7 Jobs That Pay Surprisingly Well No Bachelor's Needed


Great Jobs, No Bachelor's Needed

A four-year degree isn't the only way to make a decent income. Here are seven occupations that pay surprisingly well.

By Lia Sestric
Don't settle on a low-paying career just because you don't have a bachelor's degree. Metaphorically speaking, when life throws you a curve ball, don't put down your bat - keep playing the game!
Whether you can't afford or can't give the time to earning a bachelor's degree, take comfort in knowing it's not the only way to earn a decent paycheck. There are less time-consuming alternatives that could prep you to pursue a lucrative career.
"There are many different ways to end up in the position of being happy with your career and the pay that comes with it," says Bill Peppler, managing partner for Kavaliro, an Orlando-based staffing agency.
"Some of these routes may go through a four-year bachelor's degree, others may not. There is not just one specific plan for everyone to become successful, there are multiple tracks."
Are you ready to find out how you can track down the right one for you? We got you covered. Here are seven careers that are short on school, but big on pay.

Career #1: Paralegal

Median Annual Salary*: $46,990
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $75,410
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $29,420
Who says you have to make partner at a law firm to make a decent living? As a paralegal, you could bypass law school and get right to making a decent paycheck just by assisting a lawyer at the office.
Job Duties: The U.S. Department of Labor says a paralegal supports a lawyer in a number of ways, from maintaining and organizing files to investigating facts of a case and helping lawyers prepare for trials.
Why It Pays: A lawyer needs a highly skilled individual to handle the workload that has no room for error, says career coach Lavie Margolin, author of "Lion Cub Job Search: Practical Job Search Assistance for Practical Job Seekers." Paralegals are compensated for their "attention to detail, ability to work in a deadline driven environment, and [ability to] multi-task."
Plus, demand for this skill set will likely stay strong, says Margolin. "As long as there is a need for lawyers and the legal system, there will be a need for paralegals to help support them."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Paralegal Program.
Education Requirements: How long does it take to prepare for a career as a paralegal? Not as long as you may think. The Department of Labor says many paralegals have an associate's degree or a certificate in paralegal studies. Keep in mind, however, that those with the certificate also have a bachelor's degree in another subject.

Career #2: Computer Support Specialist

Median Annual Salary*: $46,420
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $77,430
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $27,620
Can you solve problems and keep your cool? A computer support specialist should be programmed to handle any technical break down. The good news is these professionals don't necessarily need a four-year degree to master the field.
Job Duties: "Computer support specialists provide help and advice to people and organizations using computer software or equipment," says the U.S. Department of Labor. There are two types of computer support specialists: technical support specialists and help-desk technicians.
Technical support technicians support IT employees within their organization by testing and evaluating existing network systems and performing regular maintenance. On the other hand, help-desk technicians assist non-IT users who are having computer problems by walking them through the steps to fix them, says the Department of Labor.
Why It Pays: We all know that technology fails us at times. So it's no surprise that Margolin says competent computer specialists are often needed at a moment's notice. "People are willing to pay to get their technology back up and running smoothly," he says. "It's worth paying a person a good price who is capable of doing that."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
Education Requirements: Although many employers prefer a bachelor's degree, the Department of Labor says an associate's or post-secondary classes may be enough to pursue this career. For more technical positions, degrees in computer science, engineering, or information science may be required. After they're hired, new computer support specialists typically enter a training program.

Career #3: Dental Hygienist

Median Annual Salary*: $70,210
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $96,280
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $46,540
Going to dental school isn't the only way to get into the lucrative field of dentistry. In fact, you could pursue a lucrative career as a dental hygienist and skip many of those years of schooling. Job Duties: As a dental hygienist, you might "clean teeth, examine patients for oral diseases such as gingivitis, and provide other preventative dental care," says the U.S. Department of Labor. A dental hygienist also educates patients about oral health.
Why It Pays: Dental hygienists have the bulk of the interaction with patients, and people don't want just anyone poking around in there. This is why the pay is high says Michael Echols, author of "Your Future is Calling," because the career demands a lot. "In addition to technical training required to do the work on a day to day basis, personality attributes that align with the requirements of the job are important. These include displaying a good-natured and cooperative attitude."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Dental Hygiene Program.
Education Requirements: Ready to start scraping teeth? The Department of Labor says an associate's degree in dental hygiene is typically needed to enter the profession. Every state requires these professionals to be licensed, but exact requirements vary, notes the Department.

Career #4: Registered Nurse

Median Annual Salary*: $65,470
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $94,720
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $45,040
The nursing profession is a great way to break into the booming health care field without having to spend an eternity in school. People can enter this career with a two-year degree that can potentially earn you a good chunk of cash.
Job Duties: Registered nurses (RNs) care for patients and also provide advice and emotional support to them and their family members, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
Why It Pays: The job isn't an easy task, says Echols. A person must have concern for others but also be able to tolerate stress. The job also requires physical strength to deal with immobile patients.

"Lifting, turning, and moving patients over a full shift is manually stressing for nurses who have passed the prime of their own physical strength and endurance."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Nursing Program.
Education Requirements: This career has an excellent job outlook. In fact, according to the Department of Labor, it is projected to be the occupation creating the most new jobs from 2010 to 2020. An associate's degree or a diploma from an approved nursing program are two common paths to enter the nursing field. People also earn a bachelor's of science degree in nursing. The Department also notes that registered nurses must also be licensed.

Career #5: Police Officer

Median Annual Salary*: $55,270
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $89,310
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $32,350
Police officers uphold the law, catch bad guys, and have high earning possibilities for the service they provide to the community. And get this: You don't have to go through several years of school if you want to pursue the career.
Job Duties: A police officer does more than arrest suspects. They respond to calls for service, patrol assigned areas, conduct traffic stops, and issue citations, says the U.S. Department of Labor.
Why It Pays: Upholding the law is serious business. "Being a police officer is extremely demanding and a dangerous field," says Margolin. "It involves a lot of sacrifice and a good salary is required for recruiting the right people."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Criminal Justice Program.
Education Requirements: What does it take to flash a shiny badge? The Department of Labor says a police officer must at least have a diploma or GED and graduate from an agency's training academy. However, many agencies do require a college degree or some coursework. Candidates usually are at least 21-years-old, "and meet rigorous physical and personal qualifications," the Department adds.

