelled in your domain."

Career #6: Art Director

Median annual wage*: $80,880
Bottom 10 percent of earners: $43,870
Top 10 percent of earners: $162,800
Do you have a creative side and strong visual communication skills? You may want to get started preparing to pursue a career as an art director. From what we can tell, it pays big.
Art directors are in charge of creating the visual style of magazines, TV shows, and product packaging, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. They supervise design staffs, and determine which art or photos are the most appropriate to express the concept the company has in mind. Art directors also develop budgets for each project, and then consult with clients and designers to find the best look, the Department of Labor says.
Click to Find the Right Graphic Design Program.
Credentials You'll Need: To get started as an art director, you'll need a bachelor's degree in a subject related to art or design, according to the Department. It also notes that you'll need previous work experience for this position. For example, depending on the industry, art directors may have worked previously as graphic designers, illustrators, copyeditors, photographers, or in another art or design occupation.
However, just as important as a degree is a strong portfolio resulting from that degree, according to Jolon Bankey, the managing director and hiring manager for Havas Magma Studios, a digital advertising and hiring agency. Why? Because a portfolio shows a potential employer what you're capable of doing and offering the company. "Without one, they might as well not show up for the interview," Bankey says.
He adds that in addition to an arts degree, employers also want to see some other studies mixed in, like psychology or semiotics: "This ensures that they are thinking about the most effective and interesting ways to engage their audience with the work, and they are more likely to go outside the box to achieve the best results."

Career #7: Medical and Health Services Manager

Median annual wage*: $88,580
Bottom 10 percent of earners: $53,940
Top 10 percent of earners: $150,560
Okay, you know you want to work in health care, but working with patients directly was never high on your to-do list. Maybe you should consider a high-paying career on the administrative side of health care, as a medical and health services manager.
Medical and health services managers plan and coordinate health services within hospitals, doctors' offices, or clinical departments, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. They might manage the finances of the facility, update systems and regulations based on the latest laws, and handle the organization of work schedules and patient billing. They also work to ensure optimal efficiency and quality in the medical services offered, says the Department of Labor.
Click to Find the Right Health Care Administration Program.
Credentials You'll Need: Typically, you'll need a minimum of a bachelor's degree in health administration to get started, according to the Department. Master's degrees in public health or public administration, health services, long-term care administration, or business administration are also common.
Why is a master's important? "A master's degree in management or business administration will increase your marketability," Brito adds. That's because a master's can help you tie together health services knowledge, while experience with solid business skills increases your value proposition, Brito says.

Jobs That Could Pay More than $40 An Hour


Jobs Paying $40+ An Hour

Wish you had more to show for your time on the clock? Here are seven careers that may increase your bottom line.

By Lia Sestric
Do you wish your paycheck made a bigger impact on your bank account? Good news: There are a range of jobs you could pursue that pay an average of $40 or more an hour - all of which could potentially beef up your bank account. In terms of salary, that might translate to more than $80K per year.
Why the high pay? All of these jobs have a common theme. "They're [in] industries that are growing quickly that really have a need for people who have an expertise in a given area," says Taunee Besson, president of Career Dimensions, a career management company in Dallas.
Interested in how you might pad your savings account? Keep reading to find out how to pursue one of these high-earning careers.

Career #1: Medical and Health Services Manager

Average Hourly Pay: $47.34 (or $98,460 per year)*
Health care is a business. And what does every successful business need? Someone who can manage it, says Besson. If you are business-oriented and have an interest in the future of health care, you may find that a career as a medical and health services manager is right up your alley. Plus, you have the potential to make a good living.
As a medical and health services manager (also called health care executives or health administrators), you will likely plan and direct medical and health services, says the U.S. Department of Labor. This could mean managing a group of physicians or even an entire facility.
The $40+ Factor: It boils down to the need for competent database management professionals in the health care industry, says Besson. "As a part of the new health care law, also called Obamacare, doctors' offices, hospitals, and other medical facilities are digitizing records to save time and money and become more patient-friendly," she says. And that means that office management and staff who are computer-literate and willing to learn and maintain these new systems are in great demand, Besson says.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Health Care Administration Program.
Education Options: "Prospective medical and health services managers have a bachelor's degree in health administration," although master's degrees in related fields are also common, according the Department of Labor. These fields may include health services, long-term care administration, public health, public administration, or business administration.

Career#2: Applications Software Developer

Average Hourly Pay: $44.85 (or $93,280 per year)
Your Smartphone is loaded with apps that you use every day. What if you could go from being an avid user to the creator of the next trendy app? If you pursue a career as an app software developer, there's a possibility you could design the next big download while making a sizeable hourly pay.
Software developers are "the creative mind[s] behind computer programs," says the U.S. Department of Labor. Some in this profession design the applications that allow people to do specific tasks on a computer, whereas others create the underlying systems that run the devices or networks, it says.
The $40+ Factor: Companies are willing to pay big bucks for software developers because they help technology run smoothly and advance, says Bill Peppler, managing partner at Kavaliro, a staffing agency in Orlando. He explains that software developers add value to a company, because they can design preventative software to avoid blips or detect problems before they become serious.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
Education Options: These professionals usually have a bachelor's degree in computer science, software engineering, or another related field, says the Department of Labor. Math degrees are also considered to be acceptable.