Career #6: Physical Therapy Assistant

Median Annual Salary*: $52,160
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $72,720
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $32,420
Want to help a person recover from injury through strength-training activities? A physical therapy assistant rehabilitates patients under the supervision of a physical therapist, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. If you like the idea of being a helpful sidekick, you may like it even more knowing you can earn a decent paycheck that doesn't cost you years of schooling.
Job Duties: In a nutshell, a physical therapy assistant shows a patient the ropes while keeping tabs on their status. They may help patients overcome injuries by assisting them with various exercises, says the Department of Labor.
Why It Pays: A physical therapist needs supportive personnel to handle the demands of the job, says Margolin. And that's where physical therapist assistants come in.
"It is worthwhile for PT offices to pay PTAs a reasonable salary, as a PTA saves the practice money by taking over the basic duties and allowing the PT to focus on the work that requires more technical/scientific know-how. The job of PTA is also physically demanding and the salary must correspond with that."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Physical Therapy Assistant Program.
Education Requirements: What does it take to jump into this profitable career? You may want to start by earning an associate's from an accredited physical therapist program. Most states require that in addition to licensure, says the Department.

Career #7: Construction Manager

Median Annual Salary*: $82,790
Top 10 Percent of Earners: $144,520
Bottom 10 Percent of Earners: $49,680
We all know buildings are not constructed out of thin air. There has to be a person who spearheads the project and keeps it in motion. If being at a construction site to watch every piece form together excites you, pursuing a career as a construction manager might be a good move. Plus it has high earning potential and could require less time in school.
Job Duties: This job requires more than wearing a hard hat. A construction manager coordinates and supervises a wide variety of projects, says the U.S. Department of Labor. These could be residential, commercial, or public, like the construction of a bridge. Specifically, they prepare budgets, select the appropriate construction method for the project, and supervise construction personnel onsite.
Why It Pays: In the lucrative world of real estate, construction managers bring a lot of value to property owners, says Margolin. 
"Construction management is a uniquely demanding field, as one must have knowledge of a variety of areas," he says.  Construction managers need "enough vocational knowledge to observe the work of various contractors and assess if they are performing the job correctly," and they must have "the ability to manage others in a physically demanding environment with tight budgets and deadline constraints." They also need to be aware of safety and construction regulations to be effective, he says.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Construction Management Program.
Education Requirements: The Department of Labor says an associate's degree combined with work experience may be enough for some positions. The Department also notes that "those with a high school diploma and years of relevant work experience will be able to work as construction managers, though they will do so primarily as self-employed general contractors." The Department points out that as construction processes are becoming more complex, a bachelor's degree is growing in importance.

10 Best Degrees For Finding A Job

Top 10 Majors For Employment

Choosing the right major could make or break your chances at getting a job after graduation.

By Andrea Argueta
Maybe you're considering going back to school, but find yourself questioning whether or not it is still worth it to invest so much time and money. Well, good news: at the moment, it still pays to earn a college degree.
At least that's what the Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce had to say after conducting its 2013 study "Hard Times: College Majors, Unemployment and Earnings." Another finding they uncovered? Not all college degrees are created equal.
Your chances of being unemployed after graduation largely depends on the field you choose to study. Anthony Carnevale, co-author of the Georgetown report and director of the Education and Workforce Center, suggests researching potential salaries and unemployment rates of the fields that interest you. "It's just smart to know if the major you're interested in is likely to get you a job," he says.
To help you with your investigation, here are the top 10 majors that report the lowest unemployment rates after graduation.*

Degree #1: Nursing

Unemployment Rate: 4.8%*
You're the go-to person when someone is feeling under the weather, but you still haven't made up your mind about getting that nursing degree. Well, you might make up your mind after you read this: according to the Georgetown report, nursing majors have the lowest unemployment rate among all recent college graduates.
Why? The increased demand in health care, says Carnevale. Today, Americans are spending one in every five dollars on health care, and this high demand for health services is making "the demand for nurses among the fastest in the economy," he says.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Nursing Program.
Common Courses: Nutrition, health assessment, microbiology, pharmacology, and adult nursing**

Degree #2: Elementary Education

Unemployment Rate: 5.0%
If you loved playing teacher when you were young, prepping to reprise that role now might be a good idea. According to the Georgetown report, elementary education majors have the second lowest unemployment rate among recent graduates.
The reason behind the low rate? Teacher retirement. "The elementary school workforce is among the oldest of the American working industries," says Carnevale. And as more teachers reach retirement age, more teaching spots open up.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Elementary Education Program.
Common Courses : Teaching methods, educational psychology, and education of the exceptional child

Degree #3: Physical Fitness and Parks and Recreation

Unemployment Rate: 5.2%
If the only thing that has kept you from previously enrolling in this program was the suspicion that jobs could be scarce upon graduation, you can breathe easy. This degree reports the third lowest unemployment rate among recent grads.
Where are all the jobs? The baby boomers' demand for services, recreational facilities, and activities is increasing the need for qualified candidates, says Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter, chief career writer and partner at CareerTrend.
There are a variety of ways to work in this industry, she says. "New grads can get their feet wet in an entry-level, seasonal, part-time and/or temporary role." She also says they can pursue jobs in cruise ships and volunteer agencies as well as recreation facilities like playgrounds, parks, camps, senior centers, and more.
Common Courses : Program and event planning, recreation leadership, area and facility design, and marketing recreation enterprises

Degree #4: Chemistry

Unemployment Rate: 5.8%
Almost blow up your parents' house? Maybe it's time to move those basement science experiments into a real lab. It would certainly be safer for your parents, and maybe for your career as well. According to the Georgetown report, recent chemistry grads have the fourth lowest unemployment rate.
Recent chemistry grads are facing a low unemployment rate, because hiring has increased in the private sector and in manufacturing, according to Carnevale. More chemistry grads are needed as industries continue to get more involved in chemical processing, he says. According to Industrial Info Resources, chemical processing "encompasses a broad range of products, including petrochemical and inorganic chemicals, plastics, detergents, paints and pigments, and more."
And that's not the only reason. Carnevale says the growing concern for the environment has also opened up a lot of "green jobs" for chemists.
Common Courses : Organic chemistry, thermodynamics, biochemistry, and inorganic chemistry

Degree #5: Finance

Unemployment Rate: 5.9%
If you'd like to learn how to make smart investment decisions, then you might consider earning a degree in finance. Choosing this major is itself a wise investment since, according to the Georgetown report, recent college graduates in this field have the fifth lowest unemployment rate.
According to Barrett-Poindexter, the low unemployment rate is due to operations in the recovering finance sector ramping back up. Strong, qualified, and ethical finance professionals are needed to fill open positions.
Carnevale echoes that, stating that financial management and reporting has become more extensive in every industry of the American economy. "Finance is a basic institutional function," he says.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Finance Program.
Common Courses : Financial management, international finance, investments, and financial markets and institutions

Degree #6: Mathematics

Unemployment Rate: 5.9%
Calculus, algebra, and geometry don't scare you. No, you actually enjoy these subjects. That's why a math degree would be a great option for you, especially if you'd like your career opportunities to multiply. Good news for you: recent math graduates have the same low unemployment rate that finance majors do.
"Math degrees have always been a star," says Carnevale. Recent math graduates always have a low unemployment rate, because you can sell the degree in a number of occupations. You could do anything from working in insurance companies to working in business, accounting, and financial services, Carnevale explains.
Common Courses : Linear algebra, modern geometry, number theory, and single-variable calculus

Degree #7: Hospitality Management

Unemployment Rate: 6.0%
If you'd like to learn the ins and outs of running a hotel, earning a hospitality management degree could pay off. In fact, recent hospitality management grads had the seventh lowest unemployment rate in the Georgetown report.
The reason? The economy. Hospitality jobs are very sensitive to the economy, says Carnevale. As the economy recovers, travel increases, and more people are needed for these jobs. "People have more money to spend," he says, so more people are staying in hotels.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Hospitality Management Program.
Common Courses: Resort operations, hospitality finance, marketing, festival and event management, and food service operations

Degree #8: Drama and Theater Arts

Unemployment Rate: 6.4%
Interested in theater and production? Rather than work as a server in NYC, waiting to be discovered, the Georgetown report suggests that you might want to head to school. Drama and theater arts had the eighth lowest unemployment rate among recent graduates, according to the Georgetown report. Who knew?
Surprising as it is, the public's demand for more movies and television shows is causing a need for more producers and directors, says Barrett-Poindexter. The field is also smaller, which could mean more opportunity. "Fewer students are graduating with a theater arts degree," says Barrett-Poindexter, "so there is less competition."
Common Courses: Acting, directing, costume design, dramatic literature, and theater history

Degree #9: Family and Consumer Sciences

Unemployment Rate: 6.4%
You're good at taking care of your family. You keep the budget in check. You make sure everyone is eating the right things and is getting along. And if you'd like to put to use all of these skills, you might want to go back to school and major in family and consumer sciences. Recent grads who took this path had the same low unemployment rate as drama and theater arts majors, according to the results of the Georgetown study.
The low unemployment rate is due to "a wide variety of career opportunities that exist in this field," says Barrett-Poindexter. Recent grads can pursue jobs in health and human services agencies, retail operations, government service, and even work as consultants, she adds.
Common Courses: Child development, meal management, housing, and family financial management

Degree #10: Marketing and Marketing Research

Unemployment Rate: 6.6%
Do you wish you could improve the ad campaigns you see on TV, Facebook, or Twitter? If so, a degree in marketing could teach you the basics to create your own. The best part: recent marketing grads don't face a high unemployment rate. In fact, they have the tenth lowest unemployment rate among all degrees listed in the Georgetown report.
And campaigns on Facebook and Twitter are the reason behind this low unemployment rate. "With the genesis of social media, the continuing need for informed talent to strategically employ social networking in marketing products and services has exploded," says Barrett-Poindexter.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Marketing Program.
Common Courses: Marketing strategy, consumer behavior, advertising and promotion, and international marketing

Five Industries That Are Leading The Economic Recovery

Fast-Growing Industries

A new report reveals the fastest-growing industries from 2010 to 2020 - and the importance of a college degree to pursue a career in one of them.

By Terence Loose
After the Great Recession of the past several years, the country seems to finally be getting back on its feet. But will it look the same in terms of employment?
A new report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce* says no. And there are two factors that are driving this conclusion: a shift in industries that are projected to be the fastest-growing in the U.S. from 2010 to 2020, coupled with the increasing importance of a college degree for many jobs in these industries.
For example, in a different Georgetown report from 2010**, the industries that topped the fastest-growing list from 2008 to 2018 were health care and STEM (science, technology, engineering, math). But neither of these industries is first on the list in the 2013 report.
And the importance of a postsecondary education continues to grow. "What's clear is that in the past decade, the entry-level skill and education requirement has gone way up," says Anthony P. Carnevale, the center's director and co-author of the study. In fact, of the 55 million job openings that are forecasted from 2010 to 2020, 65 percent - or 36 million - will require some college education.
We dove deeper into the report and took a look at the five fastest-growing post-recession industries, along with the education you may need to pursue a career in one of them. So read on, because some of the information may be quite educational.

#1: Private Education Services

Rate of Growth from 2010 to 2020: 28 percent*
With parents more concerned than ever about the quality of their kids' education, private education has grown rapidly in the past few decades, Carnevale says. And since it shows no sign of slowing down, he doesn't see it as a surprise that this was the number one fastest-growing industry in the Recovery 2020 study.
Why It's Growing: "More and more people recognize that the quality of their children's education will pretty much determine their ability to pass on their middle-class status - or to leverage their kids into the middle class, if they themselves aren't in the middle class," says Carnevale. So, parents are taking more control of their kids' education through private schools, he says.
Why College Is Required: The vast majority of the workers in this group are teachers and principals, says Carnevale. "And they're very highly educated. The overwhelming majority has at least some college and often bachelor's and graduate degrees," he says.
Potential Career: Elementary school teacher
Love the idea of helping the next generation learn new concepts and skills? How about working with individual students to challenge them and developing and enforcing classroom rules? That's what the U.S. Department of Labor says teachers do. And according to the Department of Labor, private elementary schools typically seek teachers who have a bachelor's degree in elementary education.
Next step: Click to Find the Right K-12 Program Now.
The Department says that job opportunities for elementary teachers (both public and private) are expected to grow by 17 percent from 2010 to 2020, or by 248,800 jobs.

#2: Health Care Services

Rate of Growth from 2010 to 2020: 26 percent*
With just about every person in America needing some kind of health care service, this has long been a big growth industry, says Carnevale. Perhaps the only shocker, then, is that it came in at number two, not number one.
Why It's Growing: One of the biggest drivers of growth has been nurses, says Carnevale. "Nurses have been a big growth profession for a very long time, for the last decade or two," he says. Another big reason is an aging nation. Baby boomers are hitting retirement age, but are living longer and needing more health services, because they want to stay healthy and active into their twilight years, he says.
Why College Is Required: Although there are many jobs in health care that don't require college degrees, says Carnevale, more and more jobs require some post-high school education. As for that big job driver, "[nursing is] moving toward a bachelor's requirement more and more," says Carnevale.
Potential Career: Registered nurse
If you've always enjoyed helping people get well or educating them on how to stay healthy, a career as a nurse could be a good fit. To prepare, the U.S. Department of Labor says most nurses take one of three educational paths: a bachelor's of science in nursing (BSN), an associate's degree in nursing (ADN), or a diploma from an accepted nursing program. Registered nurses also must be licensed.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Nursing Program.
According to the Department of Labor, job opportunities for registered nurses should be "excellent," with a growth of more than 700,000 jobs, or 26 percent, from 2010 to 2020.