Career #3: Human Resources Manager

Average Hourly Pay: $52.69 (or $109,590 per year)
Do you enjoy getting to know people? Do you always make a conscious effort to remember names and particular attributes about people you meet? That attention to detail may be a good fit for a career as a human resources manager, and one that could earn you good pay at that.
What are the responsibilities of this position? "Human resources managers plan, direct, and coordinate the administrative functions of an organization," says the U.S. Department of Labor. You may oversee recruiting, interviewing, and hiring of new employees, as well as act as a liaison between management and its employees.
The $40+ Factor: Human resources managers are essential to the recruitment and retention within companies, says Besson. "Any company who is smart about how they do business realizes their most important asset is its people," she adds. "Having a human resources manager that can truly serve as part of the executive team and look upon how the company strategically is going to grow - and what people and skills the company will need to make that happen - is a very important player in the company."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Human Resources Program.
Education Options: The Department of Labor says human resources managers typically need a bachelor's degree in human resources or business administration, along with related work experience. Some higher-level positions may require a graduate level degree in human resources, labor relations, or business administration.

Career #4: Financial Manager

Average Hourly Pay: $59.26 (or $123,260 per year)
How would you like to increase your bottom line by helping an organization stay financially robust? You have the potential to do both as a financial manager.
A person in this profession might direct investment activities, produce financial reports, and develop strategies for the long-term financial goals of their organization, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
The $40+ Factor: People are willing to pay for a sense of financial security, especially when they don't have the expertise or time themselves, says Besson. "Given that we have gone through the great recession, everybody in this point of time recognizes how important it is to know how to take care of the money that you have and invest it in things that are going to grow or at least in things that are not going to collapse."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Finance Program.
Education Options: To pursue a career as a financial manager, you must usually have a bachelor's degree and more than five years of experience in another business or finance-related occupation, says the Department of Labor. Bachelor's degrees in finance, accounting, business administration, and economics are often the minimum education needed for this position. The Department does note that many employers seek applicants with a master's degree in accounting, finance, or economics.

Career #5: Actuary

Average Hourly Pay: $51.29 (or $106,680 per year)
If you have been told you over-analyze everything, this is a career where that trait is an asset. As an actuary, you can focus your analytical skills on minimizing costs for a business, while having the potential to earn a relatively high pay.
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, actuaries "use mathematics, statistics, and financial theory to asses the risk that an event will occur." They also help clients design policies that reduce the cost of that risk.
The $40+ Factor: Besson says that companies are willing to pay a lot of money for an actuary because of the role they play in determining risk - and as a result, the role they have in a company's revenue.
For example, an actuary determines the risk of insuring people of different ages with different kinds of medical issues, she says. This could make a big difference in the amount that is charged to cover an employee, and it all depends "tremendously on the actuary's statistics and predictions," she says.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Program.
Education Options: Actuaries typically have a bachelor's degree in mathematics, statistics, business, or actuarial science and need to pass a series of exams to obtain certification, according the Department of Labor.

Career #6: Computer Hardware Engineer

Average Hourly Pay: $49.99 (or $103,980 per year)
Know a thing or two about the inner-workings of a computer? Why not connect this skill set with a new, high-paying career as a computer hardware engineer?
"Computer hardware engineers research, design, develop, and test computer equipment such as chips, circuit boards, or routers," says the U.S. Department of Labor. By solving glitches with computer hardware, they help advance computer technology.
The $40+ Factor: These professionals help companies reduce time wasted when computer systems go down, says Peppler.
Besson adds that "[c]omputer hardware engineers are able to give their expertise to make sure critical systems are up and working properly". She notes that this is especially important in a military and/or scientific-use setting. And with so much at stake, these positions are well-rewarded, she says.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Programming and Software Program.
Education Options: "Most entry-level computer hardware engineers have a bachelor's degree in computer engineering, although a degree in electrical engineering is generally acceptable," according to the Department of Labor. Earning the degree from a program accredited by ABET (formerly the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) is preferred by some employers. A background in computer programming is usually needed as well, adds the Department.

Career #7: Public Relations Manager

Average Hourly Pay: $52.05 (or $108,260 per year)
Are you very conscientious about your image? How would you feel about polishing up the image of a business or client? As a public relations manager, you could help create a positive appearance of a company or person - and you may get a nice chunk of change in return.
As a public relations manager, you might direct public relations programs, raise funds for the company, and write media releases, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
The $40+ Factor: A company or person's brand is becoming increasingly important, especially with the popularity of social media, says Besson. Companies are willing to pay for positive publicity. "Goodwill isn't tangible, but if you are selling your company to stock holders or to an individual venture capital firm, goodwill actually has a value on it."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Communications Program.
Education Options: To enter a career as a public relations manager, the Department of Labor says you will typically need a bachelor's degree in communications, public relations, journalism. Also helpful is coursework in business administration, public speaking, and advertising.

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