#3: Professional & Business Services

Rate of Growth from 2010 to 2020: 25 percent*
This category includes the army of mostly college-educated workers that both big and small companies hire as independent contractors, says Carnevale. These contractors can be anything from paralegals and lawyers to architects and managers, says Carnevale.
Why It's Growing: "This category didn't even exist prior to 2000," says Carnevale. "So the growth in business services really reflects that there's a fundamental structural change in our economy." That change is a trend toward businesses contracting out as much work as they can, says Carnevale. "So the contracting out of technical, managerial, professional, and support workers has been enormous."
Why College Is Required: Carnevale says that this group is made up of a lot of white-collared workers, including a lot of management positions [that require college degrees]. "They are mostly professionals, so it's a huge employer for college graduates," says Carnevale.
Potential Career: Paralegal
If you're not ready for years of law school, a career as a paralegal may be a good alternative for entering this booming occupational group. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, paralegals investigate facts for cases, help lawyers prepare for trials, and even assist them in court. The Department of Labor says most paralegals have an associate's degree in paralegal studies or a bachelor's degree in any subject with a certificate in paralegal studies.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Paralegal Program.
According to the Department, job opportunities for paralegals are projected to grow by almost 46,900 jobs, or 18 percent, from 2010 to 2020.

#4: Financial Services

Rate of Growth 2010 to 2020: 25 percent*
Did you think that the collapse of Wall Street a few years back meant the collapse in demand for those skilled in finance? Well, think again, says Carnevale. "It always surprises people that this sector is growing, but it is," he says.
Why It's Growing: "Financial structures became more and more complicated - so complicated they eventually collapsed. But as a result of that complexity, every institution has a finance person. That wasn't true 20 years ago. But now, it's a must," says Carnevale.
Why College Is Required: Carnevale says that this group is a very educated one, with many bachelor's and master's degrees in finance, business, and other related fields. He says these workers need to be educated in not only finance and business economics, but also the latest government regulations.
Potential Career: Financial analyst
Do you like the idea of studying economic and business trends for a living? How about suggesting investment strategies to businesses and individuals?  Those are just a few of the things financial analysts do, says the U.S. Department of Labor. Many positions require a bachelor's degree in a field such as business administration, accounting, finance, economics, or statistics, says the Department of Labor.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Finance Program.
According to the Department, financial analyst jobs will grow 23 percent, or by 54,200 openings, from 2010 to 2020.

#5: Leisure & Hospitality

Rate of Growth 2010 to 2020: 18 percent*
This industry is a lot more than a battalion of maids and tour guides making your vacation memorable. In fact, the leisure and hospitality industry, says Carnevale, is made up of 30 to 40 percent college-educated professionals. And thanks to the end of the recession, it's growing fast, says Carnevale.
Why It's Growing: "This industry is one of the first to get hit in a recession, because it's the first thing you don't do - take the family trip to the national park. So it takes such a heavy hit in the recession that when the recovery comes, it recovers stronger than a lot of the other industries, because there's a pent-up demand," says Carnevale.
Why College Is Required: You might think that the leisure and hospitality industry has a lot of low-wage, non college-educated workers - and you'd be right. "But they also support a managerial group and technical people, a real mix of professional people that any industry needs to run. So a large number of the industry jobs require college," says Carnevale.
Potential Career: Lodging Manager
These professionals are the people who make sure your hotel stay is a pleasurable one, while also ensuring the efficiency of the hotel and its staff, says the U.S. Department of Labor. Most full-service hotel chains hire managers with a bachelor's degree in hospitality or hotel management, says the Department of Labor. At hotels that provide fewer services, the Department says applicants with an associate's degree or certificate in hotel, restaurant, or hospitality management may qualify.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Hospitality Management Program.
The Department says lodging manager jobs should grow by 8 percent, or more than 4,300 jobs, from 2010 to 2020.

7 common types of managers and how to work with them


Whether you love 'em or want to leave 'em, your manager plays a significant role in your work life. And the sooner you understand your boss's management style, the easier your work day becomes.
Weighing in on the different types of managerial styles is a panel of experts: Kathleen Brush has a Ph.D. in management, more than 20 years' experience as a senior executive and is the author of "The Power of One: You're the Boss." George Dutch is a career and leadership development consultant at www.jobjoy.com. Jeremy Kingsley is a professional speaker and author of "Inspired People Produce Results." Roberta Matuson is the author of "Suddenly in Charge: Managing Up, Managing Down, Succeeding All Around" and president of Matuson Consulting.

Check out these common types of managers, as well as advice for a better working relationship.

1. The Neanderthal
"[This style] of leadership is the boss who delivers directions in the form of orders, like 'do this' or 'do this now,'" Brush says. "This is the boss that hasn't quite embraced that he is a leader of thinking, caring people and not cavemen that are fine with communications that sound more like grunts." If your manager is stuck in the Stone Age, make the extra effort to clarify his directions and understand that quarter's objectives and the projects you're assigned.
2. The Mum
"[This] is one where the boss seems to forget that employees are not like mushrooms -- they don't do well in the dark," Brush says. "The best thing for an employee to do with a shy boss or one with the 'Mum' style is to give regular prompts or pings for communications. Ask for directions, updates and feedback. This employee may find that she is training her boss, who may have been quite competent as a shy individual contributor, and that's okay. Employees that help their bosses look good, without making them feel inadequate, will usually find their boss's gratitude in exchange."
3. The Director
"The manager prefers to get the work done through the efforts of others -- subordinates, assistants, associates -- in the manner they, as the boss, determine is correct, appropriate or effective," Dutch says. The Director is great at moving projects forward and getting work done, though the constant flow of orders may cause some employees to feel over-managed. If you work better with a hands-off manager, strive to show how successful your projects and work can be when done on your own, and establish a track record of accomplishments.
4. The Micro-manager
"This person is always involved in every aspect, almost like a control freak," Kingsley says. "They need to know every detail, no matter how small, and seem to hover around employees watching their every move. A few things that may help in this situation: First, send an email to them with updates often, maybe even on a scheduled day and time. Second, when you see them, mention a few words about how things are going. Assure them with a positive outlook on progress."
5. The Warm and Fuzzy Manager
"They always have something nice to say, always mention how great the company is doing and how they think you are doing a great job," Kingsley says. "Now, encouragement is of course a good thing, but not giving honest feedback is not. First, ask them to be up front and open with you. Second, give them permission to share concerns and constructive criticism."
6. The Democratic Manager
"This person likes to draw from the knowledge and skills of other people," Kingsley says. "They like to create groups and promote brainstorming. Depending on the situation, this can be positive or negative. Certain situations can be quickly solved with a group discussion. Certain situations can take a turn for the worse when there are 'too many cooks in the kitchen.' First, if asked to be involved, make sure it is an area that you really can add value; don't just sit in to take up space. Second, when you are in a meeting, speak up and share what you think is best. Be kind but direct."
7. The Laissez-faire Manager
This type of manager is hands off, Matuson explains. "[He] provides very little communication and believes that people know exactly what to do without being told. You can best manage this type of boss by being respectful of his time. Ask clarifying questions, keep your boss informed and be prepared to manage your own performance."
No matter what type of manager you have, remember that the relationship is just as much about you as your boss. "There are bad bosses out there, without a doubt," Dutch says. "And some workplaces are structurally dysfunctional. But each relationship is a two-way street, and most relationships break down due to poor communications which, in itself, is often a symptom of deeply rooted misunderstandings about what truly motivates us."

Five High-Powered Jobs Where You Can Still Have a Life

Source: Yahoo
Jobs For Work-Life Balance

You don't need to sacrifice having a high-powered career to juggle family, friends, and the rest of life's obligations.

By Danielle Blundell
If you think that having a good work-life balance means that you can't hold a high-powered job, you're wrong. Having it all - an important job and time to spend with friends and family - comes down to smart choices and prioritizing your goals.
But truth be told, not all jobs are created equal when it comes to the division between work and leisure.
"It is easier to maintain an appropriate work-life balance in some careers more than others," says Cheryl Palmer, career coach and owner of career coaching firm, Call to Career.
"Some careers, like physicians for example, are extremely demanding, and you have to modify your life to accommodate your career, depending on which specialty you go into," Palmer says. "In other careers it is easier to balance both life and work - even in careers that are high-powered."
Wondering which professions could give you this work-life balance you're looking for? Read on for careers where you can have a fruitful professional and personal life.

Career #1: Teacher

Love kids and think you'd relish the task of shaping impressionable young minds? Then pursuing the important job of a teacher could be the type of career you need for both job satisfaction and good work-life balance.
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, a day in the life of a teacher could include tasks such as planning lessons, setting up classroom rules and discipline procedures, and working with individual students to challenge them and overcome their weaknesses.
The Balancing Act: It comes down to having a regular schedule and summers off. "Teaching is an important role that has the advantage of offering work-life balance, because teachers typically do not have to work year-round unless they choose to," says Palmer. "That two-month vacation [during the summer] gives teachers a chance to recharge their batteries."
Plus, Palmer says that the average workweek during the school year is around 40 hours, which gives teachers an opportunity to have a life outside of work.
Next step: Click to Find the Right K-12 Education Program.
How to Pursue This Career: The Department of Labor says all states require public kindergarten and elementary school teachers to have at least a bachelor's degree in elementary education. It also notes that teachers in public schools must be licensed or certified.

Career #2: Sales Engineer

If you're a cross between a science geek and a social butterfly, then pursuing a career as a sales engineer just might be perfect for you. That's because you can hold this high-powered position while still maintaining your social life.
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, sales engineers sell complex scientific and technological products to businesses. The Department of Labor says you'll need to have extensive knowledge of the products' parts and functions to be successful. It adds that you'll also need interpersonal skills to build relationships with clients and effectively communicate with other members of the sales team.
The Balancing Act: According to Palmer, science-savvy sales engineers make good money. The Department of Labor states the median salary is about $90,000. On top of that, they can often make their own hours, since they can decide when to meet with prospective clients, Palmer says.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Engineering Program.
How to Pursue This Career: You'll likely need a bachelor's in engineering or related field to pursue this career, says the Department. The Department does note, however, that related work experience is highly valued when seeking employment.

Career #3: Computer Programmer

If getting paid to tinker with apps and write software sounds too good to be true for your tech-savvy self, then maybe it's time to look into pursuing a job as a computer programmer. Plus, you can have the flexibility to balance all of life's obligations in this commanding role.
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, computer programmers contribute in a big way to their respective companies by writing and debugging new and existing code to run programs and applications for computers.
The Balancing Act: Palmer says computer programmers make good money - $74,280 is the median annual salary, according to the Department of Labor. "[A]nd many of them have the option of telecommuting since programming can be done from anywhere," she says. This combination means that "[p]rogrammers can have the best of both worlds in that they make a good salary, have interesting and important work, and can have a life outside of their day jobs," she says.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
How to Pursue This Career: While some companies hire workers with an associate's degree, most computer programmers have a bachelor's degree, the Department says. They study computer science or a related subject, which gives students the skills needed to learn new computer languages easily, says the Department.

Career #4: Registered Nurse

Compassionate, caring, and helpful are three words your friends might use to describe you. And if you want a meaningful career where you can make an impact on people's lives - but also have one of your own - nursing may be right up your alley.
According to the U.S. Department of Labor, RNs are responsible for more than just administering medication and giving shots. They're also extremely integral to the process of diagnosing patients and teaching them how to properly manage their ailments once they've left the hospital or practice, says the Department of Labor.
The Balancing Act: There's regularity, Palmer says, to nurses' work weeks that helps them have time for themselves and their friends and family. "They generally have a specific shift that they work (i.e., 7-3, 3-11, 12-7)," Palmer says, which leaves downtime for activities and relaxing outside that time frame.
She adds that those who work in schools and office settings have the added bonus of working regular business hours. And when they have to work weekends, they'll have weekdays free to compensate for it, she says.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Nursing Program.
How to Pursue This Career: There are three common approaches to pursuing a career as a registered nurse, according to the Department: a bachelor's of science degree in nursing, an associate's degree in nursing, or a diploma from an approved nursing program.

Career #5: Graphic Designer

Creativity has always been your strong suit, and you love doodling - on paper, the computer, anywhere. Why not pursue a career where you could be the brains behind big ad campaigns, logos, and websites one day? Plus, a career in graphic design could mean you won't have to sign your life over to your employer for a chance at potentially high-profile work.
What's the daily grind look like? The U.S. Department of Labor says graphic designers could be responsible for things like meeting with clients, designing new artwork for use in advertisements or websites, and advising companies on strategies to reach audiences.
The Balancing Act: According to Palmer, graphic design is a great field for artsy types that want a nice mix between responsibility and freedom.
"Graphic designers do exciting, interesting work," says Palmer. "They get to be creative, and many of them have the option of telecommuting. The telecommute option contributes to work-life balance since it gives workers more flexibility than a job where you have to report to the office every day."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Graphic Design Program.
How to Pursue This Career: You'll need a bachelor's degree in graphic design or a related field in order to be considered for most positions in graphic design, says the Department of Labor. The Department also notes that developing a portfolio of design work is also key to breaking into this business.

How Your Salary Ranks Across the Nation

Does your salary measure up

Find out how your salary compares to national averages in these common occupations.

By Terence Loose
Are you making the salary that you should? Or more to the point: Are you making the money you could?
The average American makes $45,790, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. But the salary for specific occupations can vary widely depending on your state and your particular role.
So we picked a range of common jobs in a crosscut of the nation's industries, from business and finance, to technology, education, and health care. Then we crunched the numbers from the Department of Labor's March 2013 National Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates to see what these common jobs pay, on average, in various regions of the country. We also threw in salary figures for some similar occupations for a more well-rounded analysis.*
Keep reading to see how your career stacks up against the competition.

Accountant

If you're an accountant, crunch the numbers on your own profession - you'll likely come away smiling. That's because nationwide, the average annual salary for accountants is about $25,000 higher than the national average for all occupations, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. And rightfully so, since accountants do things like check financial statements to make sure they comply with laws, compute taxes, and prepare returns.
"The financial services industry is currently going through a transformation due to the recent recession and stricter regulatory requirements, and so accountants are more valued than ever before," says Ryan Himmel, CPA, founder and CEO of BIDaWIZ.com, an organization that advises businesses about finance and taxes.
Let's take a look at the breakdown of accountant salaries across the nation:
Average Annual Salary Nationwide: $71,040, with the 10th percentile making $39,930, the 90th percentile making $111,510, and the median at $63,550.
States Where Accountants Earn the Most: 1. District of Columbia ($87,370); 2. New York ($85,140); 3. New Jersey ($81,470)
States Where Accountants Earn the Least: 51. North Dakota ($54,620); 49. West Virginia ($57,140); 48. South Dakota ($57,540)
Next step: Click to Find the Right Accounting Program.
Average Annual Salaries Nationwide For Similar Occupations:
  • Financial analyst: $89,410
  • Human resources specialist: $60,660
Education Level: Most accountants need at least a bachelor's degree in accounting or a related field, and a certification in a specific field of accounting improves job aspects, says the Department.

Registered Nurse

The money looks good for registered nurses. Even the lowest-paying U.S. state reports an annual average salary for nurses that is above the national average, according to U.S. Department of Labor (read on to find out which state it is). Nurses work in everything from doctors' offices to large hospitals and do everything from setting up patient care plans to giving patients medicine and treatments, says the Department of Labor.
Nurses will be in higher demand and command higher than average salaries in the future for many reasons, including the fact that health care is one of the fastest-growing occupational clusters, says Nicole Smith, senior economist at the Georgetown University Center for Education and the Workforce, an organization which studies labor market demands, including those of the health care industry.
Here's a snapshot of how they get compensated for their good work:
Average Annual Salary Nationwide: $67,930, with the 10th percentile making $45,040, the 90th percentile making $94,720, and the median at $65,470.
States Where Nurses Earn the Most: 1. California ($94,120); 2. Hawaii ($84,750); 3. Massachusetts ($83,370)
States Where Nurses Earn the Least: 51. Iowa ($54,540); 50. South Dakota ($52,800); 49. North Dakota ($53,250)
Next step: Click to Find the Right Nursing Program.
Average Annual Salaries Nationwide For Similar Occupations:
  • Diagnostic medical sonographer: $66,360
  • Medical records and health information technician: $36,770
Education Level: The Department says these professionals must have a license and usually take one of three paths to pursue their career: a bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN), an associate's degree in nursing (ADN), or a diploma from an approved nursing program.

Applications Software Developer

According to the U.S. Department of Labor salary stats, applications software developers get paid well above the average American. That's because developers of software applications design computer applications for consumers, such as games or word processors, and create programs that people can use over the Internet, says the Department of Labor.
"This is the field to be in if you want good pay and good job security in my opinion, because every business is reliant on computers," says Susan Heathfield, a management consultant and writer of About.com's Guide to Human Resources. She adds that with cloud computing and multiple personal computing devices now common, software developers' value has only increased.
Now let's see how their compensations computes.
Average Annual Salary Nationwide: $93,280, with the 10th percentile making $55,190, the 90th percentile making $138,880, and the median at $90,060.
States Where Applications Software Developers Earn the Most: 1. California ($105,120); 2. Maryland ($104,740); 3. Massachusetts ($102,730)
States Where Applications Software Developers Earn the Least: 51. North Dakota ($66,290); 50. Idaho ($72,380); 49. Wyoming ($73,090)
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
Average Annual Salaries Nationwide For Similar Occupations:
  • Computer programmer: $78,260
  • Database administrator: $79,120
Education Level: The Department says software developers usually have a bachelor's degree in computer science, software engineering, or a related field. Mathematics is also acceptable, but the Department says a computer science degree is most common.

Elementary School Teacher

We can't argue with the oft-voiced idea that our next generation's teachers should earn more. But the fact is, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, teachers earn more than the average for all occupations by more than $10,000. And summers off too! Elementary school teachers, for example, earn their pay by creating and carrying out lesson plans, and using teaching aides such as computers to help kids learn new concepts, says the Department of Labor.
But there's one catch: Certain areas of the country have higher demand - and therefore higher pay - than others. "The thing with elementary school teachers is that they will have to be willing to follow the jobs, because demand will be regional, as will level of pay," says Heathfield.
Now let's check out how the mentors of our most valuable assets - kids - fair nationwide.
Average Annual Salary Nationwide: $56,130, with the 10th percentile making $35,630, the 90th percentile making $83,160, and the median at $53,400.
States Where Elementary School Teachers Earn the Most: 1. Rhode Island ($74,310); 2. New York ($71,270); 3. California ($69,690)
States Where Elementary School Teachers Earn the Least: 51. South Dakota ($39,900); 50. Mississippi ($41,740); 49. Oklahoma ($42,120)
Next step: Click to Find the Right Elementary Education Program.
Average Annual Salaries Nationwide For Similar Occupations:
  • Kindergarten Teacher: $53,030
  • High School Teacher: $57,770
Education Level: The Department says all states require elementary school teachers in public schools to have at least a bachelor's degree in elementary education, and to be licensed. Other requirements, such as having to major in the subject they teach, vary by state, the Department adds.

Marketing Manager

You could have the best product since the iPhone, but if you don't market it properly, there's a chance no one will ever know about it - which may be one reason why marketing managers see a hefty salary. Marketing managers might do things like instigate market research, plan advertising campaigns, and even direct the hiring of marketing staff, says the Department.
Heathfield says one reason companies pay these workers so well is that they rely on sophisticated marketing campaigns to sell their products. "Marketing has never been so important thanks to social media and the speed with which information is shared," she adds.
As we said, marketing managers, on average, are making well above the average. But let's dig a little deeper.
Average Annual Salary Nationwide: $129,870, with the 10th percentile making $62,650, the 90th percentile making $187,199 or greater, and the median at $119,480.
States Where Marketing Managers Earn the Most: 1. New York ($168,460); 2. District of Columbia ($150,280); 3. New Jersey ($150,000)
States Where Marketing Managers Earn the Least: 51. West Virginia ($83,100); 50. Wyoming ($84,720); 49. Mississippi ($85,130)
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Program.
Average Annual Salaries Nationwide For Similar Occupations:
  • Public Relations Manager: $108,260
  • Chief Executives: $176,840
Education Level: The Department says that most marketing managers have a bachelor's degree and typically work experience in marketing, promotions, advertising, or sales. They don't specify a major but say classes in business law, management, accounting, finance, economics, mathematics, and statistics are an advantage.

The Seven Hottest Online Bachelor's Degrees

Hot Online Degrees

Thinking about attending school online? Familiarize yourself with these top online bachelor's programs before you enroll.

By Andrea Duchon
You've decided that you want to go back to school and earn a degree - but you're still not sure how you're going to fit education into your busy schedule. Why not join the many students who have pursued a degree online?
In fall 2011 alone, 32 percent of all students enrolled in postsecondary instruction were taking at least one online course.* But it's not just convenience that makes online education attractive, says Carole Beauchemin, assistant dean of academic and faculty affairs at Northeastern University's College of Professional Studies: "Online programs provide students the opportunity to interact with colleagues and instructors across a wide geographic span and range of experiences."
This is not to say online education is right for everyone. But for those who are interested, we took a look at the most popular majors for online students from a recent study titled "Online College Students 2013: Comprehensive Data on Demands and Preferences" conducted by The Learning House, Inc., an organization that helps colleges and universities develop online degree programs, and Aslanian Market Research.** Keep reading to find out which programs topped the list.

#1 - Business Administration

Business makes the world go round, so it's no surprise that a degree in business administration is highly sought after. How popular is it? Business administration ranked number one on the "Online College Students 2013" study.
Charley Polachi, partner at Polachi Access Executive Search, an executive headhunting firm, isn't that surprised either. "This should and will always be a highly popular online degree among students," he says.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Business Administration Program.
What You Might Study: In a business administration and management program, you could take classes in subjects like operations management, marketing, business statistics, and economics, according to the College Board, an organization that promotes higher education.
Potential Career Paths***:

#2 - Accounting

This number-crunching degree seems to be a favorite to study online, ranking as the second most popular program of study in the report.
But it shouldn't come as much of a surprise. "I think accounting lends itself to online learning because the basics have not changed in the field in the last few years," Polachi says. "The body of knowledge is pretty developed, which makes it easy for students to digest the information at their own pace without getting caught up on new concepts," he adds.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Accounting Program.
What You Might Study: Accounting courses run the gamut from intro to intermediate to advanced, according to the College Board. You can also expect to take other courses like business law, auditing, and tax accounting.
Potential Career Paths:

#3 - Information Technology

The world suddenly seems to revolve around everything digital, so it makes sense that online degrees in the computer-centric field of information technology are ranked third in popularity in the "Online College Students 2013" study.
And because of its technological focus, it's a great degree to earn online. "You're already behind a computer most of the time when you're pursuing a degree in information tech, so IT lends itself to the online format better than most other degree programs," Polachi says. "Plus, information tech students are generally more self-driven, so they prefer the solo structure of online learning versus traditional classroom learning."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Information Technology Program.
What You Might Study: In your quest to earn a bachelor's degree in IT, the College Board says you could study courses like computer networking, C++ programming, computer systems and architecture, and Web technologies.

#4 - Criminal Justice

Are you fascinated with the police or the FBI and how they go about tracking down criminals? You're probably not the only one. Criminal justice programs ranked fourth in the list of most popular online degrees.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Criminal Justice Program.
What You Might Study: As a criminal justice major, you could study everything crime and law related, says the College Board. You'll also read up on countless court cases, and take courses like victimology, policing society, and juvenile justice.

#5 - Finance

Who doesn't want to learn how to make more money? That's what we thought. Everyone does. This is probably why finance ranked fifth in the "Online College Students 2013" report on most popular online programs.
Nicole Williams, a LinkedIn career expert, notes that because every office can use someone with a finance background, it's often a popular degree path for students looking to secure jobs after graduation.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Finance Program.
What You Might Study: The College Board says you might take courses in financial markets and institutions, investments, financial management, and analysis of financial statements.

#6 - Psychology

If you're interested in learning about how people interact with one another, you may want to consider a degree in psychology, which is the sixth most sought-after online degree, according to the study.
"Given the demographics of online students and considering previous or current work experience and/or employment status, it makes complete sense why this online degree is a top one among students," says Sharon D.D. Reid, executive director and founder at Tate Ellington Associates, a New York City firm that specializes in career and outplacement counseling. "This knowledge has concrete applicability to the workplace and can help performance and career advancement."
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Psychology Program.
What You Might Study: Perception and sensation, cognitive psychology, personality, social psychology, and neuroscience are all typical courses listed by the College Board.
Potential Career Paths:

#7 - Health Care Administration

Tying for seventh place with graphic design in popularity in the "Online College Students 2013" report is health care administration, a major that could help you prepare to pursue a career in the booming health care sector.
Polachi says one reason this degree is so popular is because technological advancements have eased communication lines with medical professionals around the world - which in turn provides students an opportunity to engage with these professionals. Plus, he adds that students who study online may have more time for hands-on training.
"With less 'classroom' time, students are able to spend more time implementing their knowledge and gaining hands-on experience through internships," Polachi says.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Online Health Care Administration Program.
What You Might Study: In a health services administration program, the College Board says, you could take courses in subjects like accounting, health care law, health care finance, and even health care statistics.

Top 7 Degrees For Re-Entering The Workforce

Source: Yahoo
Best Degrees For Getting Re-Hired

If you're one of the long-term unemployed, one of these degrees could help you get back in the game.

By Tricia Tongco
Consumers are shopping again. Housing prices are no longer in freefall. And even more importantly, unemployment is on the decline. With the economy in recovery mode, what's the best way to launch yourself back into the workforce?
"When you're trying to re-enter the workforce, you're introducing yourself to a world of people who don't know you and don't inherently 'get' you," says Matt Berndt, a campus career coach and the director of career services at CSO Research, a career center solutions company. "So, your job is to make them understand who you are, what you have to offer, and what you're looking for."
After the recession and its long stretch of high unemployment, it makes sense to want a promising job outlook. According to Berndt, if the goal is to transition directly into a job, then you'll want to select a degree in an industry that has a great need for job candidates and that will train you to do a specific job in the marketplace.
We've pored over a number of studies and U.S. Department of Labor statistics to figure out which degrees might give you the best shot in today's professional world. Whether you've been unable to find a job or decided to opt out of working to spend time with your family, studying these fields will help prepare you with the skills and knowledge to make you a valuable employee in today's labor market.
Don't look back at this period of discouraging unemployment; instead, look ahead to a future full of possibility, low unemployment rates, and high job growth. Put away your resume, stop pounding the pavement, and look over our list of the best degrees for re-entering the working world.

Degree #1: Elementary Education

Unemployment Rate: 5%*
Do you love the smell of freshly sharpened pencils in the morning? Or reading stories to young children? Then majoring in elementary education could be the right path for you. And for anyone who's been through long spells of unemployment, you'll be happy to know that recent college graduates who majored in elementary education report one of the lowest unemployment rates.
"Education can be appealing as a transitional degree, because there is a clear set of credentials you need for a school to be able to hire you," notes Berndt.
As an education major, you'll learn how to "design and teach inspiring lessons and help students succeed no matter what their age, background, or learning style," according to the College Board, an educational organization that administers aptitude tests like the SAT. Typical courses could include educational psychology, teaching methods, and philosophy of education.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Elementary Education Program.
Related Careers and Projected Growth From 2010-2020**:
  • Elementary school teacher: 17%
  • Middle school teacher: 17%
  • Special education teacher: 17%

Degree #2: Nursing

Unemployment Rate: 4.8%
Would you consider yourself a caregiver with an inquisitive mind? If you major in nursing, you could learn how to figure out the mystery behind a patient's symptoms. For those re-entering the workforce who want to help others, this in-demand degree is perfect.
"Our population is aging, so nursing is an area of great growth right now," says Berndt. He adds that if you're looking for a job that's portable, you can be a nurse almost anywhere. "Nursing is one of those areas that is available in almost every community in the country.
The demand for nursing is reflected in the Georgetown Report, which notes that nursing is the major with the lowest unemployment rate among recent grads. It is also listed as one of the top 50 fastest-growing occupations with a typical entry-level education of an associate's degree, according to CareerOne Stop, a source for employment information funded by the U.S. Department of Labor. From 2010 to 2020, the Department of Labor projects that there will be 711,900 jobs added for registered nurses.
In a nursing program, your instruction could include working in a hospital or another health care setting, says the College Board. Typical courses could include health assessment, anatomy and physiology, and chemistry.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Nursing Program.
Related Careers and Projected Growth From 2010-2020:
  • Registered nurse: 26%

Degree #3: Health Care Administration

Unemployment Rate: 4.6%
With the baby-boomer population aging and people remaining active later in life, the health care industry will experience a spike in demand for medical services, states the U.S. Department of Labor. In turn, there'll be an increase in the number of facilities, and health care administrators will be needed to manage medical information and staff. This makes for an industry with high growth and a low unemployment rate - both good news for people who have experienced the challenges of unemployment.
"Health care will be a big economic driver, and there will need to be administrators who help support doctors and nurses in nonmedical ways," says Berndt.
If you choose to study health services administration, you could learn all aspects of overseeing health care facilities and services, says the College Board. Typical courses include health care policy, anatomy and physiology, and human resources management, according to the College Board.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Health Care Administration Program.
Related Careers and Projected Growth From 2010-2020:
  • Medical or health services manager: 22%

Degree #4: Computer Science

Unemployment Rate: 8.7%
Do you consider yourself both analytical and imaginative? Studying computer science encourages you to develop both of these traits and offers bright job prospects. Although the Georgetown study reports a slightly higher unemployment rate, this major is still very marketable for people who are re-entering the workforce.
"Technology drives so much of what we do - just look at the cell phones that seem to be surgically attached to our hands," says Berndt. "There's a great demand for people who develop, craft, and manage [computer] applications."
According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers' "Job Outlook 2013," a bachelor's in computer and information sciences is considered one of the "top degrees in demand," with 65.3% of companies polled saying that they will hire students with this educational background.
Students in a computer science program may study the way humans and computers collaborate from a scientific perspective, says the College Board. They typically take courses in artificial intelligence, digital system design, and software engineering.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.
Related Careers and Projected Growth From 2010-2020:
  • Computer systems analyst: 22%
  • Web developer: 22%
  • Computer network architect: 22%

Degree #5: Accounting

Unemployment Rate: 8.8%
Do you want to learn how to interpret numbers for companies or individuals? Accounting students do just that, and having a head for numbers can really pay off. With this valuable degree, you might not be unemployed for long.
According to the NACE study, 58.7% of companies surveyed state they would hire graduates with a bachelor's in accounting. "Everybody pays taxes, so everyone's going to need accountants," says Berndt. "Accounting is one of those core things that everyone, individuals and businesses, uses at least once in their life or in many cases, frequently."
An accounting major prepares you for analyzing financial information and consulting with upper management about important business decisions, says the College Board. Typical courses could include auditing, tax accounting, and business law, notes the College Board.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Accounting Program.
Related Careers and Projected Growth From 2010-2020:
  • Accountant: 16%
  • Financial examiner: 27%

Degree #6: Business Administration

Unemployment Rate: 7.8%
Are you ready to take on challenges and potentially reap rewards in the business world? Then it might be time to earn that bachelor's degree in business administration. It's a top degree according to the NACE study, which reports that 55.6% of employers surveyed would hire students with the degree. So, this degree could make you incredibly attractive during your job search.
And for business majors, there seem to be opportunities everywhere. "Everything is a business - every government, school, church, or not-for-profit," says Berndt. "No organization of any kind is going to be successful without sound business principles."
As a business administration and management major, you could develop your leadership, speaking, and writing skills, says the College Board. You would typically take courses in business ethics and law, economics, and marketing.
Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Administration Program.
Related Careers and Projected Growth From 2010-2020:
  • Market research analyst: 41%
  • Financial analyst: 23%

Degree #7: Engineering

Unemployment Rate: 7%
Want to learn how things work, from robots to the Brooklyn Bridge? Engineering may be just the degree to launch yourself back into the working world. In addition to a relatively low unemployment rate reported for recent college graduates with the major, The NACE reports that 74% of responding companies say they'd hire engineering graduates.
According to Berndt, engineering is a broad field with many different specializations and varying levels of demand in the marketplace, but petroleum, mechanical, civil, and environmental engineers are the most in-demand.
As an engineering student, you could apply math and science to solve practical problems and help create everything from spacecrafts to MP3 players, according to the College Board. You would typically take courses in economics and ethics for engineers, physics, and scientific visualization, notes the College Board.
Related Careers and Projected Growth From 2010-2020:
  • Administrative services managers: 15%
  • Computer support specialists: 18%
  • Construction managers: 17%

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